Catalogue


Palmerston and The Times : foreign policy, the press and public opinion in mid-Victorian Britain /
Laurence Fenton.
imprint
London ; New York : I.B. Tauris, 2013.
description
213 p. ; 22 cm.
ISBN
1780760744 (hbk.), 9781780760742 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
London ; New York : I.B. Tauris, 2013.
isbn
1780760744 (hbk.)
9781780760742 (hbk.)
catalogue key
8699477
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [192]-204) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"There is no doubt that newspapers played an ever increasing role in public and political life during the nineteenth century, and their importance and influence grew in consequence. In Palmerston and The Times Laurence Fenton has drawn out a number of illuminating points of detail and information and offers a closer examination of the dynamics of Palmerston's connections with the press." David Brown, Professor of History, University of Southampton
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Summaries
Main Description
Victorian Britain had two players of colossal influence on the world stage: Lord Palmerston - the dominant figure in foreign affairs in the mid-nineteenth century - and The Times - the first global newspaper, read avidly by statesmen around the world. Palmerston was also one of the first real media-manipulating politicians of the modern age, forging close links with a number of publications to create the so-called "Palmerston press." His relationship with The Times, however, was turbulent and became a prolonged and bitter rivalry. For The Times, Palmerston was no more than "a flippant dandy;" to Palmerston, The Times was a treacherous "liar." In this book, Laurence Fenton explores the highly-charged rivalry between these two titans of the mid-Victorian era, revealing the personal and political differences at the heart of an antagonism that stretched over the course of three decades.
Bowker Data Service Summary
This text explores the highly-charged rivalry between Lord Palmerston and The Times newspaper, two titans of the mid-Victorian era, revealing the personal and political differences at the heart of an antagonism that stretched over the course of three decades.
Main Description
Victorian Britain had two players of colossal influence on the world stage: Lord Palmerston ? the dominant figure in foreign affairs in the mid'nineteenth century ? and The Times ? the first global newspaper, read avidly by statesmen around the world. Palmerston was also one of the first real media'manipulating politicians of the modern age, forging close links with a number of publications to create the so'called 'Palmerston press'. His relationship with The Times, however, was turbulent and became a prolonged and bitter rivalry. For The Times, Palmerston was no more than 'a flippant dandy'; to Palmerston, The Times was a treacherous 'liar'. In this book, Laurence Fenton explores the highly'charged rivalry between these two titans of the mid?Victorian era, revealing the personal and political differences at the heart of an antagonism that stretched over the course of three decades.
Main Description
Victorian Britain had two players of colossal influence on the world stage: Lord Palmerston - the dominant figure in foreign affairs in the mid-nineteenth century - and The Times - the first global newspaper, read avidly by statesmen around the world. Palmerston was also one of the first real media-manipulating politicians of the modern age, forging close links with a number of publications to create the so-called "Palmerston press." His relationship with The Times, however, was turbulent andbecame a prolonged and bitter rivalry. For The Times, Palmerston was no more than "a flippant dandy;" to Palmerston, The Times was a treacherous "liar." In this book, Laurence Fenton explores the highly-charged rivalry between these two titans of the mid-Victorian era, revealing the personal and political differences at the heart of an antagonism that stretched over the course of three decades.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgementsp. vii
Introductionp. 1
The Politicianp. 5
The Paperp. 16
Origins of Animosityp. 27
A New Editorp. 52
Palmerston vs. Guizotp. 71
Revolutionsp. 87
The Rise and Fall of Palmerstonp. 107
Rapprochementp. 125
The Last Yearsp. 144
Conclusionp. 160
Notesp. 164
Bibliographyp. 192
Indexp. 205
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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