Catalogue


The triumph of prudence over passion, or, The history of Miss Mortimer and Miss Fitzgerald /
Elizabeth Sheridan ; edited with an introduction and notes by Aileen Douglas and Ian Campbell Ross.
imprint
Dublin : Four Courts Press, c2011.
description
200 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
1846822890 (hbk.), 9781846822896 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Dublin : Four Courts Press, c2011.
isbn
1846822890 (hbk.)
9781846822896 (hbk.)
abstract
This is an unconventional epistolary novel set in Ireland and France in 1779 and 1780, against the background of the patriot political agitation that marked the age of Grattan's parliament. The young women who write the bulk of the novel's letters link the state of Ireland and the conditions of its women.
catalogue key
8683786
target audience
Specialized.
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 198-200).
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2012-01-01:
This latest release in the "Early Irish Fiction, c. 1680-1820" series is a fascinating epistolary novel, first published as two volumes in 1781. The text consists of 53 letters from five correspondents, but most of the letters are between Miss Eliza Fitzgerald and Miss Louisa Mortimer. The central theme concerns several courtships--particularly the courtship of Eliza--but this is not a traditional romantic novel since the other heroine, Louisa, refuses to marry her suitor. The letters carry insightful, entertaining commentary on the political and social scene, along with lighter observations on human relationships and fashions. Originally published anonymously, the work is attributed by the editors to Elizabeth Sheridan, sister of the playwright Richard Brinsley Sheridan. Douglas and Ross (both, Trinity College Dublin) note in the introduction that the fiction is clearly influenced by the author's personal experience, specifically the early loss of her mother. As in the other works in the series, the editors provide supportive information on the period and the author as well as notes and a select bibliography. The novel promises to be an important source for study of the 18th-century novel. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. M. H. Kealy Immaculata University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, August 2011
Choice, January 2012
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Originally published in 1781, The Triumph of Prudence over Passion; or, The History of Miss Mortimer and Miss Fitzgerald is an unconventional epistolary novel set in Ireland and France in 1779 and 1780, against the background of the patriot political agitation that marked the age of Grattan's parliament. The young women who write the bulk of the novel's letters link the state of Ireland and the condition of its women, powerfully endorsing liberty for both. Their witty and incisive commentary - on political events, male and female relations, education, and national differences - is accompanied by lighter observations on fashion, polite amusements, and affairs of the heart. Yet, while the novel contains several love stories, it departs strikingly from fictional convention by having its heroine refuse to marry her suitor, preferring instead to remain in a single state. The novel, published anonymously, is here attributed for the first time to Ann Elizabeth (Betsy) Sheridan, daughter of the novelist Frances Sheridan and the theatre manager and elocutionist Thomas Sheridan.
Bowker Data Service Summary
This is an unconventional epistolary novel set in Ireland and France in 1779 and 1780, against the background of the patriot political agitation that marked the age of Grattan's parliament. The young women who write the bulk of the novel's letters link the state of Ireland and the conditions of its women.
Main Description
Originally published in 1781, The Triumph of Prudence over Passion; or, The History of Miss Mortimer and Miss Fitzgerald is an unconventional epistolary novel set in Ireland and France in 1779 and 1780, against the background of the patriot political agitation that marked the age of Grattan's parliament. The young women who write the bulk of the novel's letters link the state of Ireland and the condition of its women, powerfully endorsing liberty for both. Their witty and incisive commentary - on political events, male and female relations, education, and national differences - is accompanied by lighter observations on fashion, polite amusements, and affairs of the heart. Yet, while the novel contains several love stories, it departs strikingly from fictional convention by having its heroine refuse to marry her suitor, preferring instead to remain in a single state. The novel, published anonymously, is here attributed for the first time to Ann Elizabeth (Betsy) Sheridan, daughter of th

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