Catalogue


Tell this in my memory : stories of enslavement from Egypt, Sudan, and the Ottoman Empire /
Eve M. Troutt Powell.
imprint
Stanford, California : Stanford University Press, c2012.
description
xiv, 246 p. : ill., maps.
ISBN
0804782334 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780804782333 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Stanford, California : Stanford University Press, c2012.
isbn
0804782334 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780804782333 (cloth : alk. paper)
contents note
Prologue : 'abid : a word with a long history -- Public workers, private properties: slaves in 'Ali Mubarak's historical records -- Babikr Bedri's long march with authority -- How Salim C. Wilson wrote his own enslavement -- Huda and Halide and the slaves at bedtime -- Black mothers and fathers, sanctified by slavery -- The country of Saint Josephine Bakhita -- Epilogue : laws of return.
catalogue key
8682750
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Eve M. Troutt Powell is Associate Professor of History at the University of Pennsylvania. She is the author of A Different Shade of Colonialism: Egypt, Great Britain, and the Mastery of the Sudan (2003). In 2003, she was a recipient of a MacArthur "Genius" Grant.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Looking at slavery in modern Egypt from the perspective of both elite slave-owning families and slaves themselves, Tell This in My Memoryoffers a richly textured picture of how slavery was lived in one corner of the world. A marvelous book."--Martin Klein University of Toronto
"Restoring the voices of long-silenced people, Troutt Powell's book leads the way in identifying and exploring some of the most important narratives of enslaved people-black and white, male and female-as they navigated the harsh conditions of slavery and claimed their freedom and dignity. Troutt Powell weaves a compelling set of stories into a unified interpretation and a grand narrative. This is an impressive work."--Chouki El Hamel, Arizona State University
"This eagerly awaited book exceeds expectations. Troutt Powell asks probing questions about the lives of enslaved and freed women and men, creatively providing answers through perceptive readings of chronicles, memoirs, photographs, and other sources. She
"This eagerly awaited book exceeds expectations. Troutt Powell asks probing questions about the lives of enslaved and freed women and men, creatively providing answers through perceptive readings of chronicles, memoirs, photographs, and other sources. She skillfully narrates the stories of slaves, restoring dignity and meaning to their lives while simultaneously adding texture to our understanding of the experiences of owners. With its elegant prose and poignant tales, Tell This in My Memoryis a literary masterpiece."--Beth Baron, CUNY Graduate Center, author of Egypt as a Woman: Nationalism, Gender, and Politics
"A beautifully written account of the experience of Sudanese enslavement in the Central Islamic Lands in the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Drawing upon multiple languages and variegated sources, Troutt Powell weaves a moving and evocative tapestry, employing multiple perspectives of the enslaved as well as slaveholders. Her analysis of the conditions of enslavement as well as the challenging processes through which those conditions become known is nothing short of brilliant. This is an extraordinary contribution to the intertwined studies of slavery, the Muslim world, and Africa's complex diaspora."--Michael Gomez, New York University
"A beautifully written account of the experience of Sudanese enslavement in the Central Islamic Lands in the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Drawing upon multiple languages and variegated sources, Troutt Powell weaves a moving and evocative tapes
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Summaries
Main Description
In the late nineteenth century, an active slave trade sustained social and economic networks across the Ottoman Empire and throughout Egypt, Sudan, the Caucasus, and Western Europe. Unlike the Atlantic trade, slavery in this region crossed and mixed racial and ethnic lines. Fair-skinned Circassian men and women were as vulnerable to enslavement in the Nile Valley as were teenagers from Sudan or Ethiopia. Tell This in My Memory opens up a new window in the study of slavery in the modern Middle East, taking up personal narratives of slaves and slave owners to shed light on the anxieties and intimacies of personal experience. The framework of racial identity constructed through these stories proves instrumental in explaining how countries later confrontedor notthe legacy of the slave trade. Today, these vocabularies of slavery live on for contemporary refugees whose forced migrations often replicate the journeys and stigmas faced by slaves in the nineteenth century.
Bowker Data Service Summary
This text opens up a window on the study of slavery in the modern Middle East, taking up personal narratives of slaves and slave owners to shed light on the anxieties and intimacies of personal experience.
Main Description
In the late 19th century, an active slave trade sustained social and economic networks across the Ottoman Empire and throughout Egypt, Sudan, the Caucasus, and Western Europe. Unlike the Atlantic trade, slavery in this region crossed and mixed racial and ethnic lines. Fair-skinned Circassian men and women were as vulnerable to enslavement in the Nile Valley as were teenagers from Sudan or Ethiopia. Tell This in My Memoryopens up a new window in the study of slavery in the modern Middle East, taking up personal narratives of slaves and slave owners to shed light on the anxieties and intimacies of personal experience. The framework of racial identity constructed through these stories proves instrumental in explaining how countries later confronted--or not--the legacy of the slave trade. Today, these vocabularies of slavery live on for contemporary refugees whose forced migrations often replicate the journeys and stigmas faced by slaves in the 19th century.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Prologue: 'Abid, A Word with a Long Historyp. 1
Public Workers, Private Properties: Slaves in 'Ali Mubarak's Historical Recordsp. 7
Babikr Bedri's Long March with Authorityp. 39
How Salim C. Wilson Wrote His Own Enslavementp. 77
Huda and Halide and the Slaves at Bedtimep. 115
Black Mothers and Fathers, Sanctified by Slaveryp. 149
The Country of Saint Josephine Bakhitap. 185
Epilogue: Laws of Returnp. 207
Notesp. 215
Bibliographyp. 233
Indexp. 241
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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