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Remaking the male body : masculinity and the uses of physical culture in interwar and Vichy France /
Joan Tumblety.
imprint
Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2012.
description
xiii, 257 p. : ill., ports. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0199695571 (hbk.), 9780199695577 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2012.
isbn
0199695571 (hbk.)
9780199695577 (hbk.)
catalogue key
8679356
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [233]-246) and index.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Long Description
Remaking the Male Body looks at interwar physical culture as a set of popular practices and as a field of ideas. It takes as its central subject the imagined failure of French manhood that was mapped out in this realm by physical culturist 'experts', often physicians. Their diagnosis of intertwined crises in masculine virility and national vitality was surprisingly widely shared across popular and political culture. Theirs was a hygienist and sometimes overtly eugenicistconception of physical exercise and national strength that suggests the persistence of fin-de-siècle pre-occupations with biological degeneration and regeneration well beyond the First World War. Joan Tumblety traces these patterns of thinking about the male body across a seemingly disparate set of voices, allof whom argued that the physical training of men offered a salve to France's real and imagined woes. In interrogating a range of sources, from get-fit manuals and the popular press, to the mobilising campaigns of popular politics on left and right and official debates about physical education, Tumblety illustrates how the realm of male physical culture was presented as an instrument of social hygiene as well as an instrument of political struggle. In highlighting the purchase of these concernsin the interwar years, the book ultimately sheds light on the roots of Vichy's project for masculine renewal after the military defeat of 1940.
Main Description
Remaking the Male Body looks at interwar physical culture as a set of popular practices and as a field of ideas. It takes as its central subject the imagined failure of French manhood that was mapped out in this realm by physical culturist 'experts', often physicians. Their diagnosis of intertwined crises in masculine virility and national vitality was surprisingly widely shared across popular and political culture. Theirs was a hygienist and sometimes overtly eugenicist conception of physical exercise and national strength that suggests the persistence of fin-de-siecle pre-occupations with biological degeneration and regeneration well beyond the First World War. Joan Tumblety traces these patterns of thinking about the male body across a seemingly disparate set of voices, all of whom argued that the physical training of men offered a salve to France's real and imagined woes. In interrogating a range of sources, from get-fit manuals and the popular press, to the mobilisingcampaigns of popular politics on left and right and official debates about physical education, Tumblety illustrates how the realm of male physical culture was presented as an instrument of social hygiene as well as an instrument of political struggle. In highlighting the purchase of these concerns in the interwar years, the book ultimately sheds light on the roots of Vichy's project for masculine renewal after the military defeat of 1940.
Main Description
Remaking the Male Body looks at interwar physical culture as a set of popular practices and as a field of ideas. It takes as its central subject the imagined failure of French manhood that was mapped out in this realm by physical culturist 'experts', often physicians. Their diagnosis ofintertwined crises in masculine virility and national vitality was surprisingly widely shared across popular and political culture. Theirs was a hygienist and sometimes overtly eugenicist conception of physical exercise and national strength that suggests the persistence of fin-de-sieclepre-occupations with biological degeneration and regeneration well beyond the First World War. Joan Tumblety traces these patterns of thinking about the male body across a seemingly disparate set of voices, all of whom argued that the physical training of men offered a salve to France's real and imagined woes. In interrogating a range of sources, from get-fit manuals and the popular press, tothe mobilising campaigns of popular politics on left and right and official debates about physical education, Tumblety illustrates how the realm of male physical culture was presented as an instrument of social hygiene as well as an instrument of political struggle. In highlighting the purchase ofthese concerns in the interwar years, the book ultimately sheds light on the roots of Vichy's project for masculine renewal after the military defeat of 1940.
Table of Contents
List of illustrationsp. xi
List of abbreviationsp. xii
Introduction: 'Mens sana in corpore sano': the fragile bodies of menp. 1
Physical Culturists, Masculine Ideals, and Social Hygiene in Interwar Francep. 17
The world of physical culture in the 1920s and 1930sp. 19
Get-fit literature for menp. 29
Social hygienep. 44
Conclusionp. 54
The Body of the Citizen-Soldier: Physical Education and the Statep. 57
The 'French method' and the armyp. 60
Institutional cross-fertilizationp. 62
The public powers, biological regeneration, and the conseil de révisionp. 68
Physical education reform, surmenage, and social hygienep. 74
The era of the Popular Frontp. 79
The Paris World's Fair of 1937p. 84
Conclusionp. 93
Male Bodies Between Associative Life and Consumer Spectacle: The Mass Press and Popular Practicep. 95
Male sporting cultures and normative masculinityp. 99
Body culture, print culturep. 107
Sport and male bodily regenerationp. 116
Experience and subjectivityp. 124
Conclusionp. 131
The Uses of Sport and Physical Culture in Mass Politics: Mobilizing the 'New Man', 1918-1934p. 133
Mobilizing young men through sport and physical culturep. 135
Training a combat elitep. 149
Building the 'new man' and revirilizing France: the poilu and the conscriptp. 156
Conclusionp. 165
Mass Culture and Mass Politics, 1934-1940p. 167
The rightist leaguesp. 169
The socialist and communist leftp. 171
Croix de Feu/Parti Social Français (PSF)p. 179
Parti Populaire Français (PPF)p. 191
Front de la Jeunessep. 201
Conclusionp. 203
The Defeat of French Manhood and the Vichy Imaginationp. 205
Physical education and the project of masculine renewal under Vichyp. 206
Eugenics and regeneration under the Occupationp. 212
Physical culturists under the Occupationp. 217
Physical culture on the radical rightp. 222
Conclusionp. 225
Conclusionp. 227
Bibliographyp. 233
Indexp. 247
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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