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The politics of addiction [electronic resource] : medical conflict and drug dependence in England since the 1960s /
Sarah G. Mars.
imprint
Basingstoke : Palgrave Macmillan, 2012.
description
xiii, 260 p. : 1 ill. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0230221386 (hbk.), 9780230221383 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Basingstoke : Palgrave Macmillan, 2012.
isbn
0230221386 (hbk.)
9780230221383 (hbk.)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8675042
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 223-243) and index.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
'The Politics of Addiction' examines power and policy-making in the context of a bitter conflict between private and publicly employed doctors treating addiction.
Description for Bookstore
A history of the bitter conflict between private and NHS doctors over the treatment of addiction from the 1960s to the present
Long Description
In the 1980s, after a period of peaceful co-existence, a bitter conflict arose between National Health Service psychiatrists and private doctors treating drug addiction. Continuing into the twenty-first century, the battle ended with most private addiction doctors being struck from the medical register. This book examines how the conflict played out and what weapons were used by each side. The contrasting organizational structures of the private and public doctors and the changing policy context help to explain why one side triumphed and the other succumbed to extensive medical discipline. Personalities also played an important part: senior civil servants took a major role in shaping British policy to their own privately held beliefs and turnover in these posts significantly affected attempts to regulate private doctors. Based on 55 oral history interviews with key players and private prescribers as well as previously undisclosed documents, The Politics of Addiction gives a detached, historical analysis of this polarised debate.
Main Description
From the 1960s, conflict emerged in the medical profession regarding the role of private doctors in prescribing opiates and other drugs to patients. Were they simply licensed drug dealers or instead providing a treatment neglected by the public sector? Doctors at Warprovides a balanced explanation of this conflict, its origins and outcomes.
Main Description
From the 1960s, conflict emerged in the medical profession regarding the role of private doctors in prescribing opiates and other drugs to patients. Were they simply licensed drug dealers or instead providing a treatment neglected by the public sector?Doctors at Warprovides a balanced explanation of this conflict, its origins and outcomes.
Table of Contents
List of Tables and Figures
Acknowledgements
Introduction
Changes in Drug Treatment, Services and Policy, 1965-99 Major Policy Change
The Treatment and Rehabilitation Report (1982) Major Regulatory Interventions
The Guidelines of Good Clinical Practice in the Treatment of Drug Misuse (1984)Major Regulatory Interventions
The Dally Cases (1983-88) and the General Medical Council The Role of the Home Office Drugs Inspectorate and the Misuse of Drugs Tribunals Major Regulatory Interventions
1999 Guidelines and the Licensing Question Organisation and Representation: Three Professional Groupings
Summary and Conclusions
Interviewed Doctors Professional Roles
Timeline of Major Events
Bibliography
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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