Catalogue

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Commerce and its discontents in eighteenth-century French political thought [electronic resource] /
Anoush Fraser Terjanian.
imprint
Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2013.
description
xiv, 226 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
9781107005648 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2013.
isbn
9781107005648 (hardback)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Machine generated contents note: Introduction: Commerce and its discontents; 1. Bon luxe, mauvais luxe: a language of commerce; 2. Doux commerce, commerce odieux: the commerce in humans; 3. Cette odieuse piraterie: defining piracy; 4. Indigne ateliers: monopoly and monopolists; Conclusion: Commerce and its discontents.
abstract
"By uncovering the ambivalence toward commerce in eighteenth-century France, this book questions the assumption that commerce was widely celebrated in the era of Adam Smith"--
catalogue key
8671417
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 189-214) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A major contribution to the history of Enlightenment economic and political thought, Commerce and Its Discontents in Eighteenth-Century French Political Thought enhances our understanding of late eighteenth-century debates over the place of commerce in state and society. In an erudite and theoretically sophisticated account, Anoush Terjanian breaks with a long historiographic tradition that has emphasized the Enlightenment's favorable attitude to 'sweet commerce'. Focusing on Abbé Raynal's best-selling, multivolume History of the Two Indies - a work that is shown to have been every bit as important as The Wealth of Nations - Terjanian uncovers the deep ambivalence attached to practices such as monopoly, slavery and piracy, as well to the consumption of luxury goods. Thoughtful and elegantly written, this book will be a major reference for scholars of Enlightenment, empire and political economy." - Madeleine Dobie, Columbia University
"Terjanian's argument proceeds from a brilliant insight - namely, that ambivalence actually defined the eighteenth century's attitude toward commerce and all that it brought in its wake.... Commerce and Its Discontents in Eighteenth-Century French Political Thought is a smart, engagingly written and indisputably important book." - Jay M. Smith, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
By uncovering the ambivalence toward commerce in 18th-century France, this book questions the assumption that commerce was widely celebrated in the era of Adam Smith.
Description for Bookstore
The roots of modern commerce and the origins of economics are usually traced to Adam Smith and his alleged celebration of free trade. Questioning this conventional story, Anoush Fraser Terjanian uncovers ambivalence towards commerce in eighteenth-century France. Through careful analysis of the Enlightenment's best-selling history of comparative empires, the History of the Indies (1780), her study offers a new perspective on the connections between political economy, imperialism, and the Enlightenment.
Main Description
Histories of economics tend to portray attitudes towards commerce in the era of Adam Smith as celebrating what is termed doux commerce, that is, sweet or gentle commerce. Commerce and Its Discontents in Eighteenth-Century French Political Thought contends that reliance on this doux commerce thesis has obscured our comprehension of the theory and experience of commerce in Enlightenment Europe. Instead, it uncovers ambivalence towards commerce in eighteenth-century France, distinguished by an awareness of its limits - slavery, piracy, and monopoly. Through a careful analysis of the History of the Indies (1780), the Enlightenment's best-selling history of comparative empires, Anoush Fraser Terjanian offers a new perspective on the connections between political economy, imperialism, and the Enlightenment. In discussing how a "politics of definition" governed the early debates about global commerce and its impact, this book enriches our understanding of the prehistory of globalisation.
Main Description
Histories of economics tend to portray attitudes towards commerce in the era of Adam Smith as celebrating what is termed doux commerce, that is, sweet or gentle commerce. Commerce and its Discontents in Eighteenth-Century French Political Thought proposes that reliance on this doux commerce thesis has obscured our comprehension of the theory and experience of commerce in Enlightenment Europe. Instead, it uncovers ambivalence towards commerce in eighteenth-century France, distinguished by an awareness of its limits - slavery, piracy, and monopoly. Through a careful analysis of the History of the Indies (1780), the Enlightenment's best-selling history of comparative empires, Anoush Fraser Terjanian offers a new perspective on the connections between political economy, imperialism, and the Enlightenment. In discussing how a "politics of definition" governed the early debates about global commerce and its impact, this book enriches our understanding of the prehistory of globalisation.
Table of Contents
Introduction: Commerce and its discontents
Bon luxe, mauvais luxe: a language of commerce
Doux commerce, commerce odieux: the commerce in humans
Cette odieuse piraterie: defining piracy
Indigne ateliers: monopoly and monopolists
Conclusion: Commerce and its discontents
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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