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India and the British Empire /
edited by Douglas M. Peers, Nandini Gooptu.
imprint
Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2012.
description
xiii, 366 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0199259887 (hbk.), 9780199259885 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2012.
isbn
0199259887 (hbk.)
9780199259885 (hbk.)
catalogue key
8666814
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2013-08-01:
Editors Peers and Gooptu's collection of essays on India and the British Empire seeks to introduce readers to the complex relationship between the colonizer and the colonized in British India. The editors specifically want to highlight new areas of research that have emerged in South Asian imperial history over the past 30 years. The volume's 14 essays cover a very eclectic array of research spanning political, environmental, economic, social, cultural, ideological, intellectual, and gender issues. The editors and authors hope to transcend the traditional binary oppositions that dominate Indian historiography, such as colonizer and colonized, imperialism and nationalism, and modernity and tradition. They do this by framing Indian history in terms of regional dynamics. However, there is a wide disparity in the quality of the essays. Some include original research and present new ideas, but other essays are little more than literature reviews of existing debates. Despite this shortcoming, the book as a whole succeeds in introducing new avenues of research in the field of British-Indian imperial history. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate students/faculty. P. P. Barua University of Nebraska at Kearney
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, August 2013
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Summaries
Long Description
South Asian History has enjoyed a remarkable renaissance over the past thirty years. Its historians are not only producing new ways of thinking about the imperial impact and legacy on South Asia, but also helping to reshape the study of imperial history in general. The essays in this collection address a number of these important developments, delineating not only the complicated interplay between imperial rulers and their subjects in India, but also illuminating the economic, political, environmental, social, cultural, ideological, and intellectual contexts which informed, and were in turn informed by, these interactions. Particular attention is paid to a cluster of binary oppositions that have hitherto framed South Asian history, namelycolonizer/colonized, imperialism/nationalism, and modernity/tradition, and how new analytical frameworks are emerging which enable us to think beyond the constraints imposed by these binaries. Closer attention to regional dynamics as well as to wider global forces has enriched our understanding of the history ofSouth Asia within a wider imperial matrix. Previous impressions of all-powerful imperialism, with the capacity to reshape all before it, for good or ill, are rejected in favour of a much more nuanced image of imperialism in India that acknowledges the impact as well as the intentions of colonialism, but within a much more complicated historical landscape where other processes are at work.
Main Description
South Asian History has enjoyed a remarkable renaissance over the past thirty years. Its historians are not only producing new ways of thinking about the imperial impact and legacy on South Asia, but also helping to reshape the study of imperial history in general. The essays in this collection address a number of these important developments, delineating not only the complicated interplay between imperial rulers and their subjects in India, but also illuminating the economic, political, environmental, social, cultural, ideological, and intellectual contexts which informed, and were in turn informed by, these interactions. Particular attention is paid to a cluster of binary oppositions that have hitherto framed South Asian history, namely colonizer/colonized, imperialism/nationalism, and modernity/tradition, and how new analytical frameworks are emerging which enable us to think beyond the constraints imposed by these binaries. Closer attention to regional dynamics as well as to wider global forces has enriched our understanding of the history of South Asia within a wider imperial matrix. Previous impressions of all-powerful imperialism, with the capacity to reshape all before it, for good or ill, are rejected in favour of a much more nuanced image of imperialism in India that acknowledges the impact as well as the intentions of colonialism, but within a much more complicated historical landscape where other processes are at work.
Main Description
South Asian History has enjoyed a remarkable renaissance over the past thirty years. Its historians are not only producing new ways of thinking about the imperial impact and legacy on South Asia, but also helping to reshape the study of imperial history in general. The essays in this collection address a number of these important developments, delineating not only the complicated interplay between imperial rulers and their subjects in India, but also illuminating the economic, political, environmental, social, cultural, ideological, and intellectual contexts which informed, and were in turn informed by, these interactions. Particular attention is paid to a cluster of binary oppositions that have hitherto framed South Asian history, namely colonizer/colonized, imperialism/nationalism, and modernity/tradition, and how new analytical frameworks are emerging which enable us to think beyond the constraints imposed by these binaries. Closer attention to regional dynamics aswell as to wider global forces has enriched our understanding of the history of South Asia within a wider imperial matrix. Previous impressions of all-powerful imperialism, with the capacity to reshape all before it, for good or ill, are rejected in favour of a much more nuanced image of imperialism in India that acknowledges the impact as well as the intentions of colonialism, but within a much more complicated historical landscape where other processes are at work.
Main Description
South Asian History has enjoyed a remarkable renaissance over the past thirty years. Its historians are not only producing new ways of thinking about the imperial impact and legacy on South Asia, but also helping to reshape the study of imperial history in general. The essays in this collection address a number of these important developments, delineating not only the complicated interplay between imperial rulers and their subjects in India, but also illuminating the economic, political, environmental, social, cultural, ideological, and intellectual contextswhich informed, and were in turn informed by, these interactions. Particular attention is paid to a cluster of binary oppositions that have hitherto framed South Asian history, namely colonizer/colonized, imperialism/nationalism, and modernity/tradition, and how new analytical frameworks areemerging which enable us to think beyond the constraints imposed by these binaries. Closer attention to regional dynamics as well as to wider global forces has enriched our understanding of the history of South Asia within a wider imperial matrix. Previous impressions of all-powerful imperialism, with the capacity to reshape all before it, for good or ill, are rejected in favour ofa much more nuanced image of imperialism in India that acknowledges the impact as well as the intentions of colonialism, but within a much more complicated historical landscape where other processes are at work.
Table of Contents
Introduction
State, Power, and Colonialism
The Indian Economy and the British Empire
Knowledge Formation in Colonial India
Colonialism and Social Identities in Flux: Class, Caste, and Religious Community
Nationalisms in India
Law, Authority, and Colonial Rule
Networks of Knowledge: Science and Medicine in Early Colonial India
Environment and Ecology under British Rule
Material and Visual Culture of British India
Literary Modernity in South Asia
Gendering of Public and Private Selves in Colonial Times
The Desi Diaspora: Politics, Protest, and Nationalism
The Political Legacy of Colonialism in South Asia
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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