Catalogue

COVID-19: Updates on library services and operations.

Problem fathers in Shakespeare and Renaissance drama /
Tom MacFaul.
imprint
Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2012.
description
viii, 259 p.
ISBN
1107028949, 9781107028944
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
author
imprint
Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2012.
isbn
1107028949
9781107028944
contents note
Machine generated contents note: 1. Introduction; 2. Staying fathers in early Elizabethan drama: Gorboduc to The Spanish Tragedy; 3. Identification and impasse in drama of the 1590s: Henry VI to Hamlet; 4. Limiting the father in the 1600s: the wake of Hamlet and King Lear; 5. After The Tempest; Conclusion.
abstract
"Fathers are central to the drama of Shakespeare's time: they are revered, even sacred, yet they are also flawed human beings who feature as obstacles in plays of all genres. In Problem Fathers in Shakespeare and Renaissance Drama, Tom MacFaul examines how fathers are paradoxical and almost anomalous characters on the English Renaissance stage. Starting as figures of confident authority in early Elizabethan drama, their scope for action becomes gradually more restricted, until by late Jacobean drama they have accepted the limitations of their power. MacFaul argues that this process points towards a crisis of patriarchal authority in wider contemporary culture. While Shakespeare's plays provide a key insight into these shifts, this book explores the dramatic culture of the period more widely to present the ways in which Shakespeare's work differed from that of his contemporaries while both sharing and informing their artistic and ideological preoccupations"--
catalogue key
8663704
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 241-250) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2013-05-01:
MacFaul (Merton College, Univ. of Oxford, UK) argues convincingly that the presentation of fathers as central figures in Elizabethan and Jacobean drama reflects a cultural crisis of patriarchal authority in England during these periods. After helpfully contextualizing previous studies, the author moves chronologically through four main paradoxical phases of fathers on the English stage, phases in which the divided father tries to unite his private and public roles. MacFaul points out that early modern dramatists present fathers as authority figures, but that the father's power becomes restricted in later plays, in which the father figure finally accepts this limitation. MacFaul considers the genres of comedy, tragedy, history, and romance, and he contends that these genres interact and affect each other: "as the father evolves ... the form of genre changes too." Shakespeare is the central focus, but MacFaul explores a wide spectrum of dramatists from this era and the key patterns in their works. Connecting and expanding on problem fathers in early modern drama, this interesting, wide-ranging study is well researched; the notes run to 21 pages, and the bibliography includes a wide sampling of primary works and broadly relevant secondary works. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. J. S. Carducci Winona State University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Macfaul argues convincingly that the presentation of fathers as central figures in Elizabethan and Jacobean drama reflects a cultural crisis of patriarchal authority in England during these periods....Connecting and expanding on problem fathers in early modern drama, this interesting, wide-ranging study is well-researched." --Choice
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, May 2013
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Description for Bookstore
Problem Fathers in Shakespeare and Renaissance Drama explores the central role of fathers in a wide range of Elizabethan and Jacobean plays. Placing Shakespeare among his contemporaries, this book enables an understanding of the development of his dramatic genres and shows how ideas of patriarchy evolved over the period.
Main Description
Fathers are central to the drama of Shakespeare's time: they are revered, even sacred, yet they are also flawed human beings who feature as obstacles in plays of all genres. In Problem Fathers in Shakespeare and Renaissance Drama, Tom MacFaul examines how fathers are paradoxical and almost anomalous characters on the English Renaissance stage. Starting as figures of confident authority in early Elizabethan drama, their scope for action becomes gradually more restricted, until by late Jacobean drama they have accepted the limitations of their power. MacFaul argues that this process points towards a crisis of patriarchal authority in wider contemporary culture. While Shakespeare's plays provide a key insight into these shifts, this book explores the dramatic culture of the period more widely to present the ways in which Shakespeare's work differed from that of his contemporaries while both sharing and informing their artistic and ideological preoccupations.
Table of Contents
Introduction
Staying fathers in early Elizabethan drama: Gorboduc to The Spanish Tragedy
Identification and impasse in drama of the 1590s: Henry VI to Hamlet
Limiting the father in the 1600s: the wake of Hamlet and King Lear
After The Tempest
Conclusion
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem