Catalogue


Nisei soldiers break their silence : coming home to Hood River /
Linda Tamura.
imprint
Seattle : University of Washington Press, c2012.
description
xx, 346 p.
ISBN
0295992093 (pbk. : alk. paper), 9780295992099 (pbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Seattle : University of Washington Press, c2012.
isbn
0295992093 (pbk. : alk. paper)
9780295992099 (pbk. : alk. paper)
catalogue key
8663373
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Linda Tamura is professor of education at Willamette University in Salem, Oregon. She is the author of The Hood River Issei: An Oral History of Japanese Settlers in Oregon's Hood River Valley.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2013-03-01:
Within internment historiography, Hood River is commonly known as the town whose American Legion post removed the names of 16 Nisei servicemen from a war memorial. While indeed one of the best illustrations of wartime anti-Nikkei racism, that action is but one episode in a much longer history of Japanese and Japanese American history in the region. Tamura (education, Willamette Univ.) has stepped out of her formal field of study to deliver an excellent history of the Hood River Nisei who served during WW II. Her book is backed by all of the expected (and nicely utilized) sources: government documents, contemporary media reports, letters, and a plethora of secondary sources. But what helps to distinguish the book as unique are the multitude of rare interviews with Nisei veterans, their families, and other Hood River residents. This oral history focuses primarily on events during and following the war, but its introductory chapters lay a nice groundwork for understanding how the Hood River Nisei grew up. Combat experiences, military and civilian racism, the confinement of certain Nisei for willful disobedience, and the quest for justice and redress are all thoroughly covered. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. J. T. Rasel Strayer University
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2012-06-18:
Tamura's cautionary tale depicts the unsung bravery and resilience of Japanese-American WWII veterans in the face of postwar racism. Focusing primarily on Japanese communities that settled in Oregon's Hood River Valley, Tamura (The Hood River Issei), a sansei (third-generation Japanese-American) and professor at Willamette University, relies both on oral histories and archival documents to trace the progress of issei (first-generation immigrants), the attempted assimilation of nisei (second-generation), and the conflict spurred by the war. If "Issei had remained 'common, unskilled laborers, they might have been tolerated,' " but the diligent, resourceful Japanese farmers became competitors in the eyes of white farmers. This fear triggered a movement to limit the settlers' rights and prevent their upward mobility, sanctioning restrictions on land ownership and citizenship. Considered "nice people so long as they are in a minority," when America went to war with Japan they were "treated as prisoners and criminals": issei parents were forced into internment camps while their nisei sons were enlisted in the Army. This important chronicle of the community's wartime contributions interweaves fact and anecdote, exposing incidents like the removal of 16 nisei soldiers' names from a local war memorial; Tamura provides an engaging outlet for a hidden voice, so "we can learn from and act to correct mistakes from the past." Illus. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
Reviews
Review Quotes
". . . an excellent history of the Hood River Nisei who served during WW II. Her book is backed by all of the expected (and nicely utilized) sources . . . what helps to distinguish the book as unique are the multitude of rare interviews . . . Highly recommended." - J. T. Rasel , Choice
"An important book about a shameful era in the history of the Columbia gorge. . . . Tamura uses interviews and newly uncovered documents to tell a shocking story." - Jeff Baker , The Oregonian
" Nisei Soldiers touches deeply into America's reckoning with race and bigotry and deserves a wide reading. The author offers a persuasive and compelling account of the treatment of Japanese Americans in peace and wartime." - William G. Robbins , Oregon Historical Quarterly , Summer 2013
"Professor Linda Tamura, author of Nisei Soldiers Break Their Silence: Coming Home to Hood River explains the national notoriety which Hood River, Oregon received after WWII, and how and why she broke the code of silence surrounding the situation." - KBOO Community Radio
"Tamura has done well to write this book, which strikes a blow at historical amnesia and resonates in Puget Sound country." - Mike Dillon , City Living , October 2012
"This important chronicle of the community's wartime contributions interweaves fact and anecdote . . . Tamara provides an engaging outlet for a hidden voice . . ." -Publishers Weekly , June 2012
"This important chronicle of the community's wartime contributions interweaves fact and anecdote . . . Tamura provides an engaging outlet for a hidden voice . . ." -Publishers Weekly , June 2012
This item was reviewed in:
Publishers Weekly, June 2012
Choice, March 2013
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This is a compelling story of courage, community, endurance, and reparation. It shares the experiences of Japanese Americans (Nisei) who served in the US Army during World War II, fighting on the front lines in Italy and France, serving as linguists in the South Pacific, and working as cooks and medics.
Main Description
Nisei Soldiers Break Their Silence is a compelling story of courage, community, endurance, and reparation. It shares the experiences of Japanese Americans (Nisei) who served in the U.S. Army during World War II, fighting on the front lines in Italy and France, serving as linguists in the South Pacific, and working as cooks and medics. The soldiers were from Hood River, Oregon, where their families were landowners and fruit growers. Town leaders, including veterans' groups, attempted to prevent their return after the war and stripped their names from the local war memorial. All of the soldiers were American citizens, but their parents were Japanese immigrants and had been imprisoned in camps as a consequence of Executive Order 9066. The racist homecoming that the Hood River Japanese American soldiers received was decried across the nation. Linda Tamura, who grew up in Hood River and whose father was a veteran of the war, conducted extensive oral histories with the veterans, their families, and members of the community. She had access to hundreds of recently uncovered letters and documents from private files of a local veterans' group that led the campaign against the Japanese American soldiers. This book also includes the little known story of local Nisei veterans who spent 40 years appealing their convictions for insubordination. Linda Tamura is professor of education at Willamette University in Salem, Oregon. She is the author of The Hood River Issei: An Oral History of Japanese Settlers in Oregon's Hood River Valley. "An important book about significant wartime events, a group of heroic World War II veterans, and the anguished experience of a community coming to grips with its own social sins. It is a superb oral history, a compelling community history, and a cautionary story about what happens when a democracy goes to war." -William L. Lang , Portland State University " Nisei Soldiers Break Their Silence speaks to contemporary concerns about multiculturalism and diversity with an absorbing and powerful story that encompasses both U.S. military and civilian life and strategically links the past with the present in a manner that vivifies what William Faulkner meant when he said that 'the past is not dead, it is not even past.'" -Arthur A. Hansen , Professor Emeritus of History and Asian American Studies, California State University, Fullerton
Table of Contents
Prefacep. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Oral History Methodologyp. xiii
Introductionp. xvi
Early Years
"Growing Up in Two Worlds": Balancing Japanese Americap. 5
"Nice People So Long as They Are in a Minority": The Japanese American Community in Hood Riverp. 18
World War II
"Why Didn't You Tell Us the War Was Coming?": Community Fallout from Pearl Harborp. 33
"Fighting for Good Uncle Sam": Nisei Enter The Militaryp. 48
"The Two-Sided Sword": Wartime Changes for Japanese American Familiesp. 62
"Getting Shot from Ahead of Us and Behind Us": War in the South Pacificp. 75
"From Somewhere in Europe": War in Europep. 89
"I've Got a Lot of Fighting to Do Right Here": Charged with Willful Disobediencep. 104
"Discard My Uniform for Good": The End of the Warp. 122
After The War
"No Japes Wanted in Hood River": The Hood River Situationp. 137
"Ninety Percent Are Against the Japs!": Veterans and their Families Returnp. 159
"You Could Feel It": Resettling in the Community and Elsewherep. 179
"Time Is a Good Healer": Rebuildingp. 190
"Guilty of Courage": Discipline Barrack Boys' Appealsp. 210
Today
"Opening the Closets of History": The Community Todayp. 231
No "Ordinary Soldiers": The Patriot Testp. 250
Afterwordp. 270
Notesp. 273
Selected Bibliographyp. 323
Indexp. 337
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem