Catalogue


Jews and Muslims in British colonial America : a genealogical history /
Elizabeth Caldwell Hirschman and Donald N. Yates.
imprint
Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co. Inc., c2012.
description
vi, 285 p. : ill., map ; 26 cm.
ISBN
0786464623 (softcover : alk. paper), 9780786464623 (softcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co. Inc., c2012.
isbn
0786464623 (softcover : alk. paper)
9780786464623 (softcover : alk. paper)
contents note
Mapmakers, privateers, and promoters -- Sephardim in the new world -- Virginia: first-and not so English-colony -- Massachusetts: pilgrims, Puritans, Jews, and Moors -- New York colony: Dutch, British, and Jewish -- Pennsylvania: Quakers and other Friends -- Maryland: Catholic in her tastes -- Huguenot South Carolina -- Georgia, the last colony -- Beacon of Freemasonry: Elias Ashmole, John Skene and early American lodges.
abstract
"From historical writings, ship manifests, wills, land grants, DNA testing, genealogies, and settler lists, and the widespread presence of Jews and Muslims in prominent positions in all of the original colonies, this work looks freshly at the early American experience, postulating that many initial US colonists were of Sephardic Jewish and Muslim Moorish ancestry" --Provided by publisher.
catalogue key
8661125
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 267-272) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Elizabeth Caldwell Hirschman is a professor of marketing at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, New Jersey. She has written widely on genealogy and ethnic identity. Donald N. Yates is principal investigator at a DNA testing company in Phoenix, Arizona. He has published popular and scholarly works in cultural and ethnic studies, history and population genetics.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2012-09-01:
This title is somewhat misleading, as Hirschman (Rutgers) and Yates (a businessman) reference brief biographical histories and speculative surname etymologies from the medieval period onward in an attempt to prove a definitive and highly influential crypto-Jewish presence in the American Colonies of Great Britain (and quite possibly the world). Through numerous misreadings of Christian/Puritan Hebraism, the authors leave much unproven and undercited, given the many definitive histories of early Jewish communities and crypto-Jews in America that are available. A more rigorous approach to revising the existing historical record with genetic and/or genealogical history would be needed in order to establish that "many of the initial colonists were of Sephardic Jewish and Muslim Moorish ancestry" (p. 1). For a comprehensive historical study on the topic, readers should consult Jacob Rader's The Colonial American Jew, 1492-1776 (CH, May'71) or Leon Huhner's Jews in America in Colonial and Revolutionary Times (1959). For a better understanding of the relationship between Puritans and Jews in early America, see Michael Hoberman's New Israel/New England: Jews and Puritans in Early America (2011). For an understanding of crypto-Jews in the Americas, see Hidden Heritage: The Legacy of the Crypto-Jews by Janet Liebman Jacobs (CH, Apr'03, 40-4755). Summing Up: Not recommended. J. A. Reuscher Pennsylvania State University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, June 2012
Choice, September 2012
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This study fundamentally challenges the traditional American storyline by postulating that many of the initial colonists were actually of Sephardic Jewish and Muslim Moorish ancestry.
Main Description
Americans have learned in elementary school that their country was founded by a group of brave, white, largely British Christians. Modern reinterpretations recognize the contributions of African and indigenous Americans, but the basic premise has persisted. This groundbreaking study fundamentally challenges the traditional national storyline by postulating that many of the initial colonists were actually of Sephardic Jewish and Muslim Moorish ancestry. Supporting references include historical writings, ship manifests, wills, land grants, DNA test results, genealogies, and settler lists that provide for the first time the Spanish, Hebrew, Arabic, and Jewish origins of more than 5,000 surnames, the majority widely assumed to be British. By documenting the widespread presence of Jews and Muslims in prominent economic, political, financial and social positions in all of the original colonies, this innovative work offers a fresh perspective on the early American experience.
Library of Congress Summary
"From historical writings, ship manifests, wills, land grants, DNA testing, genealogies, and settler lists, and the widespread presence of Jews and Muslims in prominent positions in all of the original colonies, this work looks freshly at the early American experience, postulating that many initial US colonists were of Sephardic Jewish and Muslim Moorish ancestry"--Provided by publisher.
Main Description
Americans have learned in elementary school that their country was founded by a group of brave, white, largely British Christians. Modern reinterpretations recognize the contributions of African and indigenous Americans, but the basic premise has persisted. This groundbreaking study fundamentally challenges the traditional national storyline by postulating that many of the initial colonists were actually of Sephardic Jewish and Muslin Moorish ancestry. Supporting references include historical writings, ship manifests, wills, land grants, DNA test results, genealogies, and settler lists that provide for the first time the Spanish, Hebrew, Arabic, and Jewish origins of more than 5,000 surnames, the majority widely assumed to be British. By documenting the widespread presence of Jews and Muslims in prominent economic, political, financial and social positions in all of the original colonies, this innovative work offers a fresh perspective on the early American experience.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. 1
Introductionp. 4
Mapmakers, Privateers and Promotersp. 7
Sephardim in the New Worldp. 25
Virginia: First-and Not So English-Colonyp. 45
Massachusetts: Pilgrims, Puritans, Jews and Moorsp. 60
New York Colony: Dutch, British and Jewishp. 83
Pennsylvania: Quakers and Other Friendsp. 104
Maryland: Catholic in Her Tastesp. 123
Huguenot South Carolinap. 140
Georgia, the Last Colonyp. 159
Beacon of Freemasonry: Elias Ashmole, John Skene and Early American Lodgesp. 173
Jewish Naming Practices and Most Common Surnamesp. 191
Rituals and Practices of the Secret Jews of Portugalp. 201
Muslim Rituals and Beliefp. 202
Customs and Belief of the Roma and Sintip. 203
Lists of Immigrants to Virginia 1585-1700p. 204
Lists of Settlers in Massachusettsp. 212
Names from The Town & Country Social Directory, 1846-1996p. 216
Pennsylvania Namesp. 217
Maryland Namesp. 223
South Carolina Namesp. 224
Lists of Settlers in Early Georgiap. 236
Notesp. 250
Referencesp. 267
Indexp. 273
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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