Catalogue


Salesman /
J.M. Tyree.
imprint
London ; New York : Palgrave Macmillan on behalf of the British Film Institute, 2012.
description
103 p. : ill. ; 19 cm.
ISBN
1844573877 (pbk.), 9781844573875 (pbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
series title
series title
imprint
London ; New York : Palgrave Macmillan on behalf of the British Film Institute, 2012.
isbn
1844573877 (pbk.)
9781844573875 (pbk.)
standard identifier
40021651481
contents note
Introduction -- 1. The path to Salesman -- 2. Performers, authors, directors -- 3. Americana -- Conclusion : reality and its discontents.
general note
"A BFI book published by Palgrave Macmillan."
catalogue key
8661112
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 100-103).
A Look Inside
Summaries
Main Description
Selected by the Library of Congress as one of the most significant American films ever made, Salesman (1966 - 9) is a landmark in non-fiction cinema, equivalent in its impact and influence to Truman Capote's 'non-fiction novel' In Cold Blood. The film follows a team of travelling Bible salesmen on the road in Massachusetts, Chicago, and Florida, where the American dream of self-reliant entrepreneurship goes badly wrong for protagonist Paul Brennan. Long acknowledged as a high-water mark of the 'direct cinema' movement, this ruefully comic and quietly devastating film was the first masterpiece of Albert Maysles, David Maysles and Charlotte Zwerin, the trio who would go on to produce The Rolling Stones documentary, Gimme Shelter (1970). Based on the premise that films drawn from ordinary life could compete with Hollywood extravaganzas, Salesman was critical in shaping 'the documentary feature'. A novel cinema-going experience for its time, the film was independently produced, designed for theatrical release and presented without voiceover narration, interviews, or talking heads. Working with innovative handheld equipment, and experimenting with eclectic methods and a collaborative ethos, the Maysles brothers and Zwerin produced a carefully-orchestrated narrative drama fashioned from unexpected episodes. J. M. Tyree suggests that Salesman can be understood as a case study of non-fiction cinema, raising perennial questions about reality and performance. His analysis provides an historical and cultural context for the film, considering its place in world cinema and its critical representations of dearly-held national myths. The style of Salesman still makes other documentaries look static and immobile, while the film's allegiances to everyday subjects and working people indelibly marked the cinema. Tyree's insightful study also includes an exclusive exchange with Albert Maysles about the film.
Long Description
Selected for preservation by The Library of Congress as one of the 25 most significant American films ever made, Salesman (1966-1969) is a landmark in nonfiction cinema, equivalent in its impact and influence to Truman Capote's 1965 'nonfiction novel' In Cold Blood. Salesman follows a team of travelling Bible salesmen on the road in Massachusetts, Chicago, and Florida, where their American dreams of entrepreneurship and self-sufficiency go badly wrong. One member of the team, Paul Brennan, reaches the end of his tether as the cameras roll. Long acknowledged as a high-water mark of the 'direct cinema' movement of the 1960s, this poignant and ruefully comic film was the first masterpiece of Albert Maysles, David Maysles, and Charlotte Zwerin, the trio who would produce Gimme Shelter (1970) as their next feature. As this study explains, Salesman heralded a novel experience for moviegoers, one that remains viable today. Based on the premise that dramas drawn from real life could compete with Hollywood extravaganzas, the film was critical in shaping 'the documentary feature' - a nonfiction genre specifically designed for theatrical release in cinemas and presented without voiceover narration, interviews, or talking heads. Pursuing a utopian dream of recording life with handheld equipment, and experimenting with eclectic methods and a collaborative ethos, the filmmakers produced a carefully-orchestrated narrative drama from outbursts of spontaneity. Salesman contains many puzzles to unravel and raises perennial questions about reality, artifice, and performance in nonfiction. Decades later, the style of Salesman still makes other documentaries look clumsy, immobile, and static, while its humane tone towards outsiders permanently influenced filmmaking.
Main Description
Released in 1968, the Maysles' Salesman is widely acknowledged as a landmark in documentary film. In his compelling and detailed study, J.M. Tyree discusses the film's various technical and artistic innovations, tracing their theoretical roots and enduring influence.
Long Description
Selected by the Library of Congress as one of the most significant American films ever made, Salesman (19669) is a landmark in non-fiction cinema, equivalent in its impact and influence to Truman Capote's 'non-fiction novel' In Cold Blood. The film follows a team of travelling Bible salesmen on the road in Massachusetts, Chicago, and Florida, where the American dream of self-reliant entrepreneurship goes badly wrong for protagonist Paul Brennan. Long acknowledged as a high-water mark of the 'direct cinema' movement, this ruefully comic and quietly devastating film was the first masterpiece of Albert Maysles, David Maysles and Charlotte Zwerin, the trio who would go on to produce The Rolling Stones documentary, Gimme Shelter (1970). Based on the premise that films drawn from ordinary life could compete with Hollywood extravaganzas, Salesman was critical in shaping 'the documentary feature'. A novel cinema-going experience for its time, the film was independently produced, designed for theatrical release and presented without voiceover narration, interviews, or talking heads. Working with innovative handheld equipment, and experimenting with eclectic methods and a collaborative ethos, the Maysles brothers and Zwerin produced a carefully-orchestrated narrative drama fashioned from unexpected episodes. J. M. Tyree suggests that Salesman can be understood as a case study of non-fiction cinema, raising perennial questions about reality and performance. His analysis provides an historical and cultural context for the film, considering its place in world cinema and its critical representations of dearly-held national myths. The style of Salesman still makes other documentaries look static and immobile, while the film's allegiances to everyday subjects and working people indelibly marked the cinema. Tyree's insightful study also includes an exclusive exchange with Albert Maysles about the film.
Main Description
Selected by the Library of Congress as one of the most significant American films ever made, Salesman (1966-9) is a landmark in non-fiction cinema, equivalent in its impact and influence to Truman Capote's 'non-fiction novel'In Cold Blood.The film follows a team of travelling Bible salesmen on the road in Massachusetts, Chicago, and Florida, where the American dream of self-reliant entrepreneurship goes badly wrong for protagonist Paul Brennan. Long acknowledged as a high-water mark of the 'direct cinema' movement, this ruefully comic and quietly devastating film was the first masterpiece of Albert Maysles, David Maysles and Charlotte Zwerin, the trio who would go on to produce The Rolling Stones documentary, Gimme Shelter (1970).Based on the premise that films drawn from ordinary life could compete with Hollywood extravaganzas, Salesman was critical in shaping 'the documentary feature'. A novel cinema-going experience for its time, the film was independently produced, designed for theatrical release and presented without voiceover narration, interviews, or talking heads. Working with innovative handheld equipment, and experimenting with eclectic methods and a collaborative ethos, the Maysles brothers and Zwerin produced a carefully-orchestrated narrative drama fashioned from unexpected episodes.J. M. Tyree suggests that Salesman can be understood as a case study of non-fiction cinema, raising perennial questions about reality and performance. His analysis provides an historical and cultural context for the film, considering its place in world cinema and its critical representations of dearly-held national myths. The style of Salesman still makes other documentaries look static and immobile, while the film's allegiances to everyday subjects and working people indelibly marked the cinema. Tyree's insightful study also includes an exclusive exchange with Albert Maysles about the film.
Description for Bookstore
Comprehensive and focused study of Salesman and its influence in the genre of documentary cinema

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