Catalogue


Have no fear : the Charles Evers story /
Charles Evers and Andrew Szanton.
imprint
New York : J. Wiley & Sons, c1997.
description
xviii, 333 p., [8] p. of plates : ill. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0471122513 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
New York : J. Wiley & Sons, c1997.
isbn
0471122513 (alk. paper)
general note
"A Robert L. Bernstein book."
catalogue key
865329
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 313-316) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 1996-11-01:
The former mayor of Fayette, Mississippi, and now, at 70-plus, a chancery court clerk, Evers recalls his boyhood and his relationship with martyred brother, Medgar. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 1996-11-11:
After his youngest brother, civil rights leader Medgar Evers, was murdered in 1963, outspoken, flamboyant Charles Evers carried the torch, running the Mississippi branch of the NAACP, integrating schools and hotels, organizing voter registration drives and boycotts, facing down the Ku Klux Klan. In 1969 he became the first black mayor in a century of the biracial Mississippi town of Fayette. A gripping autobiography, assembled by freelance writer Szanton from dozens of interviews with Evers, this first-person narrative brings to light an unsung, politically incorrect civil rights hero. Evers offers a searing account of growing up in Mississippi, "lynching capital of the country," in the 1920s and '30s. During WWII he fought in the invasion of the Philippines. Disc jockey, café proprietor, mortician, shopping center owner, he was also a numbers runner for the Chicago mob, a whorehouse owner and a bootlegger in the 1950s and early '60s. Father of eight daughters by four mothers, twice-divorced Evers has been a friend of Martin Luther King, Nelson Rockefeller, bluesmen Muddy Waters and B.B. King, Alabama's segregationist governor George Wallace (with whom he sought common ground), and informal adviser to JFK, LBJ, Robert Kennedy, Nixon. In 1980 he endorsed Reagan and later became a Republican. Today, as blunt and unpredictable as ever, he ridicules "hustler" Jesse Jackson, Jimmy Carter, Afrocentrism, Louis Farrakhan and blacks who blame their economic problems on whites. Author tour. (Jan.) FYI: Publication coincidentally ties in with the opening of Ghosts of Mississippi, a film about Medgar Evers and his family starring Whoopi Goldberg, Alec Baldwin and James Woods. (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Booklist,
Kirkus Reviews, November 1996
Library Journal, November 1996
Publishers Weekly, November 1996
Library Journal, January 1997
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Back Cover Copy
"Charles Evers is a personal hero of mine."-Jesse Jackson "Many people in Decatur were surprised to see sweet little Medgar Evers grow up to be such a warrior for civil rights. I wasn't surprised one damn bit. I saw the warrior in Medgar when he was a tiny boy. I helped create that warrior."-Charles Evers A fierce warrior in his own right, the brother of slain civil rights leader Medgar Evers fought on the front lines of the greatest struggle for America's heart and soul since the Civil War. Now, in a work of uncompromising honesty and power, Charles Evers re-creates the raw emotions of those times, conveying all of the rage and hope of a people rising against injustice and demanding equality. Have No Fear is charged with the passion, conviction, and vigorous spirit of a battle-scarred soldier who has met his foe and emerged victorious. Charles Evers grew up in Mississippi during the 1920s and '30s. Proud and headstrong, quick to action, he lived by his father's creed: Have no fear. Learning early about the harsh realities of poverty and unrelenting racism, and determined to erase the color line, he forged a special pact with his younger brother: "Medgar and I made a sacred oath as young boys: Whatever happened to one of us, the other would carry on." It was a pact that Charles would honor for the rest of his life. Driven from Mississippi, he made an illicit fortune in Chicago, and sent the money home to help his brother in the fight for civil rights. Shattered by Medgar's assassination in 1963, Charles seized his brother's mantle as head of the Mississippi NAACP. His volatile personality alienated many but inspired more-young and old, rich and poor, black and white. Always a shrewd businessman, he became an even shrewder politician, leading the biracial coalition that unseated an all-white Mississippi delegation at the notorious 1968 Democratic convention. Elected the first black mayor in Mississippi since Reconstruction, he made a courageous run for governor on the campaign promise "Evers for Everybody." A blunt, often blistering account of one man's lifelong battle for respect-for both himself and all Americans-Have No Fear is packed with insight and little-known details about Charles Evers's friends and allies-Martin Luther King Jr., John F. Kennedy, Robert Kennedy, Lyndon Johnson, Nelson Rockefeller, Thurgood Marshall, and Fannie Lou Hamer, among others. An unflinching witness to history, Charles Evers has been a driving, motivating force, a dedicated leader whose story is a landmark addition to the history of the civil rights years and their turbulent aftermath. "Charles Evers has given us one of the most extraordinary memoirs about race in America that I know. This holy sinner of the civil rights era, who kept company with mobsters, bootleggers, call girls, Kings, Kennedys, and Rockefellers has produced, with Andrew Szanton, a salient one-man's history of Mississippi and the United States before and after Brown v. Board of Education. The fascinating interplay of racial nihilism and political sagacity is reminiscent of the early Malcolm X and the mature Frederick Douglass."-David Levering Lewis Pulitzer Prize-winning author W. E. B. DuBois: Biography of a Race, 1868-1919 "Charles Evers is a gutsy American patriot and treasure. This book is an important, well-written slice of American history."-Dan Rather "Charles [Evers] shared Medgar's commitment and activism . . . Have No Fear tells the story of his life, which is also inevitably a portrait of his martyred brother, of the Mississippi civil rights movement, and of the nation itself."-Booklist (starred review) E-mail: szanton&atsign;fas.harvard.edu
Back Cover Copy
"Charles Evers is a personal hero of mine."-Jesse Jackson"Many people in Decatur were surprised to see sweet little Medgar Evers grow up to be such a warrior for civil rights. I wasn't surprised one damn bit. I saw the warrior in Medgar when he was a tiny boy. I helped create that warrior."-Charles EversA fierce warrior in his own right, the brother of slain civil rights leader Medgar Evers fought on the front lines of the greatest struggle for America's heart and soul since the Civil War. Now, in a work of uncompromising honesty and power, Charles Evers re-creates the raw emotions of those times, conveying all of the rage and hope of a people rising against injustice and demanding equality. Have No Fear is charged with the passion, conviction, and vigorous spirit of a battle-scarred soldier who has met his foe and emerged victorious.Charles Evers grew up in Mississippi during the 1920s and '30s. Proud and headstrong, quick to action, he lived by his father's creed: Have no fear. Learning early about the harsh realities of poverty and unrelenting racism, and determined to erase the color line, he forged a special pact with his younger brother: "Medgar and I made a sacred oath as young boys: Whatever happened to one of us, the other would carry on." It was a pact that Charles would honor for the rest of his life.Driven from Mississippi, he made an illicit fortune in Chicago, and sent the money home to help his brother in the fight for civil rights. Shattered by Medgar's assassination in 1963, Charles seized his brother's mantle as head of the Mississippi NAACP. His volatile personality alienated many but inspired more-young and old, rich and poor, black and white. Always a shrewd businessman, he became an even shrewder politician, leading the biracial coalition that unseated an all-white Mississippi delegation at the notorious 1968 Democratic convention. Elected the first black mayor in Mississippi since Reconstruction, he made a courageous run for governor on the campaign promise "Evers for Everybody."A blunt, often blistering account of one man's lifelong battle for respect-for both himself and all Americans-Have No Fear is packed with insight and little-known details about Charles Evers's friends and allies-Martin Luther King Jr., John F. Kennedy, Robert Kennedy, Lyndon Johnson, Nelson Rockefeller, Thurgood Marshall, and Fannie Lou Hamer, among others.An unflinching witness to history, Charles Evers has been a driving, motivating force, a dedicated leader whose story is a landmark addition to the history of the civil rights years and their turbulent aftermath."Charles Evers has given us one of the most extraordinary memoirs about race in America that I know. This holy sinner of the civil rights era, who kept company with mobsters, bootleggers, call girls, Kings, Kennedys, and Rockefellers has produced, with Andrew Szanton, a salient one-man's history of Mississippi and the United States before and after Brown v. Board of Education. The fascinating interplay of racial nihilism and political sagacity is reminiscent of the early Malcolm X and the mature Frederick Douglass."-David Levering Lewis Pulitzer Prize-winning author W. E. B. DuBois: Biography of a Race, 1868-1919"Charles Evers is a gutsy American patriot and treasure. This book is an important, well-written slice of American history."-Dan Rather"Charles [Evers] shared Medgar's commitment and activism . . . Have No Fear tells the story of his life, which is also inevitably a portrait of his martyred brother, of the Mississippi civil rights movement, and of the nation itself."-Booklist (starred review)E-mail: szantonatsign;fas.harvard.edu
Bowker Data Service Summary
The brother of assassinated civil rights leader Medgar Evers, Charles continued his brother's struggle. Now the former mayor of Fayette, Mississippi, provides his own account of the civil rights years in this dramatic memoir.
Long Description
"Charles Evers is a personal hero of mine."-Jesse Jackson "Many people in Decatur were surprised to see sweet little Medgar Evers grow up to be such a warrior for civil rights. I wasn2t surprised one damn bit. I saw the warrior in Medgar when he was a tiny boy. I helped create that warrior."-Charles Evers A fierce warrior in his own right, the brother of slain civil rights leader Medgar Evers fought on the front lines of the greatest struggle for America2s heart and soul since the Civil War. Now, in a work of uncompromising honesty and power, Charles Evers re-creates the raw emotions of those times, conveying all of the rage and hope of a people rising against injustice and demanding equality. Have No Fear is charged with the passion, conviction, and vigorous spirit of a battle-scarred soldier who has met his foe and emerged victorious. Charles Evers grew up in Mississippi during the 1920s and 230s. Proud and headstrong, quick to action, he lived by his father2s creed: Have no fear. Learning early about the harsh realities of poverty and unrelenting racism, and determined to erase the color line, he forged a special pact with his younger brother: "Medgar and I made a sacred oath as young boys: Whatever happened to one of us, the other would carry on." It was a pact that Charles would honor for the rest of his life. Driven from Mississippi, he made an illicit fortune in Chicago, and sent the money home to help his brother in the fight for civil rights. Shattered by Medgar2s assassination in 1963, Charles seized his brother2s mantle as head of the Mississippi NAACP. His volatile personality alienated many but inspired more-young and old, rich and poor, black and white. Always a shrewd businessman, he became an even shrewder politician, leading the biracial coalition that unseated an all-white Mississippi delegation at the notorious 1968 Democratic convention. Elected the first black mayor in Mississippi since Reconstruction, he made a courageous run for governor on the campaign promise "Evers for Everybody." A blunt, often blistering account of one man2s lifelong battle for respect-for both himself and all Americans-Have No Fear is packed with insight and little-known details about Charles Evers2s friends and allies-Martin Luther King Jr., John F. Kennedy, Robert Kennedy, Lyndon Johnson, Nelson Rockefeller, Thurgood Marshall, and Fannie Lou Hamer, among others. An unflinching witness to history, Charles Evers has been a driving, motivating force, a dedicated leader whose story is a landmark addition to the history of the civil rights years and their turbulent aftermath. "Charles Evers has given us one of the most extraordinary memoirs about race in America that I know. This holy sinner of the civil rights era, who kept company with mobsters, bootleggers, call girls, Kings, Kennedys, and Rockefellers has produced, with Andrew Szanton, a salient one-man2s history of Mississippi and the United States before and after Brown v. Board of Education. The fascinating interplay of racial nihilism and political sagacity is reminiscent of the early Malcolm X and the mature Frederick Douglass."-David Levering Lewis Pulitzer Prize-winning author W. E. B. DuBois: Biography of a Race, 1868-1919 "Charles Evers is a gutsy American patriot and treasure. This book is an important, well-written slice of American history."-Dan Rather "Charles [Evers] shared Medgar2s commitment and activism . . . Have No Fear tells the story of his life, which is also inevitably a portrait of his martyred brother, of the Mississippi civil rights movement, and of the nation itself."-Booklist (starred review) E-mail: szantonatsign;fas.harvard.edu
Main Description
"Have No Fear reminds us what it meant to live under a system where segregation was important enough to kill for and where being treated with dignity and respect was a whites-only entitlement." --The New York Times Book Review "A gutsy, American patriot and treasure . . . an important slice of American history."--Dan Rather "Charles Evers has given us one of the most extraordinary memoirs about race in America that I know. This holy sinner of the civil rights era, who kept company with mobsters, bootleggers, call girls, Kings, Kennedys, and Rockefellers has produced, with Andrew Szanton, a salient one-man's history of Mississippi and the United States before and after Brown v. Board of Education. The fascinating interplay of racial nihilism and political sagacity is reminiscent of the early Malcolm X and the mature Frederick Douglass." --David Levering Lewis "Truly spellbinding . . . relives the fear, desperation, and confrontation that marked the civil rights struggle." --The seattle times
Table of Contents
My Pact with Medgar?
Mama, Daddy, and Old Mark Thomas?
The Wall of Separation?
Whites Messed with Us, But We Couldn't Mess with Them?
Felicia?
Wheeling and Dealing at Alcorn?
Crossing the Line?
The Pure of Heart: Medgar Joins the NAACP Full-Time?
Terrible Years?
Chicago: The Chances I Took?
I Trusted to God and My .45 Pistol?
Turn Me Loose?
You Won't Die in Vain, Medgar?
Taking Over the Mississippi NAACP?
Two Lost Brothers?
Hate Goes on Trial?
Interrupting the Green?
The Next Step up the Ladder?
Lyndon Johnson Said, "We Shall Overcome." Black Power?
Running for Congress: Evers for Everybody?
Call Me "The Mayor." Fayette Was Our Israel?
A Black-Skinned Man Running for Governor?
Scolding Richard Nixon about Watergate?
Why I Became a Republican?
The Bridge That Carried Us Across?
Have No Fear?
Selected Bibliography?
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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