Catalogue


The flame of Miletus : the birth of science in ancient Greece (and how it changed the world) /
John Freely.
imprint
London : I.B. Tauris, 2012.
description
ix, 238 p., [8] p. of plates : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
9781780760513
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
author
imprint
London : I.B. Tauris, 2012.
isbn
9781780760513
catalogue key
8649726
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 226-235) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2013-06-01:
This fascinating book discusses a subject both known and unknown to general readers. Most students know that ancient Greece was the fount of knowledge, world views, and ideas that are part of the bedrock of Western civilization. Most people have heard of Plato and Aristotle and even Archimedes and Euclid. But not many may have heard of Eudoxus and Aristarchus. In this grand sweep of history, prolific writer Freely (formerly, Bosphorus Univ., Turkey) tells readers about the great scientific thinkers of that distant age. He narrates in greater detail than in most books the story of how the ancient flame lit by Thales and others survived the centuries after the fall of Hellas and Rome, resurfaced in the Islamic world, and was transmitted to western Europe. There it rekindled the spirit of scientific inquiry that led to the germination of modern science. Any mention of interactions with or inspirations from India or ancient Egypt is conspicuously absent. But the book does justice to the Islamic world as a messenger, catalyst, and contributor to modern science. The compression of so much information in so few pages in such a readable style is the work's greatest merit. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All academic and general audiences. V. V. Raman emeritus, Rochester Institute of Technology
Reviews
Review Quotes
"This is a magnificent book, covering an extraordinary range of topics and a vast sweep of time. John Freely has lived, written, and taught in Greece, Turkey, and Italy for a lifetime, and this experience has given him the rare ability to tell complex stories in a lucid and engaging manner. This is a book everyone should have." John Camp, Professor of Archaeology, ASCS, Athens Stavros Niarchos Foundation Professor of Classics, Randolph-Macon College
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, June 2013
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Summaries
Main Description
Miletus: one of the wealthiest and most important towns in ancient Greece. It was here, on the Aegean coast of Asia Minor, in the 6th century BC, that the great traditions of Greek science and philosophy sparked into life, setting in motion a chain of knowledge that would change the world, forever. This is the extraordinary story of Greek science from its earliest beginnings through its development in classical Athens and Hellenistic Alexandria and its subsequent diffusion to the wider world. Most histories of Greek science end with the collapse of the Graeco-Roman world in late antiquity and the closing of all classical schools of "pagan" philosophy in A.D. 529. But acclaimed historian John Freely here continues the story to tell of how the elements of Greek scientific and philosophical learning were adopted by the Islamic world and the transmission of Graeco-Islamic science to western Europe, as well as the preservation of Hellenic culture in Byzantium and its profound influence on the European renaissance and our modern world.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Miletus - one of the wealthiest and most important towns in ancient Greece - spawned the great traditions of Greek science and philosophy, setting in motion a chain of knowledge that would change the world forever. This book explains the extraordinary development of Greek science and its subsequent diffusion to the wider world.
Main Description
Miletus: one of the wealthiest and most important towns in ancient Greece. It was here, on the Aegean coast of Asia Minor, in the 6th century BC, that the great traditions of Greek science and philosophy sparked into life, setting in motion a chain of knowledge that would change the world, forever. This is the extraordinary story of Greek science from its earliest beginnings through its development in classical Athens and Hellenistic Alexandria and its subsequent diffusion to the wider world.Most histories of Greek science end with the collapse of the Graeco-Roman world in late antiquity and the closing of all classical schools of "pagan" philosophy in A.D. 529. But acclaimed historian John Freely here continues the story to tell of how the elements of Greek scientific and philosophical learning were adopted by the Islamic world and the transmission of Graeco-Islamic science to western Europe, as well as the preservation of Hellenic culture in Byzantium and its profound influence on the European renaissance and our modern world.
Main Description
Miletus: one of the wealthiest and most important towns in ancient Greece. It was here, on the Aegean coast of Asia Minor, in the 6th century BC, that the great traditions of Greek science and philosophy sparked into life, setting in motion a chain of knowledge that would change the world, forever. This is the extraordinary story of Greek science from its earliest beginnings through its development in classical Athens and Hellenistic Alexandria and its subsequent diffusion to the wider world. Most histories of Greek science end with the collapse of the Graeco-Roman world in late antiquity and the closing of all classical schools of 'pagan' philosophy in A.D. 529. But acclaimed historian John Freely here continues the story to tell of how the elements of Greek scientific and philosophical learning were adopted by the Islamic world and the transmission of Graeco-Islamic science to western Europe, as well as the preservation of Hellenic culture in Byzantium and its profound influence on the European renaissance and our modern world.
Table of Contents
List of Platesp. viii
Prefacep. ix
Mapp. x
Ionian Enlightenmentp. 1
Harmony and Logosp. 15
The One and the Atomp. 27
The School of Hellasp. 40
The Grove of Apollop. 54
Aristotle's Successorsp. 66
The Geometrization of Naturep. 77
Measuring Heaven and Earthp. 87
Moving the Worldp. 95
Mathematics, Astronomy and Geographyp. 103
Ingenious Devicesp. 114
The Art of Healingp. 124
Spheres within Spheresp. 134
Classical Twilightp. 145
From Byzantium and Islam to Western Europep. 156
The Renaissance: Byzantium to Italyp. 173
The Scientific Revolution: Greek Science Rebornp. 185
Eureka! Greek Science Rediscoveredp. 202
Notesp. 210
Bibliographyp. 226
Indexp. 236
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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