Catalogue

COVID-19: Updates on library services and operations.

UofT Libraries is getting a new library services platform in January 2021.
Learn more about the change.

Preservation and national belonging in eastern Germany : heritage fetishism and redeeming Germanness /
Jason James.
imprint
Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire ; New York, NY : Palgrave Macmillan, 2012.
description
ix, 216 p.
ISBN
0230320341 (hardback), 9780230320345 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire ; New York, NY : Palgrave Macmillan, 2012.
isbn
0230320341 (hardback)
9780230320345 (hardback)
contents note
Machine generated contents note: Acknowledgements -- List of Figures -- The Historic Cityscape and the Unified Nation -- Heimat Eisenach -- Cultural Heritage and Germanness -- Heritage Fetishism and the Heimat Imaginary -- Claiming Cultural Belongings -- Redemption and the Voice of Trauma -- List of works cited -- Index.
abstract
"Drawing on cultural anthropology and cultural studies, this book sheds new light on the everyday politics of heritage and memory by illuminating local, everyday engagements with Germanness through heritage fetishism, claims to hometown belonging, and the performative appropriation of cultural property"--
catalogue key
8649630
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 197-211) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
'Jason James has written a beautiful book, one that shows the massive virtues of anthropological research into national identity. Heritage is not just a context, but an active construction of real people in real time. Preservation and National Belonging in Eastern Germany is a nuanced portrait of people struggling to make meaning in a landscape fraught with competing pressures, and captures the complexities of that process exceptionally well.' - Jeffrey Olick, University of Virginia, USA
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Drawing on cultural anthropology and cultural studies, this book sheds new light on the everyday politics of heritage and memory by illuminating local, everyday engagements with Germanness through heritage fetishism, claims to hometown belonging, and the performative appropriation of cultural property.
Description for Bookstore
Explores the everyday politics of heritage and memory by illuminating local engagements with Germanness through heritage fetishism and the performative appropriation of cultural property
Long Description
Preservation and National Belonging in Eastern Germany explores the ways everyday citizens grapple with a difficult national past through heritage. East Germans struggle with an identity doubly burdened by Nazism and socialism, and many seek to manage these burdens by laying claim to a redemptive national past in the form of architectural heritage and the hometown cityscape. Understood as cultural and local rather than political and national, heritage and the hometown appear morally untainted - not only distinct from but also victimized by forces outside the boundaries of this uncorrupted Germanness. For these East Germans, redemption lies in claiming the role of hometown citizen committed to protecting an endangered cultural identity. Based on extensive ethnographic research, and drawing on cultural anthropology and cultural studies, the analysis sheds new light on the everyday politics heritage and memory by highlighting the dynamics longing, fantasy, fetishism, and local performance.
Table of Contents
List of Figuresp. vi
Acknowledgmentsp. vii
The Historic Cityscape and the Unified Nationp. 1
Heimat Eisenachp. 28
Cultural Heritage and Germannessp. 62
Heritage Fetishism and the Heimat Imaginaryp. 92
Claiming Cultural Belongingsp. 127
Redemption and the Voice of Traumap. 156
Notesp. 178
Works Citedp. 197
Indexp. 212
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem