Catalogue


The aesthetics of hate : far-right intellectuals, antisemitism, and gender in 1930s France /
Sandrine Sanos.
imprint
Stanford, Calif. : Stanford University Press, [2013].
description
xi, 369 p.
ISBN
0804774579 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780804774574 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Stanford, Calif. : Stanford University Press, [2013].
isbn
0804774579 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780804774574 (cloth : alk. paper)
contents note
"The crisis is in man" : the nation, the self, and cultural politics in the 1930s -- A genealogy of the far-right -- "Will we get out of French abjection?" : the politics and aesthetics insurgency of the young new right -- The absent author : Maurice Blanchot and the subjection of politics -- "Negroid Jews against white men" : Louis-Ferdinand Céline and the politics of literature -- The race of fascism : Je suis partout, race, and culture.
catalogue key
8647553
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [333]-354) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2013-05-01:
In this study of far-Right intellectuals in 1930s France, Sanos (Texas A & M Univ.-Corpus Christi) argues that the "Young New Right"--Brasillach, Celine, Rebatet, and others--perceived France as hopelessly decadent and besieged by threatening Others--most notably, the Jews. To escape this state of "abjection," fascist intellectuals embraced "aesthetics as politics," mobilizing a normative vision of aggressive masculinity to regenerate society and defend the boundaries of the self against threats of corruption and penetration. Sanos persuasively argues that the boundaries between avowed fascists and allegedly moderate conservatives were more porous, and the influence of the far Right on interwar French culture far more substantial, than usually acknowledged. She also contends that gender and race were conflated in French fascist demonology with the Jew, and especially archvillain Leon Blum, presented as sexually ambiguous and seductive. The book is heavy on theory, particularly Julia Kristeva's concept of abjection, and while the immediate historical context is well developed, contributing factors such as the brutalizing hecatomb of WW I and the threat of the 1920s "new woman" are suggested, but not explored. Nevertheless, Sanos has provided a vital resource for the intellectual history of interwar France. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Graduate students, faculty. D. A. Harvey New College of Florida
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Sanos has provided a vital resource for the intellectual history of interwar France . . . Highly recommended."D. A. Harvey, CHOICE
"This ambitious and conceptually sophisticated book moves beyond debates about whether the French far-right during the 1930s was 'really' fascist. In contrast to most historians, Sanos argues that the French far-right, while not 'worse' than other fascisms, was just different: it sought to provide the basis for a 'reasonable' racist anti-Semitism that would justify excluding Jews legally and symbolically from France rather than appealing, as they felt Hitler did, to myths."--Carolyn Dean, Brown University
"This book is an impressive piece of intellectual and cultural history. In an important intervention, the author illuminates how a range of extreme-right figures in 1930s France shared a racialized conception of the French nation. By historicizing these authors' thought, placing their writings in their wider political and journalistic context, Sanos moves beyond the narrow frame adopted by many literary scholars. The book's demonstration of the mutual constitution of antisemitism and colonial racism is one of its chief assets and achievements."--Judith Surkis, Institute for Advanced Study
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, May 2013
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
The Aesthetics of Hate examines the writings of a motley collection of interwar far-right intellectuals, showing that they defined Frenchness in racial, gendered, and sexual terms. A broad, ambitious cultural and intellectual history, the book offers a provocative reinterpretation of a topic that has long been the subject of controversy. In works infused with rhetorics of abjection, disgust, and dissolution, such writers as Maulnier, Brasillach, Celine, and Blanchot imagined the nation through figures deemed illegitimate or inferior--Jews, colonial subjects, homosexuals, women. Sanos argues that these intellectuals offered an "aesthetics of hate," reinventing a language of far-right nationalism by appealing to the realm of beauty and the sublime for political solutions. By acknowledging the constitutive relationship of antisemitism and colonial racism at the heart of these canonical writers' nationalism, this book makes us rethink how aesthetics and politics function, how race is imagined and defined, how gender structured far-right thought, and how we conceive of French intellectualism and fascism.
Main Description
The Aesthetics of Hate examines the writings of a motley collection of interwar far-right French intellectuals, showing that they defined Frenchness in racial, gendered, and sexual terms.
Main Description
The Aesthetics of Hate examines the writings of a motley collection of interwar far-right intellectuals, showing that they defined Frenchness in racial, gendered, and sexual terms. A broad, ambitious cultural and intellectual history, the book offers a provocative reinterpretation of a topic that has long been the subject of controversy. In works infused with rhetorics of abjection, disgust, and dissolution, such writers as Maulnier, Brasillach, Céline, and Blanchot imagined the nation through figures deemed illegitimate or inferiorJews, colonial subjects, homosexuals, women. Sanos argues that these intellectuals offered an "aesthetics of hate," reinventing a language of far-right nationalism by appealing to the realm of beauty and the sublime for political solutions. By acknowledging the constitutive relationship of antisemitism and colonial racism at the heart of these canonical writers' nationalism, this book makes us rethink how aesthetics and politics function, how race is imagined and defined, how gender structured far-right thought, and how we conceive of French intellectualism and fascism.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introductionp. 1
"The Crisis Is in Man": The Nation, the Self, and Cultural Politics in the 1930sp. 15
A Genealogy of the Far Rightp. 43
"Will We Get Out of French Abjection?" The Politics and Aesthetic Insurgency of the Young New Rightp. 75
The Absent Author: Maurice Blanchot and the Subjection of Politicsp. 118
"Negroid Jews Against White Men": Louis-Ferdinand Céline and the Politics of Literaturep. 158
The Race of Fascism: Je Suis Partout, Race, and Culturep. 194
Conclusionp. 245
Notesp. 261
Bibliographyp. 333
Indexp. 355
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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