Catalogue


Yuchi indian histories before the removal era /
edited and with an introduction by Jason Baird Jackson.
imprint
Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c2012.
description
xxxiv, 246 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0803240414 (pbk. : alk. paper), 9780803240414 (pbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c2012.
isbn
0803240414 (pbk. : alk. paper)
9780803240414 (pbk. : alk. paper)
catalogue key
8620846
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Jason Baird Jackson is an associate professor of folklore and American Studies at Indiana University. He is the author of Yuchi Ceremonial Life: Performance, Meaning, and Tradition in a Contemporary Native American Community (Nebraska, 2003).
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2013-05-01:
Recovering Yuchi histories poses a scholarly conundrum. As a tribe, they have no federal recognition, but researchers argue that there is a historic Yuchi, past and present. The ten contributions in this book illustrate this tension well. At times, the Yuchi seem significant by their absence; at other times, conversely, observers like William Bartram, John Wesley, or Benjamin Hawkins confirm their historical impact. Despite the isolation of their language, their separateness as a culture, and their reduction to three towns in contemporary Oklahoma, the Yuchi survive. The editor and contributors deserve congratulations for sustaining the nearly invisible Yuchi story line. Hope for future information rests in the questions raised by these and other scholars. This publication makes clear that the possibilities are enormous for ethnohistorians, historians, archaeologists, anthropologists, ethnologists, ethnographers, linguists, ethnobotanists, and geographers. The Yuchi exist in the sources, but their larger narrative remains to be extracted, much in the same way as the exciting essays in this collection. Given the prevailing mysteries about the Yuchi, this book seems compatible with the interests of all readers. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. J. H. O'Donnell III emeritus, Marietta College
Reviews
Review Quotes
"The editor and contributors deserve congratulations for sustaining the nearly invisible Yuchi story line. Hope for future information rests in the questions raised by these and other scholars. This publication makes clear that the possibilities are enormous for ethnohistorians, historians, archaeologists, anthropologists, ethnologists, ethnographers, linguists, ethnobotanists, and geographers."-J.H. O'Donnell III , Choice
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, May 2013
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
In this work, folklorist and anthropologist Jason Baird Jackson and nine scholars of Yuchi (Euchee) Indian culture and history offer a revisionist and in-depth portrait of Yuchi community and society.
Main Description
In Yuchi Indian Histories Before the Removal Era , folklorist and anthropologist Jason Baird Jackson and nine scholars of Yuchi (Euchee) Indian culture and history offer a revisionist and in-depth portrait of Yuchi community and society. This first interdisciplinary history of the Yuchi people corrects the historical record, which often submerges the Yuchi within the Creek Confederacy instead of acknowledging the Yuchi as a separate tribe. By looking at the oral, historical, ethnographic, linguistic, and archaeological record, contributors illuminate Yuchi political circumstances and cultural identity. Focusing on the pre-Removal era, the volume shows that from the entrada of Hernando de Soto into the American South in 1541 to the Yuchis' internal migrations throughout the hinterlands of the South and their entanglement with the Creeks to the maintenance of community and identity today, the Yuchis have persisted as a distinct people. This volume provides a voice to an indigenous nation that previous generations of scholars have misidentified or erroneously assumed to be a simple constituent of the Creek Nation. In doing so, it offers a fuller picture of Yuchi social realities since the arrival of Europeans and other non-natives in their Southern homelands.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. ix
List of Mapsp. x
List of Tablesp. xi
Introduction: On Studying Yuchi Historyp. xiii
Deep Time and Genetic Relationships: Yuchi Linguistic History Revisitedp. 1
Enigmatic Origins: On the Yuchi of the Contact Erap. 33
Reconsidering Chestowee: The 1713 Raid in Regional Perspectivep. 43
Yuchi in the Lower Savannah River Valley: Historical Context and Archaeological Confirmationp. 73
The Yuchi Indians along the Chattahoochee and Flint Rivers (1715-1836): A Synthesisp. 101
"They Look upon the Yuchis as Their Vassals": An Early History of Yuchi-Creek Political Relationsp. 123
Reconsidering Coalescence: Yuchi and Shawnee Survival Strategies in the Colonial Southeastp. 155
To the Backcountry and Back Again: The Yuchi's Search for Stability in the Eighteenth-Century Southeastp. 189
A Band of Outsiders: Yuchi Identity among the Nineteenth-Century Florida Seminolesp. 215
List of Contributorsp. 233
Indexp. 235
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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