Catalogue


The logic of slavery : debt, technology, and pain in American literature /
Tim Armstrong.
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2012.
description
x, 252 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
1107607817 (Paper), 9781107607811 (Paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2012.
isbn
1107607817 (Paper)
9781107607811 (Paper)
contents note
Machine generated contents note: Illustrations; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1. Slavery, insurance, and sacrifice: the embodiment of capital; 2. Debt, self-redemption, and foreclosure; 3. Machines inside the machine: slavery and technology; 4. The hands of others: sculpture and pain; 5. The sonic veil; 6. Slavery in the mind: trauma and the weather; Notes; Index.
catalogue key
8620822
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Description for Bookstore
Tim Armstrong explores the cultural metaphors underpinning slavery and its legacy using a range of American art and literature, focusing especially on the writings of African-American authors like Booker T. Washington, W. E. B. Du Bois, Ralph Ellison, and Toni Morrison.
Main Description
In American history and throughout the Western world, the subjugation perpetuated by slavery has created a unique "culture of slavery." That culture exists as a metaphorical, artistic, and literary tradition attached to the enslaved - human beings whose lives are "owed" to another, who are used as instruments by another, and who must endure suffering in silence. Tim Armstrong explores the metaphorical legacy of slavery in American culture by investigating debt, technology, and pain in African-American literature and a range of other writings and artworks. Armstrong's careful analysis reveals how notions of the slave as a debtor lie hidden in our accounts of the commodified self and how writers like Nathaniel Hawthorne, Rebecca Harding Davis, Booker T. Washington, W. E. B. Du Bois, Ralph Ellison, and Toni Morrison grapple with the pervasive view that slaves are akin to machines. Finally, Armstrong examines how conceptions of the slave as a container of suppressed pain are reflected in disciplines as diverse as art, sculpture, music, and psychology.
Table of Contents
Illustrations
Acknowledgments
Introduction
Slavery, insurance, and sacrifice: the embodiment of capital
Debt, self-redemption, and foreclosure
Machines inside the machine: slavery and technology
The hands of others: sculpture and pain
The sonic veil
Slavery in the mind: trauma and the weather
Notes
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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