Catalogue


Writing out of limbo : international childhoods, global nomads and third culture kids /
edited by Gene H. Bell-Villada and Nina Sichel ; with Faith Eidse and Elaine Neil Orr.
imprint
Newcastle upon Tyne, UK : Cambridge Scholars Pub., 2011.
description
ix, 486 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
ISBN
1443833606, 9781443833608
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Newcastle upon Tyne, UK : Cambridge Scholars Pub., 2011.
isbn
1443833606
9781443833608
contents note
Introduction / Gene H. Bell-Villada and Nina Sichel -- pt.1. Foundations. Third culture kids / Ruth Hill Useem and Richard D. Downie ; Cross-cultural kids : the new prototype / Ruth E. Van Reken ; Raised in the margin of the mosaic : global nomads balance worlds within / Norma M. McCaig ; Explaining differences : TCKs and other CCKs, American and Japanese TCKs / Ann Baker Cottrell -- pt. 2. Reflections. Finding home : John Liang ; Reframing / Faith Eidse ; Jubilee / Charity Schellenberg ; The colors and culture of home / Nancy Miller Dimmock ; A canary sings on the road to Athens / Kathleen Daniel ; Artist in transit : a fusion of art and identity / Cathleen Hadley ; Returning to my parents' foreign "home" / Emily G. Hervey ; Continental shifts / Anna Maria Moore ; Outsider / Nina Sichel -- pt. 3. Explorations. Lemonade for the Gringa : advice for and from teenaged global nomads / Patricia Linderman ; Vignettes from another perspective : when cultural hierarchies matter at an international school / Danau Tanu ; The religious lives of adult missionary kids / Nancy Henderson-James ; Echoes of loss : long-term grief and adaptation among third culture kids / Kathleen R. Gilbert and Rebecca J. Gilbert ; Four third culture kids : one portrait / Laila Plamondon ; Memory, language, and identity : the search for self / Liliana Meneses ; Finnish expatriate families and their children : a complementary viewpoint / Anu Warinowski ; Domestic students or foreign? : when U.S.-global nomads return "home" to college / Bruce La Brack ; Global nomads : cultural bridges for the future / Alice Shu-Hsien Wu -- pt. 4. Reconfigurations. Documenting mobility / Maureen A. Burns ; Khartoum Romeo, Delhi Juliet / Greg Clinton ; "I know who I am" / Leyla Rouhi ; The stranger self : a pattern in narrative / Elaine Neil Orr ; On Jean Rhys, Barbara Kingsolver, and myself : reflections on a problem that has no set name / Gene H. Bell-Villada ; Colonial mothers and cosmopolitan third culture kids : Doris Lessing's Under my skin / Alice Ridout ; Checked baggage : writing Unpacked / Elizabeth Liang ; On making BRATS / Donna Musil -- pt. 5. End paper. Le fran├žais / Maya Goldstein Evans.
catalogue key
8620644
 
Includes bibliographical references.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Gene H. Bell-Villada, born in Haiti of US parents, was raised in Puerto Rico, Cuba and Venezuela. A professor of Romance Languages at Williams College (Massachusetts), he is the author or editor of ten books, including a TCK memoir, Overseas American: Growing Up Gringo in the Tropics (2005). Nina Sichel is co-editor, with Faith Eidse, of Unrooted Childhoods: Memoirs of Growing Up Global (2004), the first collection of memoirs by Third Culture Kids and Global Nomads. Raised among expats in Venezuela, she relocated many times as an adult, and currently leads memoir and guided writing workshops near Washington, DC.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"This terrific and substantial volume is a vital step in clarifying the experiences, gifts, and struggles of those who grew up around the world, or with those who grew up elsewhere. I can't wait to teach with it." Wendy Laura Belcher, PhD, Professor of Literature, Princeton University "Well-grounded in classical perspectives and new visions of what it means to live in an intercultural world, the book offers a wonderful array of memoir, research, interviews, theory and even poetry. There's something for everyone here!" Anne P. Copeland, PhD, Director, The Interchange Institute "The selections here, varied as they are, share the quiet, profound, and rich experiences of people writing on the most innocent years, transcendent of cultural boundaries. Reading this book is a travel across the globe with an impressive group of worldly citizens." Morten Ender, PhD, Professor of Sociology, United States Military Academy at West Point "I recommend this book to all parents who are creating TCKs; to teachers and professors of TCKs; for general reading and understanding of the making of a citizen of the world; and, finally, to TCKs themselves, who will see that their experiences are shared with many others." Linda A. Garvelink, President, Foreign Service Youth Foundation This book is an essential contribution to the discussion of migration and the art of finding a home between borders. In vivid prose, the authors reveal the value of cultural negotiation and the complexity of identities formed on the margins. Neela Vaswani, Ph.D. Author of You Have Given Me a Country
Gene H. Bell-Villada, born in Haiti of US parents, was raised in Puerto Rico, Cuba and Venezuela. A professor of Romance Languages at Williams College (Massachusetts), he is the author or editor of ten books, including a TCK memoir, Overseas American: Growing Up Gringo in the Tropics (2005).Nina Sichel is co-editor, with Faith Eidse, of Unrooted Childhoods: Memoirs of Growing Up Global (2004), the first collection of memoirs by Third Culture Kids and Global Nomads. Raised among expats in Venezuela, she relocated many times as an adult, and currently leads memoir and guided writing workshops near Washington, DC."This terrific and substantial volume is a vital step in clarifying the experiences, gifts, and struggles of those who grew up around the world, or with those who grew up elsewhere. I can't wait to teach with it." Wendy Laura Belcher, PhD, Professor of Literature, Princeton University"Well-grounded in classical perspectives and new visions of what it means to live in an intercultural world, the book offers a wonderful array of memoir, research, interviews, theory and even poetry. There's something for everyone here!" Anne P. Copeland, PhD, Director, the Interchange Institute"The selections here, varied as they are, share the quiet, profound, and rich experiences of people writing on the most innocent years, transcendent of cultural boundaries. Reading this book is a travel across the globe with an impressive group of worldly citizens." Morten Ender, PhD, Professor of Sociology, United States Military Academy at West Point"I recommend this book to all parents who are creating TCKs; to teachers and professors of TCKs; for general reading and understanding of the making of a citizen of the world; and, finally, to TCKs themselves, who will see that their experiences are shared with many others." Linda A. Garvelink, President, Foreign Service Youth Foundation"This book is an essential contribution to the discussion of migration and the art of finding a home between borders. In vivid prose, the authors reveal the value of cultural negotiation and the complexity of identities formed on the margins." Neela Vaswani, Ph.D. Author of You Have Given Me a Country
Gene H. Bell-Villada, born in Haiti of US parents, was raised in Puerto Rico, Cuba and Venezuela. A professor of Romance Languages at Williams College (Massachusetts), he is the author or editor of ten books, including a TCK memoir, Overseas American: Growing Up Gringo in the Tropics (2005).Nina Sichel is co-editor, with Faith Eidse, of Unrooted Childhoods: Memoirs of Growing Up Global (2004), the first collection of memoirs by Third Culture Kids and Global Nomads. Raised among expats in Venezuela, she relocated many times as an adult, and currently leads memoir and guided writing workshops near Washington, DC.'This book will become a bible to anyone who truly wants to look inside the mind of the Third Culture Kid (TCK), the Military Brat, or the Missionary Kid. [...] Anyone writing about TCK issues needs this book; it's an invaluable reference.' Jo Parfitt, in 'Global Living Magazine', Issue 3 (October/November 2012), p. 56."This terrific and substantial volume is a vital step in clarifying the experiences, gifts, and struggles of those who grew up around the world, or with those who grew up elsewhere. I can't wait to teach with it." Wendy Laura Belcher, PhD, Professor of Literature, Princeton University"Well-grounded in classical perspectives and new visions of what it means to live in an intercultural world, the book offers a wonderful array of memoir, research, interviews, theory and even poetry. There's something for everyone here!" Anne P. Copeland, PhD, Director, The Interchange Institute"The selections here, varied as they are, share the quiet, profound, and rich experiences of people writing on the most innocent years, transcendent of cultural boundaries. Reading this book is a travel across the globe with an impressive group of worldly citizens." Morten Ender, PhD, Professor of Sociology, United States Military Academy at West Point"I recommend this book to all parents who are creating TCKs; to teachers and professors of TCKs; for general reading and understanding of the making of a citizen of the world; and, finally, to TCKs themselves, who will see that their experiences are shared with many others." Linda A. Garvelink, President, Foreign Service Youth Foundation"This book is an essential contribution to the discussion of migration and the art of finding a home between borders. In vivid prose, the authors reveal the value of cultural negotiation and the complexity of identities formed on the margins." Neela Vaswani, PhD, Author of You Have Given Me a Country
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Summaries
Main Description
Crossing borders and boundaries, countries and cultures, they are the children of the military, diplomatic corps, international business, education and missions communities. They are called Third Culture Kids or Global Nomads, and the many benefits of their lifestyle expanded worldview, multiplicity of languages, tolerance for difference are often mitigated by recurring losses of relationships, of stability, of permanent roots. They are part of an accelerating demographic that is only recently coming into visibility. In this groundbreaking collection, writers from around the world address issues of language acquisition and identity formation, childhood mobility and adaptation, memory and grief, and the artist's struggle to articulate the experience of growing up global. And, woven like a thread through the entire collection, runs the individual's search for belonging and a place called "home." This book provides a major leap in understanding what it's like to grow up among worlds. It is invaluable reading for the new global age.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Crossing borders and boundaries, countries and cultures, these are the children of the military, diplomatic corps, internatinal business, education and missions communities. This collection addresses issues of language acquisition and identity formation, childhood mobility, and adaptation in these childhoods.
Table of Contents
Definitionsp. x
Introductionp. 1
Foundations
Third Culture Kidsp. 18
Cross-Cultural Kids: The New Prototypep. 25
Raised in the Margin of the Mosaic: Global Nomads Balance Worlds Withinp. 45
Explaining Differences: TCKs and Other CCKs, American and Japanese TCKsp. 57
Reflections
Finding Homep. 80
Refrainingp. 92
Jubileep. 102
The Colors and Culture of Homep. 118
A Canary Sings on the Road to Athensp. 132
Artist in Transit: A Fusion of Art and Identityp. 152
Returning to my Parents' Foreign "Home"p. 165
Continental Shiftsp. 180
Outsiderp. 196
Explorations
Lemonade for the Gringa: Advice For and From Teenaged Global Nomadsp. 210
Vignettes from Another Perspective: When Cultural Hierarchies Matter at an International Schoolp. 220
The Religious Lives of Adult Missionary Kidsp. 232
Echoes of Loss: Long-term Grief and Adaptation among Third Culture Kidsp. 246
Four Third Culture Kids: One Portraitp. 263
Memory, Language, and Identity: The Search for Selfp. 278
Finnish Expatriate Families and Their Children: A Complementary Viewpointp. 291
Domestic Students or Foreign? When U.S.-Global Nomads Return "Home" To Collegep. 313
Global Nomads: Cultural Bridges for the Futurep. 332
Reconfigurations
Documenting Mobilityp. 356
Khartoum Romeo, Delhi Julietp. 371
"I Know Who I Am"p. 380
The Stranger Self: A Pattern in Narrativep. 391
On Jean Rhys, Barbara Kingsolver, and Myself: Reflections on a Problem That Has No Set Namep. 411
Colonial Mothers and Cosmopolitan Third Culture Kids: Doris Lessing's Under My Skinp. 426
Checked Baggage: Writing Unpackedp. 440
On Making BRATSp. 455
End Paper
Le fran├žaisp. 475
Contributorsp. 477
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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