Catalogue

COVID-19: Updates on library services and operations.

Indigenous Black theology : toward an African-centered theology of the African American religious experience /
Jawanza Eric Clark.
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2012.
description
xv, 186 pages.
ISBN
1137002824 (hbk.), 9781137002822 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2012.
isbn
1137002824 (hbk.)
9781137002822 (hbk.)
contents note
I once was lost, but now I'm found: the origins of Black Christian anti-African sentiment -- Only way to salvation: a Christological critique -- Overcoming religious and cultural amnesia: who are the ancestors? -- Indigenous Black theology: toward a theology of the ancestors -- Dead are not dead: the future of Black theology and Black church theologies.
catalogue key
8618806
 
Includes bibliographical references (pages [181]-184) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Jawanza Eric Clark is assistant professor of Global Christianity at Manhattan College.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This work is concerned with the way African American Christian formation, because of the acceptance of universal, absolute, and exclusive Christian doctrines, seems to justify and even encourage anti-African sentiment.
Description for Bookstore
This work is concerned with the way Black Christian formation seems to justify and even encourage anti-African sentiment
Main Description
For black people in America, Christian formation historically has come at a steep price - alienation from, even shame for, their African past. This alienation is primarily rooted in the acceptance of two orthodox Christian doctrines: the doctrines of original sin and Jesus Christ as exclusive savior. This work is concerned with the way Black Christian formation, because of the acceptance of universal, absolute, and exclusive Christian doctrines, seems to justify and even encourage anti-African sentiment. Clark seeks to address this problem by constructing a doctrine of the ancestors in an effort to legitimize indigenous African religious categories and offer an alternative theological anthropology for the future of Black theology.
Main Description
For black people in America, Christian formation historically has come at a steep pricealienation from, even shame for, their African past. This alienation is primarily rooted in the acceptance of two orthodox Christian doctrines: the doctrines of original sin and Jesus Christ as exclusive savior. This work is concerned with the way Black Christian formation, because of the acceptance of universal, absolute, and exclusive Christian doctrines, seems to justify and even encourage anti-African sentiment. Clark seeks to address this problem by constructing a doctrine of the ancestors in an effort to legitimize indigenous African religious categories and offer an alternative theological anthropology for the future of Black theology.
Table of Contents
Series Editors' Prefacep. vii
Author's Prefacep. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xiii
Introductionp. 1
"I Once Was Lost, But Now I'm Found": The Origins of Black Christian Anti-African Sentimentp. 21
The Only Way to Salvation: A Christological Critiquep. 55
Overcoming Religious and Cultural Amnesia: Who Are the Ancestors?p. 75
Indigenous Black Theology: Toward a Theology of the Ancestorsp. 101
The Dead Are Not Dead: The Future of Black Theology and Black Church Theologiesp. 127
Conclusionp. 163
Notesp. 169
Bibliographyp. 181
Indexp. 185
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem