Catalogue

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Modernism, imperialism, and the historical sense [electronic resource] /
Paul Stasi.
imprint
Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2012.
description
ix, 188 pages ; 23 cm
ISBN
9781107021440
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2012.
isbn
9781107021440
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Machine generated contents note: Acknowledgments; Introduction: imperial structures of feeling; 1. The persistence of the past: modernism vs. imperial time; 2. The Waste Land and the unreal center of capitalist modernity; 3. Cosmopolitan kulchur: The Cantos as world literature; 4. Turning production into consumption: Ulysses and the construction of postcolonial agency; 5. 'Moments of pride in England': Virginia Woolf and the forms of national subjectivity; Coda: the Edwardian lumber room; Notes.
general note
Revision of the author's doctoral thesis, University of California, Berkeley, 2006.
abstract
"Modernist art and literature sought to engage with the ideas of different cultures without eradicating the differences between them. In Modernism, Imperialism and the Historical Sense, Paul Stasi explores the relationship between high modernist aesthetic forms and structures of empire in the twentieth century. Stasi's text offers new readings of James Joyce, Ezra Pound, T. S. Eliot and Virginia Woolf by situating their work within an early moment of globalization. By combining the insights of Marxist historiography, aesthetic theory and postcolonial criticism, Stasi's careful analysis reveals how these authors' aesthetic forms responded to, and helped shape, their unique historical moment. Written with a wide readership in mind, this book will appeal especially to scholars of British and American literature as well as students of literary criticism and postcolonial studies"--
catalogue key
8604841
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This text provides a re-reading of canonical modernism, connecting it to imperialism without conflating it with imperialist practices.
Description for Bookstore
As early twentieth-century colonial expansion and industrialization helped connect corners of the world, modernist art sought to engage with ideas of different cultures without homogenizing their differences. This book offers new readings of key modernists like Joyce, Woolf, Eliot and Pound by situating their work within an early globalization moment.
Description for Bookstore
As early twentieth-century colonial expansion and industrialization helped connect the corners of the world, modernist art sought to engage with the ideas of different cultures without homogenizing their differences. This book offers new readings of key modernists like Joyce, Woolf, Eliot, and Pound by situating their work within an early moment of globalization.
Main Description
Modernist art and literature sought to engage with the ideas of different cultures without eradicating the differences between them. In Modernism, Imperialism, and the Historical Sense, Paul Stasi explores the relationship between high modernist aesthetic forms and structures of empire in the twentieth century. Stasi's text offers new readings of James Joyce, Ezra Pound, T. S. Eliot, and Virginia Woolf by situating their work within an early moment of globalization. By combining the insights of Marxist historiography, aesthetic theory, and postcolonial criticism, Stasi's careful analysis reveals how these authors' aesthetic forms responded to, and helped shape, their unique historical moment. Written with a wide readership in mind, this book will appeal especially to scholars of British and American literature as well as students of literary criticism and postcolonial studies.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgments
Introduction: imperial structures of feeling
The persistence of the past: modernism vs. imperial time
The Waste Land and the unreal center of capitalist modernity
Cosmopolitan kulchur: The Cantos as world literature
Turning production into consumption: Ulysses and the construction of postcolonial agency
'Moments of pride in England': Virginia Woolf and the forms of national subjectivity
Coda: the Edwardian lumber room
Notes
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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