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The Kaiserchronik [electronic resource] : a Medieval narrative /
Alastair Matthews.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2012.
description
vi, 198 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0199656991, 9780199656998
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2012.
isbn
0199656991
9780199656998
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
1. Introduction -- 2. Time, place, and space: Constantine the Great -- 3. Motivation: Charlemagne -- 4. Perspective: Otto the Great -- 5. Strands and embedding: Henry IV and Godfrey of Bouillon -- 6. Conclusion.
catalogue key
8603074
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [159]-193) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Alastair Matthews specializes in theoretical approaches to medieval German narrative literature. He was awarded his doctorate at the University of Oxford in 2009.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
A narratological analysis of the Kaiserchronik, or chronicle of the emperors, which provides an account of the Roman and Holy Roman emperors, from the foundation of Rome to the eve of the Second Crusade.
Long Description
This book presents a narratological analysis of the Kaiserchronik, or chronicle of the emperors, the first verse chronicle to have been written in any European vernacular language, which provides an account of the Roman and Holy Roman emperors from the foundation of Rome to the eve of the Second Crusade. Previous research has concentrated on the structure and sources of the work and emphasized its role as a Christian narrative of history, but this study shows that theKaiserchronik does not simply illustrate a didactic religious message: it also provides an example of how story-telling techniques in the vernacular were developed and explored in twelfth-century Germany. Four aspects of narrative are described (time and space, motivation, perspective, and narrative strands), eachof which is examined with reference to the story of a particular emperor (Constantine the Great, Charlemagne, Otto the Great, and Henry IV). Rather than imposing a single analytical framework on the Kaiserchronik, the book takes account of the fact that modern theory cannot always be applied directly to works from premodern periods: it draws critically on a variety of approaches, including those of Gérard Genette, Boris Uspensky, and Eberhard Lämmert. Throughout the book,the narrative techniques described are contextualized by means of comparisons with other texts in both Middle High German and Latin, making clear the place of the Kaiserchronik as a literary narrative in the twelfth century.
Main Description
The Kaiserchronik, or chronicle of the emperors, was the first verse chronicle to be written in any European vernacular. It provides an example of how stories were told in twelfth-century Germany, which this book describes from the perspective of modern narrative theory. The Kaiserchronik's accounts of figures such as Charlemagne make it significant in a European context, not least because, as this book suggests, writing about the historical pastwas a first step in the development of techniques that would later feature in stories that were not factual - in other words, the emergence of fictionality.
Main Description
This book presents a narratological analysis of the Kaiserchronik, or chronicle of the emperors, the first verse chronicle to have been written in any European vernacular language, which provides an account of the Roman and Holy Roman emperors from the foundation of Rome to the eve of theSecond Crusade. Previous research has concentrated on the structure and sources of the work and emphasized its role as a Christian narrative of history, but this study shows that the Kaiserchronik does not simply illustrate a didactic religious message: it also provides an example of howstory-telling techniques in the vernacular were developed and explored in twelfth-century Germany. Four aspects of narrative are described (time and space, motivation, perspective, and narrative strands), each of which is examined with reference to the story of a particular emperor (Constantine the Great, Charlemagne, Otto the Great, and Henry IV). Rather than imposing a single analyticalframework on the Kaiserchronik, the book takes account of the fact that modern theory cannot always be applied directly to works from premodern periods: it draws critically on a variety of approaches, including those of Gerard Genette, Boris Uspensky, and Eberhard Lammert. Throughout the book, thenarrative techniques described are contextualized by means of comparisons with other texts in both Middle High German and Latin, making clear the place of the Kaiserchronik as a literary narrative in the twelfth century.
Table of Contents
List of Abbreviationsp. ix
Note on Translations and Citationsp. x
Introductionp. 1
Time, Place, and Space: Constantine the Greatp. 26
Motivation: Charlemagnep. 58
Perspective: Otto the Greatp. 90
Strands and Embedding: Henry IV and Godfrey of Bouillonp. 118
Conclusionp. 150
Referencesp. 159
Indexp. 195
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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