Catalogue

COVID-19: Updates on library services and operations.

The Egypt game /
Zilpha Keatley Snyder ; drawings by Alton Raible.
imprint
New York : Dell, 1986.
description
215 p. : ill.
ISBN
0440422256
format(s)
Book
Holdings
Subjects
geographic term
More Details
imprint
New York : Dell, 1986.
isbn
0440422256
general note
"A Yearling book".
catalogue key
860183
A Look Inside
Awards
This item was nominated for the following awards:
Newbery Medal, USA, 1968 : Nominated
Excerpts
Excerpt from Book
An Excerpt fromThe Egypt Game All through the month of August, Melanie and April were together almost every day. They played the paper-families game and other games, both in the Rosses' apartment and in Caroline's. They took Marshall for walks and to the park while Mrs. Ross was gone to her class, and almost every day they went to the library. It was in the library in August that the seeds were planted that grew into the Egypt Game in September in the Professor's deserted yard. It all started when April found a new book about Egypt, an especially interesting one about the life of a young pharaoh. She passed it on to Melanie, and with it a lot of interest in all sorts of ancient stuff. Melanie was soon as fascinated by the valley of the Nile as April had been. Before long, with the help of a sympathetic librarian, they had found and read just about everything the library had to offer on Egypt--both fact and fiction. They read about Egypt in the library during the day, and at home in the evening, and in bed late at night when they were supposed to be asleep. Then in the mornings while they helped each other with their chores they discussed the things they had found out. In a very short time they had accumulated all sorts of fascinating facts about tombs and temples, pharaohs and pyramids, mummies and monoliths, and dozens of other exotic topics. They decide
First Chapter
An Excerpt fromThe Egypt Game

            All through the month of August, Melanie and April were together almost
            every day. They played the paper-families game and other games, both
            in the Rosses' apartment and in Caroline's. They took Marshall for
            walks and to the park while Mrs. Ross was gone to her class, and almost
            every day they went to the library. It was in the library in August
            that the seeds were planted that grew into the Egypt Game in September
            in the Professor's deserted yard.

            It all started when April found a new book about Egypt, an especially
            interesting one about the life of a young pharaoh. She passed it on
            to Melanie, and with it a lot of interest in all sorts of ancient
            stuff. Melanie was soon as fascinated by the valley of the Nile as
            April had been. Before long, with the help of a sympathetic librarian,
            they had found and read just about everything the library had to offer
            on Egypt--both fact and fiction.

            They read about Egypt in the library during the day, and at home in
            the evening, and in bed late at night when they were supposed to be
            asleep. Then in the mornings while they helped each other with their
            chores they discussed the things they had found out. In a very short
            time they had accumulated all sorts of fascinating facts about tombs
            and temples, pharaohs and pyramids, mummies and monoliths, and dozens
            of other exotic topics. They decided that the Egyptians couldn't have
            been more interesting if they had done it on purpose. Everything,
            from their love of beauty and mystery, to their fascinating habit
            of getting married when they were only eleven years old, made good
            stuff to talk about. By the end of the month, April and Melanie were
            beginning work on their own alphabet of hieroglyphics for writing
            secret messages, and at the library they were beginning to be called
            the Egypt Girls.

   
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 1986-03-21:
Two girls get involved in an elaborate ``Egypt game,'' a fantasy game that soon leads to strange, unexplainable happenings. PW called the characters in Snyder's Newbery Honor winner ``true originals.'' (8-12) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Publishers Weekly, March 1986
Booklist, May 1989
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Back Cover Copy
The first time Melanie Ross meets April Hall, she's not sure they have anything in common. But she soon discovers that they both love anything to do with ancient Egypt. When they stumble upon a deserted storage yard behind the A-Z Antiques and Curio Shop, Melanie and April decide it's the perfect spot for the Egypt Game. Before long there are six Egyptians instead of two. After school and on weekends they all meet to wear costumes, hold ceremonies, and work on their secret code. Everyone thinks it's just a game, until strange things begin happening to the players. Has the Egypt Game gone too far?
Description for Library
A group of children, entranced with the study of Egypt, play their own Egypt game, are visited by a secret oracle, become involved in a murder, and befriend the Professor of the local junk shop.
Main Description
The first time Melanie Ross meets April Hall, she's not sure they'll have anything in common. But she soon discovers that they both love anything to do with ancient Egypt. When they stumble upon a deserted storage yard behind the A-Z Antiques and Curio Shop, Melanie and April decide it's the perfect spot for Egypt Game. Before long there are six Egyptians instead of two. After school and on weekends they all meet to wear costumes, hold ceremonies, and work on their secret code. Everyone thinks it's just a game, until strange things begin happening to the players. Has the Egypt Game gone too far?
Main Description
When Melanie Ross and April Hall begin to play the Egypt Game, everyone thinks it's just a game until strange things begin happening to the players. Has the Egypt Game gone too far?

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem