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Entangled by white supremacy [electronic resource] : reform in World War I-era South Carolina /
Janet G. Hudson.
imprint
Lexington : University Press of Kentucky, c2009.
description
x, 389 p. : maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0813125022 (hardcover : alk. paper), 9780813125022 (hardcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Lexington : University Press of Kentucky, c2009.
isbn
0813125022 (hardcover : alk. paper)
9780813125022 (hardcover : alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8597562
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 355-373) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2010-02-01:
World War I unleashed impulses that profoundly shaped the 1920s. While a truism for economic developments, historians have not always given importance to the war's social and political implications. This political history of postwar South Carolina offers insight. The euphoria of assisting the Allies' triumph in the "war to end all wars" yielded racial pride as African American troops returned home with new visions for South Carolina. A suppressed agenda for civil rights reform among African Americans gained strength only to be countered by what is often termed Southern progressivism--a reform for whites only. Thus, while there were reforms and progress in South Carolina during the 1920s, African American education, voting rights, and economic opportunities took a decided back seat to the politics of white supremacy. The greatest irony of all was that in the midst of a frustrating absence of reform for blacks, there was strong resistance to the out-migration that some African Americans sought as a means to a better life in northern cities. Hudson (Univ. of South Carolina) tells an important story, albeit a story that is replicated in other southern states. The book is rich in detail, and the supporting documentation is strong. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. T. F. Armstrong Louisiana State University at Alexandria
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Entangle by White Supremacy is a clearly written and well-organized exploration of the politics of race in a state with a black majority. Like Frederick Olmsted and the rural sociologists of the early twentieth century, Hudson reminds us of the cost that society pays for the relentless subordination of any of its constituent parts.-" -- The Journal of American History
""Entangled by White Supremacy" is a carefully researched and exhasutive work. Its writing is largely clear and the argumentation effective. The book is a worthy addition to the historiography of South Carolina politics." -- Marko Maunula, Georgia Historical Quarterly
"Entangled by White Supremacy takes a unique look at how the war reshaped social processes and the racial dynamic, and at the impact of the war on reform. I know of no other study that accomplishes these things in the existing literature."--William A. Link, Richard J. Milbauer Professor of History, University of Florida
"Entangled by White Supremacytakes a unique look at how the war reshaped social processes and the racial dynamic, and at the impact of the war on reform. I know of no other study that accomplishes these things in the existing literature."-- William A. Link, Richard J. Milbauer Professor of History, University of Florida
""Entangled by White Supremacy takes a unique look at how the war reshaped social processes and the racial dynamic, and at the impact of the war on reform. I know of no other study that accomplishes these things in the existing literature."--William A. Link, Richard J. Milbauer Professor of History, University of Florida" --
""Entangled by White Supremacy takes a unique look at how the war reshaped social processes and the racial dynamic, and at the impact of the war on reform. I know of no other study that accomplishes these things in the existing literature."--William A. Link, Richard J. Milbauer Professor of History, University of Florida" -- William A. Link, Richard J. Milbauer Professor of History, University of Florida
"Hudson's book is well written and it offers excellent insight into the complexities of white supremacy in World War I -- era South Carolina." -- North Carolina Historical Review
"Hudson's interesting book provides further examples of the power of localism to frustrate progressive reform in the early twentieth-century South." -- American Historical Review
"Hudson tells an important story, albeit a story that is replicated in other southern states. The book is rich in detail, and the supporting documentation is strong." -- Social & Behavioral Sciences
"In this clear-eyed, carefully told, and compelling book, Janet Hudson adds a crucial early chapter to the long history of the civil rights movement and white resistance to change in the South.--Bryant Simon, author of A Fabric of Defeat: The Politics of South Carolina Millhands, 1910-1948" --
"In this clear-eyed, carefully told, and compelling book, Janet Hudson adds a crucial early chapter to the long history of the civil rights movement and white resistance to change in the South.--Bryant Simon, author of A Fabric of Defeat: The Politics of South Carolina Millhands, 1910-1948" -- Bryant Simon
"Returning to World War I-era South Carolina, historian Janet Hudson explores the complex nature of white supremacy and the impact of World War I on white supremacist organizing in South Carolina." -- The University of Manchester
"Successfully brings to light new and valuable information on the challenges to reform in South Carolina." --Charles J. Holden, author of In the Great Maelstrom: Conservatives in Post-Civil War South Carolina
"Successfully brings to light new and valuable information on the challenges to reform in South Carolina." --Charles J. Holden, author ofIn the Great Maelstrom: Conservatives in Post-Civil War South Carolina
""Successfully brings to light new and valuable information on the challenges to reform in South Carolina." --Charles J. Holden, author of In the Great Maelstrom: Conservatives in Post-Civil War South Carolina" --
""Successfully brings to light new and valuable information on the challenges to reform in South Carolina." --Charles J. Holden, author of In the Great Maelstrom: Conservatives in Post-Civil War South Carolina" -- Charles J. Holden
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, February 2010
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
In this work, Hudson analyses WWI-era South Carolina, a state whose white minority maintained political power by enforcing white supremacy over an African American majority. Hudson looks at the influence of a multifaceted ideology of white supremacy that became a barrier to the region's progress.
Description for Bookstore
InEntangled by White Supremacy: Reform in World War I-era South Carolina, Janet G. Hudson analyzes World War I-era South Carolina, a state whose white minority maintained political power by rigidly enforcing white supremacy over its African American majority. Considering the aspirations and actions of both black and white reformers, Hudson looks at African American activism, the vigor of white reformers, and the influence of a multifaceted ideology of white supremacy that became a barrier to the region's progress. Detailing African American resistance to white supremacy long before the traditional Civil Rights era, the book illuminates the critical nature of South Carolina to the civil rights movement and to the later demise of Progressivism.
Main Description
Despite its significance in world and American history, the World War I era is seldom identified as a turning point in southern history, as it failed to trigger substantial economic, political, or social change in the South. Yet in 1917, black and white reformers in South Carolina saw their world on the brink of momentous change. In a state politically controlled by a white minority, the war era incited oppositional movements. As South Carolina's economy benefited from the war, white reformers sought to use their newfound prosperity to better the state's education system and economy and to provide white citizens with a better standard of living. Black reformers, however, channeled the feelings of hope instilled by a war that would "make the world safe for democracy" into efforts that challenged the structures of the status quo. InEntangled by White Supremacy: Reform in World War Iera South Carolina, historian Janet G. Hudson examines the complex racial and social dynamics at play during this pivotal period of U.S. history. With critical study of the early war mobilization efforts, public policy debates, and the state's political culture, Hudson illustrates how the politics of white supremacy hindered the reform efforts of both white and black activists. The World War I period was a complicated time in South Carolinaan era of prosperity and hope as well as fear and anxiety. As African Americans sought to change the social order, white reformers confronted the realization that their newfound economic opportunities could also erode their control. Hudson details how white supremacy formed an impenetrable barrier to progress in the region. Entangled by White Supremacyexplains why white southerners failed to construct a progressive society by revealing the incompatibility of white reformers' twin goals of maintaining white supremacy and achieving progressive reform. In addition, Hudson offers insight into the social history of South Carolina and the development of the state's crucial role in the civil rights era to come.
Main Description
Despite its significance in world and American history, the World War I era is seldom identified as a turning point in southern history, as it failed to trigger substantial economic, political, or social change in the South. Yet in 1917, black and white reformers in South Carolina saw their world on the brink of momentous change. In a state politically controlled by a white minority, the war era incited oppositional movements. As South Carolina's economy benefited from the war, white reformers sought to use their newfound prosperity to better the state's education system and economy and to provide white citizens with a better standard of living. Black reformers, however, channeled the feelings of hope instilled by a war that would "make the world safe for democracy" into efforts that challenged the structures of the status quo. In Entangled by White Supremacy: Reform in World War I--era South Carolina, historian Janet G. Hudson examines the complex racial and social dynamics at play during this pivotal period of U.S. history. With critical study of the early war mobilization efforts, public policy debates, and the state's political culture, Hudson illustrates how the politics of white supremacy hindered the reform efforts of both white and black activists. The World War I period was a complicated time in South Carolina -- an era of prosperity and hope as well as fear and anxiety. As African Americans sought to change the social order, white reformers confronted the realization that their newfound economic opportunities could also erode their control. Hudson details how white supremacy formed an impenetrable barrier to progress in the region. Entangled by White Supremacy explains why white southerners failed to construct a progressive society by revealing the incompatibility of white reformers' twin goals of maintaining white supremacy and achieving progressive reform. In addition, Hudson offers insight into the social history of South Carolina and the development of the state's crucial role in the civil rights era to come.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. viii
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introductionp. 1
Wartime Challenges
Black Hopep. 11
White Resolvep. 41
Mobilization for Warp. 73
Interracial Cooperation, 1917-1919p. 101
Interracial Tension, 1919p. 120
The Great Migrationp. 148
The Politics of White Supremacy
A Reform Coalitionp. 179
Woman Suffragep. 206
Funding Reformp. 223
Taxing Wealthp. 242
Financing Educational Reformp. 261
Legacy of Reformp. 282
Conclusionp. 306
Notesp. 314
Bibliographyp. 355
Indexp. 374
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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