Catalogue


The Anglo-Scottish border and the shaping of identity, 1300-1600 [electronic resource] /
edited by Mark P. Bruce and Katherine H. Terrell.
imprint
New York, NY : Palgrave Macmillan, 2012.
description
xii, 235 pages ; 22 cm.
ISBN
9780230110861
format(s)
Book
More Details
series title
imprint
New York, NY : Palgrave Macmillan, 2012.
isbn
9780230110861
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
abstract
"The Anglo-Scottish border in the late medieval and early modern period was a highly contested region, a militarized zone that was also a place of cultural contact and exchange. The contributors to this volume explore the role of this borderland in the construction of both Scottish and English identities, seeking insight into the role that Scotland and England played in one another's imaginations. Texts that originate in, pass through, or comment on the Anglo-Scottish borderland reveal the border as a crucial third term in the articulation of Scottish and English national consciousness and cultural identity"--
"Theorizing the Borders: Scotland and the Shaping of Identity in Medieval Britain explores the roles that Scotland and England play in one another's imaginations. This collection of essays brings together eminent scholars and emerging voices from the frequently divergent fields of English and Scottish medieval studies to address such questions as: How do subjects on both sides of the Anglo-Scottish border define themselves in relation to one another? In what ways do they influence each other's sense of historical, cultural, and national identity? What stories do they tell about one another, and to what ends? How does the shifting political balance--as well as the shifting border--between the two kingdoms complicate notions of Scottishness and Englishness? What happens to important texts, genres, and even poetic forms when they cross this border? How do texts produced in the Anglo-Scottish borderlands transform mainstream notions of Scottish and English identities?"--
catalogue key
8591715
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This text explores the roles that Scotland and England play in one another's imaginations. The collection of essays brings together eminent scholars and emerging voices from the frequently divergent fields of English and Scottish medieval studies.
Description for Bookstore
Explores the role of this borderland in the construction of both Scottish and English identities, seeking insight into the role that Scotland and England played in one another's imaginations
Long Description
The Anglo-Scottish border in the late medieval and early modern period was a highly contested region, a militarized zone that was also a place of cultural contact and exchange. The contributors to this volume explore the role of this borderland in the construction of both Scottish and English identities, seeking insight into the role that Scotland and England played in one another's imaginations. Texts that originate in, pass through, or comment on the Anglo-SCottish borderland reveal the border as a crucial third term in the articulation of Scottish and English national consciousness and cultural identity.
Library of Congress Summary
"Theorizing the Borders: Scotland and the Shaping of Identity in Medieval Britain explores the roles that Scotland and England play in one another's imaginations. This collection of essays brings together eminent scholars and emerging voices from the frequently divergent fields of English and Scottish medieval studies to address such questions as: How do subjects on both sides of the Anglo-Scottish border define themselves in relation to one another? In what ways do they influence each other's sense of historical, cultural, and national identity? What stories do they tell about one another, and to what ends? How does the shifting political balance--as well as the shifting border--between the two kingdoms complicate notions of Scottishness and Englishness? What happens to important texts, genres, and even poetic forms when they cross this border? How do texts produced in the Anglo-Scottish borderlands transform mainstream notions of Scottish and English identities?"--"The Anglo-Scottish border in the late medieval and early modern period was a highly contested region, a militarized zone that was also a place of cultural contact and exchange. The contributors to this volume explore the role of this borderland in the construction of both Scottish and English identities, seeking insight into the role that Scotland and England played in one another's imaginations. Texts that originate in, pass through, or comment on the Anglo-Scottish borderland reveal the border as a crucial third term in the articulation of Scottish and English national consciousness and cultural identity"--
Main Description
The Anglo-Scottish border in the late medieval and early modern period was a highly contested region; both a militarized zone and a place of cultural contact and exchange. The contributors to this volume explore the role of this borderland in the construction of both Scottish and English identities, seeking insight into the role that Scotland and England played in one another's imaginations. Texts that originated in, pass through, or comment on the Anglo-Scottish border reveal it as a crucial third term in the articulation of Scottish and English national consciousness and cultural identity.
Main Description
The Anglo-Scottish border in the late medieval and early modern period was a highly contested region; both a militarized zone and a place of cultural contact and exchange. The contributors to this volume explore the role of this borderland in the construction of both Scottish and English identities, seeking insight into the role that Scotland and England played in one another's imaginations. Texts that originated in, pass through, or comment on the Anglo-Scottish border reveal it as a crucialthird term in the articulation of Scottish and English national consciousness and cultural identity.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Introduction: Writing Across the Bordersp. 1
The Borderlands of Satire: Linked, Opposed, and Exchanged Political Poetry During the Scottish and English Wars of the Early Fourteenth Centuryp. 15
Sovereign Exception: Pre-National Consolidation in The Taill of Rauf Coilyearp. 33
Friend or Foe? Negotiating the Anglo-Scottish Border in Sir Thomas Gray's Scalacronica and Richard Holland's Buke of the Howlatp. 51
Anglo-Scottish Relations in John Hardyng's Chroniclep. 69
The Border, England, and the English in Some Older Scots Lyric and Occasional Poemsp. 87
The Border Writes Backp. 103
Passing the Book: The Scottish Shaping of Chaucer's Dream States in Bodleian Library, MS Arch. Selden. B.24p. 121
Lydgate Manuscripts and Prints in Late Medieval Scotlandp. 141
A Distinction of Poetic Form: What Happened to Rhyme Royal in Scotland?p. 161
"Rois Red and Quhit, Resplendent of Colour": Margaret Tudor and Scotland's Floricultural Future in William Dunbar's Poetryp. 181
The Scottish Identity of Gavin Douglasp. 195
Afterword: Eisd O Eisdp. 211
Contributorsp. 225
Indexp. 229
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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