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The fire of freedom : Abraham Galloway and the slaves' Civil War /
David S. Cecelski.
imprint
Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2012.
description
326 p.
ISBN
0807835668 (hardback), 9780807835661 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2012.
isbn
0807835668 (hardback)
9780807835661 (hardback)
abstract
"Abraham H. Galloway (1837-70) was a fiery young slave rebel, radical abolitionist, and Union spy who rose out of bondage to become one of the most significant and stirring black leaders in the South during the Civil War. Throughout his brief, mercurial life, Galloway fought against slavery and injustice. He risked his life behind enemy lines, recruited black soldiers for the North, and fought racism in the Union army's ranks. He also stood at the forefront of an African American political movement that flourished in the Union-occupied parts of North Carolina, even leading a historic delegation of black southerners to the White House to meet with President Lincoln and to demand the full rights of citizenship. He later became one of the first black men elected to the North Carolina legislature. Long hidden from history, Galloway's story reveals a war unfamiliar to most of us. As David Cecelski writes, "Galloway's Civil War was a slave insurgency, a war of liberation that was the culmination of generations of perseverance and faith." This riveting portrait illuminates Galloway's life and deepens our insight into the Civil War and Reconstruction as experienced by African Americans in the South. "--
"Abraham H. Galloway (1837-70) was a fiery young slave rebel, radical abolitionist, and Union spy who rose out of bondage to become one of the most significant and stirring black leaders in the South during the Civil War. Throughout his brief, mercurial life, Galloway fought against slavery and injustice. This riveting portrait illuminates Galloway's life and deepens our insight into the Civil War and Reconstruction as experienced by African Americans in the South"--
catalogue key
8590238
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
Abraham H. Galloway (1837-70) was a fiery young slave rebel, radical abolitionist, and Union spy who rose out of bondage to become one of the most significant and stirring black leaders in the South during the Civil War. Throughout his brief, mercurial life, Galloway fought against slavery and injustice. This riveting portrait illuminates Galloway's life and deepens our insight into the Civil War and Reconstruction as experienced by African Americans in the South.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2013-03-01:
Abraham Galloway lived a short but exciting life. Born a slave in North Carolina in 1837, he escaped to freedom in 1857 and embarked on a journey that took him to Canada and Haiti, back into the South as a Union spy in the Civil War, and then into a career as a political activist. Galloway recruited blacks for the army, insisting that they receive equal pay and treatment, and was one of a group of African American leaders who met with President Lincoln at the White House. Although illiterate, Galloway was a powerful speaker, a moving force in the National Equal Rights League, and an active member of the North Carolina Constitutional Convention of 1868. At the time of his death in 1870, he was a member of the North Carolina State Senate. Historian Cecelski chronicles not only Galloway's life but also the efforts of countless African American men and women to achieve freedom and equal rights. Given his hopes for the future, perhaps it was a blessing that Galloway died before the Redeemers took the promise of equality away. All libraries should purchase this well-written work. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. D. Butts Gordon College (GA)
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A book that will be important to people who like to read about the Civil War and those interested in the struggle for Civil Rights." -D. G. Martin, The Mountaineer
"All libraries should purchase this well-written work. . . . Highly recommended. All levels/libraries." - Choice
"An excellent work of scholarship by a top flight historian. I am deeply impressed by the detective work that went into discovering Galloway's story."--Edward E. Baptist, Cornell University
"A riveting portrait of a real-life African-American icon." -Kat Williams
"Beautifully crafted, exhaustively researched and well-argued. . . . Cecelski provides a clear window into the emancipation process." -Raleigh News & Observer
"Cecelski has restored Galloway to his rightful place in the historiography. . . . [He] has done a remarkable job of tracing his subject's multifarious contribution to the cause of black freedom and equality." - American Historical Review
"Cecelski's marvelous story of a North Carolina slave who transcended his bondage with flair provides a meaningful way to commemorate the sesquicentennial Civil War anniversaries." - Publishers Weekly
"This portrait of an important American will appeal to those with an interest in African American political history during the Civil War and Reconstruction eras as well as those with an interest in North Carolina history." - Library Journal
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, March 2013
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Abraham H. Galloway (1837-70) was a fiery young slave rebel, radical abolitionist, and Union spy who rose out of bondage to become one of the most significant and stirring black leaders in the South during the Civil War. Throughout his brief, mercurial life, Galloway fought against slavery and injustice. He risked his life behind enemy lines, recruited black soldiers for the North, and fought racism in the Union army's ranks. He also stood at the forefront of an African American political movement that flourished in the Union-occupied parts of North Carolina, even leading a historic delegation of black southerners to the White House to meet with President Lincoln and to demand the full rights of citizenship. He later became one of the first black men elected to the North Carolina legislature. Long hidden from history, Galloway's story reveals a war unfamiliar to most of us. As David Cecelski writes, "Galloway's Civil War was a slave insurgency, a war of liberation that was the culmination of generations of perseverance and faith." This riveting portrait illuminates Galloway's life and deepens our insight into the Civil War and Reconstruction as experienced by African Americans in the South.
Table of Contents
Forewordp. xi
Prologue: New Bern, North Carolina, May 1863p. xiii
At River's Edgep. 1
The Secret Feelings of Their Heartsp. 13
A Second John Brownp. 27
Spies All Their Livesp. 43
They Will Fight to the Deathp. 58
My Harte Over Run with Joyp. 83
The Death of a Herop. 99
The Meeting with Lincolnp. 115
Their Path to Freedomp. 128
God's Free Manp. 138
Soldiers of the Crossp. 158
In This Land We Will Remainp. 169
Loud Calls for Gallowayp. 189
Epiloguep. 213
Notesp. 219
Bibliographyp. 283
Acknowledgmentsp. 307
Indexp. 309
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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