Catalogue


Forty-Seventh Star : New Mexico's Struggle for Statehood /
David V. Holtby.
imprint
Norman : University of Oklahoma Press, c2012.
description
xix, 362 p. : ill., maps 24 cm
ISBN
0806142820 (hardcover : alk. paper), 9780806142821 (hardcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Norman : University of Oklahoma Press, c2012.
isbn
0806142820 (hardcover : alk. paper)
9780806142821 (hardcover : alk. paper)
contents note
Introduction: "The Miracle-Breeding Imagination" -- "Only a Licensed and Paid Beggar" -- "A Strong Case against the Admission" -- "Politically Realistic Alternatives" -- "Full Knowledge of Its Fraudulent Character" -- "People Who are to the Manor Born" -- "Steady, Persistent, Unrelaxing Determination" -- "Conservative and Law Loving" -- Injurious to the Cause of Free Government" -- Conclusion: "That Bright Star Added to the Flag" -- Notes.
catalogue key
8590207
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 327-351) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2013-03-01:
New Mexico's quest for statehood lasted 64 years, and much scholarship attributes this to white racism. Holtby's splendid account does not discount such nefarious ethno-cultural forces but shows how national and territorial politics drew out the struggle for statehood and complicates any narrative focusing exclusively on race. Statehood supporters, such as Thomas Catron, suffered from both bad luck and poor political judgment in failing to line up Republican congressional leadership behind statehood. Catron's simultaneous failure as attorney of record in land grant court cases that continued the rescission of common lands--which eventually wound up in federal hands--reveals another theme: the quest for statehood radically changed the economy of New Mexico. Congressional statehood opponents, especially Senator Albert Beveridge, were motivated more by fears that New Mexico might send Democrats to Congress than by fears of Spanish-speaking New Mexicans. But opponents could stoke fears of lawlessness and the unfitness of the local population as a pretext to prolonging New Mexico's territorial phase. Although President Theodore Roosevelt rhetorically supported statehood, it was President William Howard Taft who cajoled Republican senators into passing the enabling act, in part by linking statehood to the passage of the Mann-Elkins Act. Summing Up: Recommended. All levels/libraries. E. R. Crowther Adams State College
Reviews
Review Quotes
"This thoroughly engaging narrative exposes the heroes and scoundrels who played important roles in New Mexico's hard-fought battles on the road to statehood. Although pitted against a Goliath of national political and economic interests, New Mexico survived. This is a drama that should be read by all New Mexicans. Forty-Seventh Star is sure to become the definitive history."- Rudolfo Anaya
"This thoroughly engaging narrative exposes the heroes and scoundrels who played important roles in New Mexico's hard-fought battles on the road to statehood. Although pitted against a Goliath of national political and economic interests, New Mexico survived. This is a drama that should be read by all New Mexicans. Forty-Seventh Star is sure to become the definitive history."-- Rudolfo Anaya
" Forty-Seventh Star is the most complete, original, readable, and lively account of the sixty-year struggle between pro-statehood leaders and equally powerful anti-statehood forces, both in New Mexico and in Washington, D.C., that I have ever read. Equally significant is Holtby's nonpartisan treatment, without prejudice, of Nuevomexicanos, Euro-Americans, and Indian Americans and their views. In short, this is the most important book about the New Mexican struggle for statehood to appear in a generation."- Howard R. Lamar, Professor Emeritus of History, Yale University
" Forty-Seventh Star is the most complete, original, readable, and lively account of the sixty-year struggle between pro-statehood leaders and equally powerful anti-statehood forces, both in New Mexico and in Washington, D.C., that I have ever read. Equally significant is Holtby's nonpartisan treatment, without prejudice, of Nuevomexicanos, Euro-Americans, and Indian Americans and their views. In short, this is the most important book about the New Mexican struggle for statehood to appear in a generation."-- Howard R. Lamar, Professor Emeritus of History, Yale University
"In less able hands, the story of New Mexico's final push to win statehood might well have become a stodgy recital of the political maneuverings of self-serving men with inflated egos. Instead, David V. Holtby offers a thoroughly engaging examination of key figures and major events leading to New Mexico's statehood year of 1912. This beautifully written and meticulously researched narrative provides new insights on politics in the late-nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century Southwest."- Marc Simmons
"In less able hands, the story of New Mexico's final push to win statehood might well have become a stodgy recital of the political maneuverings of self-serving men with inflated egos. Instead, David V. Holtby offers a thoroughly engaging examination of key figures and major events leading to New Mexico's statehood year of 1912. This beautifully written and meticulously researched narrative provides new insights on politics in the late-nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century Southwest."-- Marc Simmons
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, March 2013
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Summaries
Main Description
New Mexico was ceded to the United States in 1848, at the end of the war with Mexico, but not until 1912 did President William Howard Taft sign the proclamation that promoted New Mexico from territory to state. Why did New Mexico's push for statehood last sixty-four years? Conventional wisdom has it that racism was solely to blame. But this fresh look at the history finds a more complex set of obstacles, tied primarily to self-serving politicians. Forty-Seventh Star, published in New Mexico's centennial year, is the first book on its quest for statehood in more than forty years. David V. Holtby closely examines the final stretch of New Mexico's tortuous road to statehood, beginning in the 1890s. His deeply researched narrative juxtaposes events in Washington, D.C., and in the territory to present the repeated collisions between New Mexicans seeking to control their destiny and politicians opposing them, including Republican U.S. senators Albert J. Beveridge of Indiana and Nelson W. Aldrich of Rhode Island. Holtby places the quest for statehood in national perspective while examining the territory's political, economic, and social development. He shows how a few powerful men brewed a concoction of racism, cronyism, corruption, and partisan politics that poisoned New Mexicans' efforts to join the Union. Drawing on extensive Spanish-language and archival sources, the author also explores the consequences that the drive to become a state had for New Mexico's Euro-American, Nuevomexicano, American Indian, African American, and Asian communities. Holtby offers a compelling story that shows why and how home rule mattered-then and now-for New Mexicans and for all Americans.
Main Description
New Mexico was ceded to the United States in 1848, at the end of the war with Mexico, but not until 1912 did President William Howard Taft sign the proclamation that promoted New Mexico from territory to state. Why did New Mexico's push for statehood last sixty-four years? Conventional wisdom has it that racism was solely to blame. But this fresh look at the history finds a more complex set of obstacles, tied primarily to self-serving politicians. Forty-Seventh Star, published in New Mexico's centennial year, is the first book on its quest for statehood in more than forty years. David V. Holtby closely examines the final stretch of New Mexico's tortuous road to statehood, beginning in the 1890s. His deeply researched narrative juxtaposes events in Washington, D.C., and in the territory to present the repeated collisions between New Mexicans seeking to control their destiny and politicians opposing them, including Republican U.S. senators Albert J. Beveridge of Indiana and Nelson W. Aldrich of Rhode Island. Holtby places the quest for statehood in national perspective while examining the territory's political, economic, and social development. He shows how a few powerful men brewed a concoction of racism, cronyism, corruption, and partisan politics that poisoned New Mexicans' efforts to join the Union. Drawing on extensive Spanish-language and archival sources, the author also explores the consequences that the drive to become a state had for New Mexico's Euro-American, Nuevomexicano, American Indian, African American, and Asian communities. Holtby offers a compelling story that shows why and how home rule mattered--then and now--for New Mexicans and for all Americans.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. ix
Prefacep. xi
Acknowledgmentsp. xvii
Introduction: "The Miracle-Breeding Imagination"p. 3
"Only a Licensed and Paid Beggar"p. 11
"A Strong Case against the Admission"p. 39
"Politically Realistic Alternatives"p. 67
"Full Knowledge of Its Fraudulent Character"p. 105
"People Who Are to the Manor Born"p. 131
"Steady, Persistent, Unrelaxing Determination"p. 159
"Conservative and Law Loving"p. 205
"Injurious to the Cause of Free Government"p. 231
Conclusion: "That Bright Star Added to the Flag"p. 259
Notesp. 285
Bibliographyp. 327
Indexp. 353
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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