Catalogue

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Warfare and shamanism in Amazonia /
Carlos Fausto ; translated by David Rodgers.
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, c2012.
description
xv, 347 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
9781107020061 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, c2012.
isbn
9781107020061 (hardback)
contents note
Machine generated contents note: 1. The matter of time; 2. Images of abundance and scarcity; 3. Forms through history; 4. Why war?; 5. The master and the pet; 6. Death producing life; 7. Gods, axes, and jaguars.
abstract
"Warfare and Shamanism in Amazonia is an ethnographic study of the Parakanã, a little-known indigenous people of Amazonia, who inhabit the interfluvial region in the state of Pará, Brazil. This book analyzes the relationship between warfare and shamanism in Parakanã society from the late nineteenth century until the end of the twentieth century. Based on the author's extensive fieldwork, the book presents first-hand ethnographic data collected among a generation still deeply involved in conflicts. The result is an innovative work with a broad thematic and comparative scope"--
catalogue key
8588720
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
Advance praise: 'Here is the highest form of anthropology: superb ethnography, seriously pondered. Thinking through a small Amazonian group, Carlos Fausto is able to synthesize oppositions of universal import - the likes of history vs. structure or autonomy vs. alterity - that have long troubled the human sciences. Then there is the sheer intellectual pleasure of following a narrative that turns cannibalism into kinship.' Marshall Sahlins, University of Chicago
Advance praise: 'Paying equally close attention to historical events and cultural forms, Warfare and Shamanism in Amazonia presents an ethnographically rich and theoretically nuanced picture of Parakana agency. In so doing, it offers a compelling model for describing the processes of change and continuity in lowland societies as well as beyond. Of special interest to a wide variety of readers are Fausto's analyses of complicated shifts in agriculture and sociopolitical organization that avoid the explanatory logics of either cultural regression or evolution as well as his already influential discussion of the relationship between predation and the production of familiarity and kinship in indigenous lowland societies.' Suzanne Oakdale, author of I Foresee My Life: The Ritual Performance of Autobiography in an Amazonian Community
'Carlos Fausto has become over the years one of the leading figures in the anthropology of Amazonian Indians, and thus, in view of the relevance of this cultural area in present anthropological debates, a forefront actor in the inquiry on what it is to be human. Warfare and Shamanism in Amazonia offers yet another example of his exceptional intellectual creativity.' Philippe Descola, Collège de France
'Carlos Fausto has become over the years one of the leading figures in the anthropology of Amazonian Indians, and thus, in view of the relevance of this cultural area in present anthropological debates, a forefront actor in the inquiry on what it is to be human. Warfare and Shamanism in Amazonia offers yet another example of his exceptional intellectual creativity.' Philippe Descola, Collge de France
'Here is the highest form of anthropology: superb ethnography, seriously pondered. Thinking through a small Amazonian group, Carlos Fausto is able to synthesize oppositions of universal import - the likes of history vs. structure or autonomy vs. alterity - that have long troubled the human sciences. Then there is the sheer intellectual pleasure of following a narrative that turns cannibalism into kinship.' Marshall Sahlins, University of Chicago
'Paying equally close attention to historical events and cultural forms, Warfare and Shamanism in Amazonia presents an ethnographically rich and theoretically nuanced picture of Parakana agency. In so doing, it offers a compelling model for describing the processes of change and continuity in lowland societies as well as beyond. Of special interest to a wide variety of readers are Fausto's analyses of complicated shifts in agriculture and sociopolitical organization that avoid the explanatory logics of either cultural regression or evolution as well as his already influential discussion of the relationship between predation and the production of familiarity and kinship in indigenous lowland societies.' Suzanne Oakdale, author of I Foresee My Life: The Ritual Performance of Autobiography in an Amazonian Community
'This fine example of Brazilian structuralism applied to the Amazon region offers a unique discussion of Parakana history and culture. Warfare and Shamanism in Amazonia represents a valuable addition to the anthropological literature, for both specialist and non-specialist readers. Specialist readers will find rich ethnographic data and a wealth of pointed analyses, while a general anthropological audience will be able to appreciate how much Amazonianist ethnology is contributing to contemporary anthropological theory today.' Dr Laura Rival, Oxford University
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This volume describes the culture of the Parakana, little-known indigenous people of Amazonia, focusing on conflict and ritual.
Description for Bookstore
This book is an ethnographic study of the Parakanã, a little-known indigenous people of Amazonia, who inhabit the Xingu–Tocantins interfluve in the state of Pará, Brazil. Carlos Fausto analyzes the relationship between warfare and shamanism in Parakanã society from the late nineteenth century until the end of the twentieth century.
Description for Bookstore
This book is an ethnographic study of the Parakan, a little-known indigenous people of Amazonia, who inhabit the Xingu–Tocantins interfluve in the state of Par, Brazil. Carlos Fausto analyzes the relationship between warfare and shamanism in Parakan society from the late nineteenth century until the end of the twentieth century.
Description for Bookstore
Warfare and Shamanism in Amazonia is an ethnographic study of the Parakana, a little-known indigenous people of Amazonia, who inhabit the Xingu-Tocantins interfluve in the state of Pará, Brazil. Carlos Fausto analyzes the relationship between warfare and shamanism in Parakana society from the late 19th century until the end of the 20th century.
Main Description
Warfare and Shamanism in Amazonia is an ethnographic study of the Parakana, a little-known indigenous people of Amazonia, who inhabit the interfluvial region in the state of Pará, Brazil. This book analyzes the relationship between warfare and shamanism in Parakana society from the late 19th century until the end of the 20th century. Based on the author's extensive fieldwork, the book presents first-hand ethnographic data collected among a generation still deeply involved in conflicts. The result is an innovative work with a broad thematic and comparative scope.
Main Description
Warfare and Shamanism in Amazonia is an ethnographic study of the Parakan, a little-known indigenous people of Amazonia, who inhabit the interfluvial region in the state of Par, Brazil. This book analyzes the relationship between warfare and shamanism in Parakan society from the late nineteenth century until the end of the twentieth century. Based on the author's extensive fieldwork, the book presents first-hand ethnographic data collected among a generation still deeply involved in conflicts. The result is an innovative work with a broad thematic and comparative scope.
Main Description
Warfare and Shamanism in Amazonia is an ethnographic study of the Parakanã, a little-known indigenous people of Amazonia, who inhabit the interfluvial region in the state of Pará, Brazil. This book analyzes the relationship between warfare and shamanism in Parakanã society from the late nineteenth century until the end of the twentieth century. Based on the author's extensive fieldwork, the book presents first-hand ethnographic data collected among a generation still deeply involved in conflicts. The result is an innovative work with a broad thematic and comparative scope.
Table of Contents
The matter of time
Images of abundance and scarcity
Forms through history
Why war?
The master and the pet
Death producing life
Gods, axes, and jaguars
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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