Catalogue


Masculinities, militarisation and the end conscription campaign : war resistance in apartheid South Africa /
Daniel Conway.
imprint
Manchester ; New York : Manchester University Press, 2012.
description
x, 176 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0719083206 (hbk.), 9780719083204 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Manchester ; New York : Manchester University Press, 2012.
isbn
0719083206 (hbk.)
9780719083204 (hbk.)
abstract
This title explores the gendered dynamics of apartheid-era South Africa's militarisation and the analyses the defiance of compulsory military service by individual white men, and the anti-apartheid activism of the white men and women in the ECC, the most significant white anti-apartheid movement to happen in South Africa.
catalogue key
8573544
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [154]-171) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Daniel Conway is Lecturer in Politics at Loughborough University
Summaries
Main Description
Masculinities, Militarisation and the End Conscription Campaign explores the gendered dynamics of apartheid-era South Africa's militarization and analyses the defiance of compulsory military service by individual white men, and the anti-apartheid activism of the white men and women in the End Conscription Campaign (ECC), the most significant white anti-apartheid movement to happen in South Africa. Military conscription and objection to it are conceptualized as gendered acts of citizenship and premised on and constitutive of masculinities. Conway draws upon a range of materials and disciplines to produce this socio-political study. Sources include interviews with white men who objected to military service in the South African Defence Force (SADF); archival material, including military intelligence surveillance of the ECC; ECC campaigning material, press reports and other pro-state propaganda. The analysis is informed by perspectives in sociology, international relations, history and from work on contemporary militarized societies such as those in Israel and Turkey. This book also explores the interconnections between militarization, sexuality, race, homophobia, and political authoritarianism.
Main Description
Masculinities, militarisation and the End Conscription Campaign explores the gendered dynamics of apartheid-era South Africa's militarisation and analyses the defiance of compulsory military service by individual white men, and the anti-apartheid activism of the white men and women in the End Conscription Campaign (ECC), the most significant white anti-apartheid movement to happen in South Africa. Military conscription and objection to it are conceptualised as gendered acts of citizenship and premised on and constitutive of masculinities. Conway draws upon a range of materials and disciplines to produce this socio-political study. Sources include interviews with white men who objected to military service in the South African Defence Force (SADF); archival material, including military intelligence surveillance of the ECC; ECC campaigning material, press reports and other pro-state propaganda. The analysis is informed by perspectives in sociology, international relations, history and from work on contemporary militarised societies such as those in Israel and Turkey. This book also explores the interconnections between militarisation, sexuality, race, homophobia and political authoritarianism.
Main Description
Masculinities, militarisation and the End Conscription Campaign explores the gendered dynamics of apartheid-era South Africa's militarisation and analyses the defiance of compulsory military service by individual white men, and the anti-apartheid activism of the white men and women in the End Conscription Campaign (ECC), the most significant white anti-apartheid movement to happen in South Africa. Military conscription and objection to it are conceptualised as gendered acts of citizenship and premised on and constitutive of masculinities. Conway draws upon a range of materials and disciplines to produce this socio-political study. Sources include interviews with white men who objected to military service in the South African Defence Force (SADF); archival material, including military intelligence surveillance of the ECC; ECC campaigning material, press reports and other pro-state propaganda. The analysis is informed by perspectives in sociol
Main Description
Masculinities, militarisation and the End Conscription Campaign explores the gendered dynamics of apartheid-era South Africa#146;s militarisation and analyses the defiance of compulsory military service by individual white men, and the anti-apartheid activism of the white men and women in the End Conscription Campaign (ECC), the most significant white anti-apartheid movement to happen in South Africa. Military conscription and objection to it are conceptualised as gendered acts of citizenship and premised on and constitutive of masculinities. Conway draws upon a range of materials and disciplines to produce this socio-political study. Sources include interviews with white men who objected to military service in the South African Defence Force (SADF); archival material, including military intelligence surveillance of the ECC; ECC campaigning material, press reports and other pro-state propaganda. The analysis is informed by perspectives in sociology, international relations, history and from work on contemporary militarised societies such as those in Israel and Turkey. This book also explores the interconnections between militarisation, sexuality, race, homophobia and political authoritarianism.
Long Description
Masculinities, militarisation and the End Conscription Campaign explores the gendered dynamics of apartheid-era South Africa's militarisation and analyses the defiance of compulsory military service by individual white men and the anti-apartheid activism of the white men and women in the End Conscription Campaign (ECC), which was the most significant white anti-apartheid movement in South Africa. Military conscription and objection to it are conceptualised as gendered acts of citizenship and premised on and constitutive of masculinities. Conway draws upon a range of materials and disciplines to produce this socio-political study. Sources include interviews with white men who objected to military service in the South African Defence Force (SADF), archival material including military intelligence surveillance of the ECC, ECC campaigning material, press reports and other pro-state propaganda. The analysis is informed by perspectives in sociology, international relations, history and from work on contemporary militarised societies such as those in Israel and Turkey. Masculinities, Militarisation and the End Conscription Campaign also explores the interconnections between militarisation, sexuality, race, homophobia and political authoritarianism.This book is essential reading for scholars and students interested in South African liberation history, militarisation and gender, conscientious objection and peace activism. It will appeal across disciplines of International Relations, Sociology, History and Politics.
Long Description
Masculinities, militarisation and the End Conscription Campaign explores the gendered dynamics of apartheid-era South Africa's militarisation, analysing the defiance of compulsory military service by individual white men and the anti-apartheid activism of the white men and women in the End Conscription Campaign (ECC). The ECC was the most significant white anti-apartheid social movement in South Africa. Military conscription and objection to it are conceptualised as gendered acts of citizenship and premised on and constitutive of masculinities. Analysing the interconnections between militarisation, sexuality, race, homophobia and political authoritarianism, Conway draws upon a range of materials and disciplines to produce this socio-political study. Sources include interviews with white men who objected to military service in the South African Defence Force (SADF), archival material including military intelligence surveillance of the ECC, ECC campaigning material, press reports and pro-state propaganda. The analysis is informed by perspectives in sociology, international relations, history and from analysis of contemporary militarised societies such as Israel and Turkey. This book is essential reading for scholars and students interested in South African liberation history, militarisation, gender, conscientious objection and peace activism. It will appeal across disciplines of International Relations, Sociology, Politics and History
Description for Reader
Masculinities, militarisation and the End Conscription Campaign explores the gendered dynamics of apartheid-era South Africa#146;s militarisation, analysing the defiance of compulsory military service by individual white men and the anti-apartheid activism of the white men and women in the End Conscription Campaign (ECC). The ECC was the most significant white anti-apartheid social movement in South Africa. Military conscription and objection to it are conceptualised as gendered acts of citizenship and premised on and constitutive of masculinities. Analysing the interconnections between militarisation, sexuality, race, homophobia and political authoritarianism, Conway draws upon a range of materials and disciplines to produce this socio-political study. Sources include interviews with white men who objected to military service in the South African Defence Force (SADF), archival material including military intelligence surveillance of the ECC, ECC campaigning material, press reports and pro-state propaganda. The analysis is informed by perspectives in sociology, international relations, history and from analysis of contemporary militarised societies such as Israel and Turkey. This book is essential reading for scholars and students interested in South African liberation history, militarisation, gender, conscientious objection and peace activism. It will appeal across disciplines of International Relations, Sociology, Politics and History
Bowker Data Service Summary
This title explores the gendered dynamics of apartheid-era South Africa's militarisation and the analyses the defiance of compulsory military service by individual white men, and the anti-apartheid activism of the white men and women in the ECC, the most significant white anti-apartheid movement to happen in South Africa.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. vii
Acknowledgementsp. ix
Abbreviationsp. xi
Introductionp. 1
Soldiers, citizens and strangersp. 17
The militarisation of South Africa and the growth of war resistancep. 33
Performing citizenship, engendering consent: constructing militarised masculinities and citizenship in South Africap. 56
'Going the right way': contesting conscriptionp. 86
Breaking away: the End Conscription Campaignp. 106
'Every coward's choice'?: responses to war resistancep. 128
Conclusionp. 148
Bibliographyp. 154
Indexp. 172
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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