Catalogue


Public jobs and political agendas : the public sector in an era of economic stress /
edited by Daniel J.B. Mitchell.
imprint
Champaign, IL : Labor and Employment Relations Association, c2012.
description
259 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
ISBN
0913447056 (pbk.), 9780913447055 (pbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Champaign, IL : Labor and Employment Relations Association, c2012.
isbn
0913447056 (pbk.)
9780913447055 (pbk.)
contents note
Effects of deep recession on public sector pay, benefits, and employment / David Lewin -- Local government restructuring in a time of fiscal stress / Mildred E. Warner -- Public sector employment in OECD countries post-economic crisis / Sabina Dewan -- Cash-strapped governments : privatization as a response to the crisis of the Great Recession / Ellen Dannin -- The Great Recession's impact on African American public sector employment / William M. Rodgers III -- Trends in the relative compensation of state and local employees / Keith A. Bender and John S. Heywood -- The fiscal crisis, public pension and labor and employment relations / Ilana Boivie and Christian E. Weller -- California's public sector adapts to the Great Recession / Daniel J.B. Mitchell -- Public service cost containment in Trinidad and Tobago : assessing the impact of contract employment / Charlene M.L. Roach and Gloria Davis-Cooper.
catalogue key
8572425
 
Includes bibliographical references.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2013-06-01:
This volume contains nine essays, plus an editor's introduction, dealing with public employment issues mostly in the US. (One deals with OECD countries, and the concluding essay addresses Trinidad/Tobago.) All essays are at least very good. David Lewin's essay on the great recession's effects on employment and compensation is excellent, providing a wealth of information and generally solid interpretations of the data. William Rodgers provides insights into the disproportionate decline in African American employment during the recession. Essays six and seven, dealing in depth with compensation, are also excellent. Editor Mitchell, in the introduction, presents some valuable preliminary data and writes, "Lewin [in essay 1] ... notes the large size of government employment ... roughly one-sixth of the U.S. workforce." While this is accurate, government's share of employment peaked around 1975 and has been steadily declining since. Federal government employment has been declining as a share of the total since about 1950, while state and local government employment (combined) has been roughly stable as a share of total employment after peaking in 1975. Despite such occasional missteps, this volume as a whole makes a valuable and timely contribution. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All readership levels. D. A. Coffin emeritus, Indiana University Northwest
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A valuable and timely contribution. Summing Up: Highly recommended."-Choice (June 2013)
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, June 2013
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
'Public Jobs and Political Agendas' spotlights the important public/private differences that account for the special attention visited upon the public sector starting with the Great Recession. The first of these differences was the timing of the response to the recession and its aftermath on revenues. The second difference involves employee compensation and the contrasts between public and private practices in that area. Intertwined with these two factors is the role of politics: social welfare programs have been targeted in recent years, with repercussions for even the most efficient state and local government agencies and their employees.
Main Description
In many ways the public sector and the private sector share concerns about how best to manage their employment functions: recruitment, evaluation, incentives, discipline, retention, compensation. There are also substantial differences between the two sectors. Not surprisingly, a period such as the Great Recession and its aftermath highlights those differences. Some state and local governments that had engaged in precarious fiscal practices were thrust into public attention as their tax revenues receded. But that is not the whole story. The reasons public sector workers and human resource practices are under scrutiny go beyond the impact of a recession putting the spotlight on already-strained budgets.Public Jobs and Political Agendas spotlights the important public/private differences that account for the special attention visited upon the public sector starting with the Great Recession. The first of these differences was the timing of the response to the recession and its aftermath on revenues. The second difference involves employee compensation and the contrasts between public and private practices in that area. Intertwined with these two factors is the role of politics: social welfare programs have been targeted in recent years, with repercussions for even the most efficient state and local government agencies and their employees.Contributors: Keith A. Bender, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee; Ilana Boivie, National Institute on Retirement Security; Ellen Dannin, Pennsylvania State University; Gloria Davis-Cooper, University of West Indies; Sabina Dewan, Center for American Progress; John S. Heywood, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee; David Lewin, UCLA Anderson School of Management; Daniel J.B. Mitchell, UCLA Anderson School of Management and the UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs; Charlene M. L. Roach, The University of The West Indies; William M. Rodgers III, Rutgers University; Mildred E. Warner, Cornell University; Christian Weller, University of Massachusetts Boston and Center for American Progress
Main Description
In many ways the public sector and the private sector share concerns about how best to manage their employment functions: recruitment, evaluation, incentives, discipline, retention, compensation. There are also substantial differences between the two sectors. Not surprisingly, a period such as the Great Recession and its aftermath highlights those differences. Some state and local governments that had engaged in precarious fiscal practices were thrust into public attention as their tax revenues receded. But that is not the whole story. The reasons public sector workers and human resource practices are under scrutiny go beyond the impact of a recession putting the spotlight on already-strained budgets. Public Jobs and Political Agendas spotlights the important public/private differences that account for the special attention visited upon the public sector starting with the Great Recession. The first of these differences was the timing of the response to the recession and its aftermath on revenues. The second difference involves employee compensation and the contrasts between public and private practices in that area. Intertwined with these two factors is the role of politics: social welfare programs have been targeted in recent years, with repercussions for even the most efficient state and local government agencies and their employees. Contributors: Keith A. Bender, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee; Ilana Boivie, National Institute on Retirement Security; Ellen Dannin, Pennsylvania State University; Gloria Davis-Cooper, University of West Indies; Sabina Dewan, Center for American Progress; John S. Heywood, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee; David Lewin, UCLA Anderson School of Management; Daniel J.B. Mitchell, UCLA Anderson School of Management and the UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs; Charlene M. L. Roach, The University of The West Indies; William M. Rodgers III, Rutgers University; Mildred E. Warner, Cornell University; Christian Weller, University of Massachusetts Boston and Center for American Progress
Table of Contents
Introductionp. 1
Effects of Deep Recession on Public Sector Pay, Benefits, and Employmentp. 13
Local Government Restructuring in a Time of Fiscal Stressp. 41
Public Sector Employment in OECD Countries Post-Economic Crisisp. 59
Cash-Strapped Governments: Privatization as a Response to the Crisis of the Great Recessionp. 79
The Great Recessions Impact on African American Public Sector Employmentp. 105
Trends in the Relative Compensation of State and Local Employeesp. 133
The Fiscal Crisis, Public Pension and Labor and Employment Relationsp. 167
California's Public Sector Adapts to the Great Recessionp. 195
Public Service Cost Containment in Trinidad and Tobago: Assessing the Impact of Contract Employmentp. 237
About the Contributorsp. 257
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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