Catalogue


The 7 hidden reasons employees leave : how to recognize the subtle signs and act before it's too late /
Leigh Branham.
edition
2nd ed.
imprint
New York : American Management Association, c2012.
description
xii, 242 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0814417582 (hbk.), 9780814417584 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : American Management Association, c2012.
isbn
0814417582 (hbk.)
9780814417584 (hbk.)
catalogue key
8571642
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
A unique opportunity at another company. A step up in position. More money. We've all heard the familiar explanations offered by employees as they head off to newerand presumably bettercareer opportunities. But is employee turnover just "the unavoidable cost of doing business?" Or is there something proactive you and your organization can do to keep your best people around for years to come? Based on enlightening research, the original edition of The 7 Hidden Reasons Employees Leave revealed that despite what we believe, people are four times more likely to leave a job because of something going on in the workplace than for an outside opportunity. But after the seismic changes that have shaken the economy and the job market these past few years, are the reasons employees leave still the same? Incorporating the results of more than 1,000 new post-exit surveys asking new questions such as "Was there a triggering event?," "What could your employer have done to make you want to change your mind and stay?," and "Did you look for another job while still employed?", the Second Edition adds new depth and relevance to the original research. Has money become more of a key issue for people deciding to leave, now that the job market is slowly picking back up? How have workers' evolving thoughts on company culture and integrityand a growing lack of trust in senior leadershipaffected their reasons for staying or leaving? Packed with all new strategies and wisdom, the second edition shows you how to identify the warning signs of unmet expectations, and best act on them. You'll find out how to: Use smart talent strategies to avoid employee-job mismatches. Incorporate a five-step coaching and feedback process that builds strong and durable working relationships. Build an environment of mutual trust and confidence. Create growth and advancement opportunities that keep pace with career expectations of all four generations. Understand the emotional impact of compensation and recognition done well. Leverage exit and turnover data to increase employee retention. According to more than 80 percent of employees, it's not just seeing greener grass on the other side of the fence that makes them leave; it's the underlying negative factors that exist in their current workplaces. Filled with surprising revelations, this brand new edition of The 7 Hidden Reasons Employees Leave provides up-to-the-minute strategies for holding on to your employees in any market. LEIGH BRANHAM is founder/principal of the consulting firm Keeping the People, Inc. (www.keepingthepeople.com), and the author of Keeping the People Who Keep You in Business. He is also the co-author, with Mark Hirschfeld, of Re-Engage: How America's Best Places to Work Inspire Extra Effort in Extraordinary Times. He lives in Overland Park, Kansas.
First Chapter
<html><head></head><body><p style="margin-top: 0"> Why Care About Why They Leave? </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> CHAPTER ONE </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> The greatest obstacle to discovery is not ignorance— </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> it is the illusion of knowledge. </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> —DANIEL BOORSTIN </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> It was almost six weeks since Anna had resigned her position with her former </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> employer, but it was obvious that strong feelings were still stirring inside her. </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> “I was thrown into the job with no training. I asked for some one-on-one </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> time with my manager to go over the project inside out, but he never had the </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> time. I sensed he didn’t really know enough to be able to thoroughly brief me, </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> anyway. </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> “When I got feedback that certain work wasn’t acceptable, he wouldn’t be </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> specific about how to correct it in the future. . . . He actually enjoyed intimidating </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> people, and he had a terrible temper—he would ask me a question and, </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> if I didn’t know the answer, he would make fun of me in front of my coworkers. </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> As it turns out, he wasn’t following the right work procedures himself. </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> “Later, when I was working way below my skill set, I was told they </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> weren’t ready to give me a promotion, even though I had mastered everything. </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> “Finally, when I resigned, they didn’t seem interested in why I was leaving. </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> There was no exit interview.They never listened to me when I was there, </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> and they certainly didn’t care to listen when I left.” </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> Anna went on to say that she loved her management position with her </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> new employer:“I’m still doing what I love to do, but in a much more professional </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> environment. There’s open communication and no game playing. I </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> know where I stand with them at all times.” </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> One more thing—Anna went on to mention that she had hired away a </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> talented colleague from her former company. </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> In the post-exit interviews I do for client companies with employees they </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> regretted losing, these are the kinds of stories I hear. I know there are two sides </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> to every story and that Anna’s former manager might tell it differently. But I </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> also know that there is truth in Anna’s story, and in all the stories I hear—more </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> truth than many were willing to tell their former employers when they </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> checked out on their last day of employment. </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> The good news is that some companies do wake up and realize it’s not </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> too late to start listening to both former and current employees. Some grow </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> alarmed at the sudden departure of highly valued workers who leave over the </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> course of a few weeks.Others become concerned about protecting their reputation </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> as a desirable place to work, and most simply want to make sure they </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> have the talent they need to achieve their business objectives. </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> Why Many Managers Don’t Care </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> The fact is that many managers and even senior executives simply don’t care </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> about why their employees are leaving.Their attitude seems to be “If you don’t </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> like it, don’t let the door hit you in the backside on your way out!” If this </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> sounds familiar, it should, because it describes the prevailing mindset of most </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> managers in American companies today. Most are overworked, and many are </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> frustrated by their inability to meet the demands of the current workforce, </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> much less do exit interviews.And, increasingly, human resource departments </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> are so understaffed that they have little time to do more than ask departing </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> employees to complete perfunctory exit surveys on their last day.You care </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> about preventing turnover, or you wouldn’t be reading this book. So why do </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> you care? Why even take the time and effort to uncover the real reasons </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> employees leave? It would be much easier just to accept what most employees </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> say in exit interviews.You know the usual answers—“more money,” “better </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> opportunity.” </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> There are many ways to rationalize the loss of talent: </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> </p> <p class="MsoNormal"> ● Who has time to stop and wonder why they left, anyway? They’re </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> gone. </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> </p> <p class="MsoNormal"> ● They didn’t want to be here, so why worry about what they think? </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> </p> <p class="MsoNormal"> ● They were probably just disgruntled or had the wrong attitude or </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> just didn’t fit. </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> </p> <p class="MsoNormal"> ● We can’t expect to retain everybody we hire. </p> <p class="MsoNormal"> </p> <p class="MsoNormal"> ● There’s nobody that isn’t replaceable. </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> </p> <p class="MsoNormal"> ● Let’s just get on with finding a replacement. </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> Of course, we cannot hope to keep all our valued talent. But good managers </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> care enough to try to understand why good people leave, especially </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> when the departure could have been prevented.There will always be managers </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> who are too preoccupied, self-focused, or insensitive to notice the signs that </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> employees are becoming disengaged and too uncaring, complacent, blaming, </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> in denial, insecure, or ego-defensive to find out the real reasons they left.They </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> too readily accept turnover as “a cost of doing business.” They are too willing </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> to believe the superficial reasons for leaving that employees give in exit interviews. </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> Why? Psychologists call it “motivated blindness”; they cannot handle </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> the truth—that the real reason the employee left may be linked to their own </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> behavior.These managers are actually choosing not to see, hear, or speak the </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> “evil” that plagues them. </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> As Brad, another employee, told me during an exit interview, “It seems </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> like most managers just don’t care enough to go to any effort to retain good </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> people.”But many managers do care enough to coach, train, develop, and keep </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> their direct reports engaged. Now what we need are more organizations that </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> make heroes of these managers, not just by praising them but also by measuring </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> their contributions and rewarding them with serious money. </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> Managers Cannot Hear What Workers Will Not Speak </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> As we know, when exiting employees come to the question “Why are you </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> leaving?,”most are not inclined to tell the whole truth.Rather than risk burning </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> a bridge with the former manager, whose reference they might need, </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> they’ll just say or write “better opportunity” or “higher pay.”Why would they </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> want to go into the unpleasant truth about how they never got any feedback </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> or recognition from the boss or were passed over for promotion? </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> So, it is no wonder that in one survey, 89 percent of managers said they </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> believe that employees leave and stay mostly for the money. Yet, my own </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> research, the Saratoga Institute’s surveys of almost twenty thousand workers </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> from eighteen industries, and the research reported in dozens of other studies </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> reveal that about 80 to 90 percent of employees leave for reasons related not </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> to the level of pay but to the job, the manager, the culture, or the work environment. </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> These internal reasons—also known as “push” factors, as opposed to </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> “pull” factors such as a better-paying outside opportunity—are within the </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> power of the organization and the manager to change and control. But you </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> can’t change what you don’t know. It is a simple case of “when you don’t know </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> what’s causing the problem, you can’t expect to fix it.” </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> This disconcerting disconnect between what managers believe and the reality— </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> the true root causes of employee disengagement and turnover—is costing </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> businesses in the billions of dollars per year. (See Figure 1.1.) </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> The Saratoga Institute estimated the cost of losing the average employee </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> to be one times annual salary. This means that a company with three hundred </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> employees, an average employee salary of $35,000, and a voluntary turnover </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> rate of 15 percent a year is losing $1,575,000 per year in turnover costs alone. </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> If, for the sake of illustration, 70 percent of this company’s forty-five yearly </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> voluntary turnovers—thirty-one employees—are avoidable, then the company, </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> by correcting the root causes, could be saving $1,102,500 per year.This </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> should be enough to make most CEOs raise their eyebrows and take action. </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> Just looking at turnover costs doesn’t tell the whole story, however. Long </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> before many employees leave, they become disengaged. Disengaged employees </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> are uncommitted, marginally productive, frequently absent, or, in the case </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> of the actively disengaged, actually working against the interests of the company. </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> The Gallup Organization reports that 70 percent of the American workforce </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> is either disengaged or actively disengaged. (See Figure 1.2.) </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> Actively disengaged workers can be particularly destructive to morale and </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> revenues, for these are the workers who seek to disrupt, complain, have accidents, </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> steal from the company, and occupy the time and attention of managers </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> that would be far better spent dealing with other workers. </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> The cost to the U.S. economy of disengaged employees is estimated to be </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> somewhere between $254 and $363 billion annually. The cost of absenteeism </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> alone, a signal symptom of disengagement, is estimated to be $40 billion per </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> year. </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> Most of the mind-boggling costs accumulate from the loss of sales revenue </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> caused by customers’ disappointing interactions with disengaged employees, </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> many of whom are turnovers waiting to happen. Simply put, employee disengagement </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> creates customer disengagement, and employee defections create </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> customer defections. </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> Breaking it down further,Gallup found that “top-quartile workgroups (on </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> employee engagement surveys) have: </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> 12 Percent Higher Customer Metrics </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> 18 Percent Higher Productivity </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> 16 Percent Higher Profitability </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> 37 Percent Lower Absenteeism </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> 25 Percent Lower Turnover (in Low-Turnover Organizations) </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> 49 Percent Lower Turnover (in High-Turnover Organizations) </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> 27 Percent Less Theft </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> 49 Percent Fewer Safety Incidents </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> 41 Percent Fewer Patient Safety Incidents </p> 60 Percent Fewer Quality Incidents (Defects <p style="margin-top: 0"> </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> So, the best reason to be concerned about understanding the root causes </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> of voluntary employee turnover and disengagement is an economic one. It’s </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> not about being nice to employees just to be nice, although civility is a standard </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> of behavior to be prized in itself. It’s about taking care of employees so </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> that they will then feel good about taking care of customers.9 The good news </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> is that engaged employees actually create happy customers. So, if we can commit </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> to correctly identifying the root causes of employee disengagement and if </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> we can address these root causes with on-target solutions that increase the </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> engagement of our workers,we will see tangible results in the form of reduced </p> <p style="margin-top: 0"> turnover costs and increased revenues. </p> </body></html>
Reviews
Review Quotes
"I strongly recommend Branham's updated book for managers and business owners who need to address employee retention for a better bottom line." -- Quality Service Marketing
"...provides an arsenal of innovative strategies to help business leaders and managers keep the people upon which their company depends." -- Alan Caruba's BookViews
"The book examines factors such as manager relationships, lack of trust in senior leadership, company culture and integrity, salary and benefits, and more-revealing what can be done to hold on to the people who provide the most value to the organization." -- Recognize Service Excellence blog
"The editors at Elite Professionals recommend this important book for every employer, manager and supervisor Anyone dealing with the recruitment or management of employees!" - Elite Professionals Magazine
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Back Cover Copy
Most managers blame employee turnover on the lure of other companies...even when the real issues are well within their control. Based on research conducted by the prestigious Saratoga Instituteand now extensively revised and bolstered by the results of an all-new post-exit surveythe second edition of The 7 Hidden Reasons Employees Leave provides an uncommonly candid account of why your company may be losing its best people. From poor management practices to toxic work­place cultures, the book helps you identify the "push" factors in your organization, and mitigate or eliminate all of them. Examining dynamics such as manager relationships, lack of trust in senior leadership, company culture and integrity, salary, and benefits, and more, this thoroughly updated edition shows you how to align employee expectations with the realities of the position, avoid job person mismatches, and provide feedback and coaching that breed employee confidence. Surprising and practical, this profoundly valuable book holds the secrets to retaining the people who make your company the best it can be. Praise for the First Edition of The 7 Hidden Reasons Employees Leave : "In this book, Branham has turned the tables on retention. His concept of pull-versus-push factors is a great insight. Many people are not pulled out of an organization by a better offer. They are pushed to the door so that when a better offer comes along it is easy to take the last step across the threshold. Every one of the seven reasons Leigh cites for turnover are preventable and not expensive. From selection for fit, to on-the-job support, to being valued, the organization has the power to keep almost anyone they want. Having outlined the problem, Leigh then provides over 50 ways to engage and keep people. This is an invaluable guidebook on retention." Dr. Jac Fitz-enz , Founder & CEO, Human Capital Source; author of The ROI of Human Capital "Any book that can give you ideas that help you retain just one employee is worth the cover price many times over. Leigh Branham's book can help you hold on to your best. It's chock full of practical examples and suggestions, best practices, and inspiring stories. Highly recommended." Robert Levering , coauthor of Fortune's "100 Best Companies to Work for" list; cofounder of the Great Place to Work® Institute
Back Cover Copy
Most managers blame employee turnover on the lure of other companies...even when the real issues are well within their control. Based on research conducted by the prestigious Saratoga Instituteand now extensively revised and bolstered by the results of an all-new post-exit surveythe second edition of The 7 Hidden Reasons Employees Leave provides an uncommonly candid account of why your company may be losing its best people. From poor management practices to toxic workplace cultures, the book helps you identify the "push" factors in your organization, and mitigate or eliminate all of them. Examining dynamics such as manager relationships, lack of trust in senior leadership, company culture and integrity, salary, and benefits, and more, this thoroughly updated edition shows you how to align employee expectations with the realities of the position, avoid job person mismatches, and provide feedback and coaching that breed employee confidence. Surprising and practical, this profoundly valuable book holds the secrets to retaining the people who make your company the best it can be. Praise for the First Edition of The 7 Hidden Reasons Employees Leave : "In this book, Branham has turned the tables on retention. His concept of pull-versus-push factors is a great insight. Many people are not pulled out of an organization by a better offer. They are pushed to the door so that when a better offer comes along it is easy to take the last step across the threshold. Every one of the seven reasons Leigh cites for turnover are preventable and not expensive. From selection for fit, to on-the-job support, to being valued, the organization has the power to keep almost anyone they want. Having outlined the problem, Leigh then provides over 50 ways to engage and keep people. This is an invaluable guidebook on retention." Dr. Jac Fitz-enz , Founder & CEO, Human Capital Source; author of The ROI of Human Capital "Any book that can give you ideas that help you retain just one employee is worth the cover price many times over. Leigh Branham's book can help you hold on to your best. It's chock full of practical examples and suggestions, best practices, and inspiring stories. Highly recommended." Robert Levering , coauthor of Fortune's "100 Best Companies to Work for" list; cofounder of the Great Place to Work Institute
Bowker Data Service Summary
'The 7 Hidden Reasons Employees Leave' reveals what organisations can do to identify, prevent, and correct the root causes of preventable turnover.
Main Description
Most managers blame employee turnover on the lure of other companies... even when the real issues are well within their control. Based on research conducted by the prestigious Saratoga Institute-and now extensively revised and bolstered by the results of an all-new post-exit survey-the second edition of The 7 Hidden Reasons Employees Leave provides an uncommonly candid account of why your company may be losing its best people. From poor management practices to toxic workplace cultures, the book helps you identify the "push" factors in your organization, and mitigate or eliminate all of them. Examining dynamics such as manager relationships, lack of trust in senior leadership, company culture and integrity, salary, and benefits, and more, this thoroughly updated edition shows you how to align employee expectations with the realities of the position, avoid job-person mismatches, and provide feedback and coaching that breed employee confidence. Surprising and practical, this profoundly valuable book holds the secrets to retaining the people who make your company the best it can be. Book jacket.
Main Description
People are four times more likely to leave a job because of something going on in the office than for an outside opportunity. Yet most managers blame employee turnover on the lure of other companies. . . even when the real factors are well within their . Based on research performed by the prestigious Saratoga Institute, 'The 7 Hidden Reasons Employees Leave' provides readers with real solutions for the costly problem of employee turnover. Now incorporating the results of the author's "Decision to Leave" post-exit survey, the second edition features new research in employee engagement as well as innovative best practices for engaging and retaining in a down economy. Readers will learn how to align employee expectations with the realities of the position, avoid job-person mismatches, and provide feedback and coaching that breed employee confidence. The book examines factors such as manager relationships, lack of trust in senior leadership, company culture and integrity, salary and benefits, and more-revealing what can be done to hold on to the people who provide the most value to the organization.
Main Description
People are four times more likely to leave a job because of something going on in the office than for an outside opportunity. Yet most managers blame employee turnover on the lure of other companies. . . even when the real factors are well within their control. Based on research performed by the prestigious Saratoga Institute, 'The 7 Hidden Reasons Employees Leave' provides readers with real solutions for the costly problem of employee turnover. Now incorporating the results of the author's "Decision to Leave" post-exit survey, the second edition features new research in employee engagement as well as innovative best practices for engaging and retaining in a down economy. Readers will learn how to align employee expectations with the realities of the position, avoid job-person mismatches, and provide feedback and coaching that breed employee confidence. The book examines factors such as manager relationships, lack of trust in senior leadership, company culture and integrity, salary and benefits, and more - revealing what can be done to hold on to the people who provide the most value to the organization.
Main Description
People are four times more likely to leave a job because of something going on in the office than for an outside opportunity. Yet most managers blame employee turnover on the lure of other companies. . . even when the real factors are well within their control. Based on research performed by the prestigious Saratoga Institute, 'The 7 Hidden Reasons Employees Leave' provides readers with real solutions for the costly problem of employee turnover. Now incorporating the results of the author's "Decision to Leave" post-exit survey, the second edition features new research in employee engagement as well as innovative best practices for engaging and retaining in a down economy. Readers will learn how to align employee expectations with the realities of the position, avoid job-person mismatches, and provide feedback and coaching that breed employee confidence. The book examines factors such as manager relationships, lack of trust in senior leadership, company culture and integrity, salary and benefits, and more-revealing what can be done to hold on to the people who provide the most value to the organization.
Main Description
People are four times more likely to leave a job because of something going on in the office than for an outside opportunity. Yet most managers blame employee turnover on the lure of other companies. . . even when the real factors are well within their control. Based on research performed by the prestigious Saratoga Institute, The 7 Hidden Reasons Employees Leave provides readers with real solutions for the costly problem of employee turnover. Now incorporating the results of the author's "Decision to Leave" post-exit survey, the second edition features new research in employee engagement as well as innovative best practices for engaging and retaining in a down economy. Readers will learn how to align employee expectations with the realities of the position, avoid job - person mismatches, and provide feedback and coaching that breed employee confidence. The book examines factors such as manager relationships, lack of trust in senior leadership, company culture and integrity, salary and benefits, and more - revealing what can be done to hold on to the people who provide the most value to the organization.
Main Description
People are four times more likely to leave a job because of something going on in the office than for an outside opportunity. Yet most managers blame employee turnover on the lure of other companies. . . even when the real factors are well within their control. Based on research performed by the prestigious Saratoga Institute, The 7 Hidden Reasons Employees Leave provides readers with real solutions for the costly problem of employee turnover. Now incorporating the results of the author's "Decision to Leave" post-exit survey, the second edition features new research in employee engagement as well as innovative best practices for engaging and retaining in a down economy. Readers will learn how to align employee expectations with the realities of the position, avoid jobperson mismatches, and provide feedback and coaching that breed employee confidence. The book examines factors such as manager relationships, lack of trust in senior leadership, company culture and integrity, salary and benefits, and morerevealing what can be done to hold on to the people who provide the most value to the organization.
Main Description
People are four times more likely to leave a job because of something going on in the office than for an outside opportunity. Yet most managers blame employee turnover on the lure of other companies. . . even when the real factors are well within their control. Based on research performed by the prestigious Saratoga Institute, The 7 Hidden Reasons Employees Leave provides readers with real solutions for the costly problem of employee turnover. Now incorporating the results of the author's ôDecision to Leaveö post-exit survey, the second edition features new research in employee engagement as well as innovative best practices for engaging and retaining in a down economy. Readers will learn how to align employee expectations with the realities of the position, avoid jobûperson mismatches, and provide feedback and coaching that breed employee confidence. The book examines factors such as manager relationships, lack of trust in senior leadership, company culture and integrity, salary and benefits, and moreùrevealing what can be done to hold on to the people who provide the most value to the organization.
Main Description
People are four times more likely to leave a job because of something going on in the office than for an outside opportunity. Yet most managers blame employee turnover on the lure of other companies. . . even when the real factors are well within their control. Based on research performed by the prestigious Saratoga Institute, The 7 Hidden Reasons Employees Leave provides readers with real solutions for the costly problem of employee turnover. Now incorporating the results of the author¿s ¿Decision to Leave¿ post-exit survey, the second edition features new research in employee engagement as well as innovative best practices for engaging and retaining in a down economy. Readers will learn how to align employee expectations with the realities of the position, avoid job¿person mismatches, and provide feedback and coaching that breed employee confidence. The book examines factors such as manager relationships, lack of trust in senior leadership, company culture and integrity, salary and benefits, and more¿revealing what can be done to hold on to the people who provide the most value to the organization.
Table of Contents
Forewordp. xi
Why Care About Why they Leave?p. 1
Why Many Managers Don't Carep. 2
Managers Cannot Hear What Workers Will Not Speakp. 3
The Real Costs of Avoidable Turnoverp. 4
Turnover: Just an Unavoidable "Cost of Doing Business"?p. 6
Recent History: When the Tide Turns, Mindsets Must Changep. 6
What About HR's Role in Exit Interviewing?p. 9
How they Disengage and Quitp. 11
Events That Trigger Employee Disengagementp. 12
The "Last Straw" That Breaks the Employee-Employer Bondp. 13
The Active-Seeking Phase of the Departure Processp. 18
Why they Leave: What the Research Revealsp. 21
Why Employees Say They Leavep. 24
Survey Comments Confirm the Survey Datap. 25
Have the Reasons for Leaving Changed Since the Great Recession?p. 27
What the New Data Revealp. 29
A Few More Words About Payp. 33
Respecting the Differencesp. 34
Who Has the Power to Meet These Needs?p. 35
The Next Seven Chapters: Hidden Reasons and Practical Actionp. 35
Reason #1: the Job or Workplace was not as Expectedp. 38
Hidden Mutual Expectations: The Psychological Contractp. 41
How to Recognize the Warning Signs of Unmet Expectations: During and After the Interviewp. 44
Obstacles to Meeting Mutual Expectationsp. 45
Engagement Practices 1-8: Matching Mutual Expectationsp. 46
How Prospective Employees Can Do Their Partp. 51
The Beginning or the End of Trustp. 51
Engagement Practices Checklist: Meeting Expectationsp. 51
Reason #2: the Mismatch Between Job and Personp. 53
What's Missing-A Passion for Matchingp. 55
Recognizing the Signs of Job-Person Mismatchp. 58
Most Common Obstacles to Preventing and Correcting Job-Person Mismatchp. 58
Engagement Practices for Matching Job and Personp. 59
Best Practices for Talent Selectionp. 60
Best Practices for Engaging and Re-Engaging Through Job Task Assignmentp. 68
Best Practices for Job Enrichmentp. 70
The Employee's Role in the Matching Processp. 72
Engagement Practices Checklist: Job-Person Matchingp. 73
Reason #3: Too Little Coaching and Feedbackp. 75
Why Coaching and Feedback Are Important to Engagement and Retentionp. 77
Why Don't Managers Provide Coaching and Feedback?p. 78
Recognizing the Signsp. 79
More Than an Event: It's About the Relationshipp. 80
Engagement Practices for Coaching and Giving Feedbackp. 82
What the Employee Can Do to Get More Feedback and Coachingp. 94
Engagement Practices Checklist: Coaching and Feedbackp. 96
Reason #4: Too Few Growth and Advancement Opportunitiesp. 98
What They Are Really Sayingp. 100
Employers of Choice Start by Understanding the New Career Realitiesp. 102
Recognizing the Signs of Blocked Growth and Career Frustrationp. 104
Best Practices for Creating Growth and Advancement Opportunitiesp. 106
What Employees Can Do to Create Their Own Growth and Advancement Opportunitiesp. 122
Engagement Practices Checklist: Growth and Advancement Opportunitiesp. 123
Reason #5: Feeling Devalued and Unrecognizedp. 126
Why Managers Are Reluctant to Recognize Employees' Effortsp. 130
Recognizing the Signs That Employees Feel Devalued and Unrecognizedp. 131
Pay: The Most Emotional Issue of Allp. 132
Pay Practices That Engage and Retainp. 133
What Employees Can Do to Be More Valued and Better Recognizedp. 152
Engagement Practices Checklist: Feeling Devalued and Unrecognizedp. 153
Reason #6: Stress From Overwork and Work-Life Imbalancep. 156
How Big a Problem Is Stress?p. 158
Causes of Increased Stressp. 159
Signs That Your Workers May Be Stressed Out or Overworkedp. 160
Healthy versus Toxic Culturesp. 161
More Than Just the Right Thing to Dop. 162
How Three of the Best Places in America to Work Do Itp. 164
What These Employers Have in Commonp. 166
You're Not Competing Just with the "Big Boys"p. 166
What the Employee Can Do to Relieve Stress and Overworkp. 181
Engagement Practices Checklist: Overwork and Work-Life Imbalancep. 183
Reason #7: Loss of Trust and Confidence in Senior Leadersp. 185
A Crisis of Trust and Confidencep. 188
Reading the Signs of Distrust and Doubtp. 189
The Three Questions That Employees Need Answeredp. 189
Criteria for Evaluating Whether to Trust and Have Confidencep. 190
What the Employee Can Do to Build Reciprocal Trust and Confidencep. 199
Engagement Practices Checklist: Building Trust and Confidencep. 200
Planning to Become an Employer of Choicep. 202
Talent Engagement Strategies in Actionp. 204
What Do We Learn from These Success Stories?p. 213
Linking Talent and Business Objectivesp. 213
Linking the Right Measures to Business Resultsp. 214
Creating an Employer-of-Choice Scorecardp. 215
The Plan Works… If You Work the Planp. 218
Partners in Working the Planp. 220
Summary Checklist of Employer-of-Choice Engagement Practicesp. 223
Guidelines and Considerations for Exit Interviewing/Surveying and Turnover Analysisp. 227
Indexp. 235
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