Catalogue

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Writing medieval women's lives [electronic resource] /
edited by Charlotte Newman Goldy and Amy Livingstone.
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2012.
description
xii, 294 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
9780230114555 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
More Details
series title
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2012.
isbn
9780230114555 (hardback)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
abstract
"Medieval women's history is entering a new stage. In the last thirty years medievalists have recovered the sources about women, and have moved women to the foreground of narratives to view society from their vantage point. Prosopographic methods have been implemented to learn about the least documented women though they often lack a human face. This volume responds to various questions of how historians are asking. Can we go beyond the most powerful of women while retaining the personal aspect possible with a biographical approach? How can we write about the mundane aspects of female life rarely deemed worthy of textual mention? How far can we extrapolate from our fragmentary sources and yet remain historical? Scholars working on the history of early modern women have already demonstrated that we can write about women who left only fragmentary evidence of their lives as compelling and illuminating history in part by experimenting with narrative structures. The work in this volume demonstrates that techniques used by these historians can be equally fruitful in writing a more complete history of medieval women. The historians in this collection are looking for ways to expand the ways we examine and write about medieval women. They are interested in the great and the obscure, and women from different times and places. They all attempt to get closer to the life as lived, personified in individual stories. As such, these essays prompt us to rethink what we can know about women, how we can know it, and how we can write about them to expand our insights"--
catalogue key
8569438
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [267]-275) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Charlotte Newman Goldy is an associate professor of History at Miami University. She is the author of The Anglo-Norman Nobility in the Reign of Henry I, The Second Generation, "The Shiftiness of a Woman: Narratizing the Anstey Case" in Historical Reflections/Rflexions historiques, and "A Thirteenth-Century Anglo-Jewish Woman Crossing Boundaries: Visible and Invisible" in The Journal of Medieval History. Amy Livingstone is a professor of History at Wittenberg University. She is co-editor of the journal Medieval Prosopography. She is author of Out of Love for My Kin: Aristocratic Family Life in the Lands of the Loire, 1000-1200, several articles on medieval women and aristocratic family life, and co-editor of Medieval Monks: ideals and Realities: Essays in Honor of Richard E. Sullivan.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2013-03-01:
In this latest volume in "The New Middle Ages" series, Goldy (Miami Univ.) and Livingstone (Wittenberg Univ.) have collected 13 fascinating essays that not only tease out the lives of several previously unexamined women, but also explore the multiplicity of sources for understanding medieval lives. The papers address an impressive variety of women across time, space, and the socioeconomic spectrum. Two unifying themes hold these disparate essays together: "Rereading Sources" and "Seeking the Undocumented." The juxtaposition of such diverse women as two Carolingian cloth workers, "Muriel, a Jew of Oxford," and Evpraksia Vsevolodovna, just to name a few, highlights the common difficulty of piecing together the history of medieval women and presents interesting new approaches to this enterprise. These approaches are the truly significant element of the volume. Many of the essays employ prosopographical techniques to fill lacunae in the evidence; as the editors say, many of the conclusions are speculative, but all of the authors are careful to lay out clearly the limitations of the sources and therefore the uncertainty of the interpretations. Useful bibliography of secondary sources. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. J. M. Pope Hiram College
Reviews
Review Quotes
'In this latest volume in "The New Middle Ages" series, Goldy (Miami Univ.) and Livingstone (Wittenberg Univ.) have collected 13 fascinating essays that not only tease out the lives of several previously unexamined women, but also explore the multiplicity of sources for understanding medieval lives...Summing Up: Highly recommended.' -Choice 'The essays in this methodologically rich collection examine women's lives from a diversity of backgrounds in regions throughout Europe, and spanning periods from the Carolingian Era to the late Middle Ages. Using textiles, itineraries, charters, chronicles, parish records, letters, images, and more these engaging essays not only bring to life a variety of medieval women, but suggest new avenues for answering old questions about the realities of women's lives in the past. They are worthy successors to classic works of feminist scholarship such as Becoming Visible and Women and Power in the Middle Ages, and will collectively and individually shape future approaches to medieval women's history.' - Miriam Shadis, Ohio University 'No other collection ranges so widely-six countries plus the Carolingians-or scales the ladder from peasants to townsfolk to noble and royal women. Women's voices and women's lives are now the most interesting and challenging entre into the European Middle Ages. This collection has something for every taste, every interest, every line of research.' - Joel Rosenthal, Stony Brook University
"In this latest volume in "The New Middle Ages" series, Goldy (Miami Univ.) and Livingstone (Wittenberg Univ.) have collected 13 fascinating essays that not only tease out the lives of several previously unexamined women, but also explore the multiplicity of sources for understanding medieval lives ... Summing Up: Highly recommended." - Choice "The essays in this methodologically rich collection examine women's lives from a diversity of backgrounds in regions throughout Europe, and spanning periods from the Carolingian Era to the late Middle Ages. Using textiles, itineraries, charters, chronicles, parish records, letters, images, and more these engaging essays not only bring to life a variety of medieval women, but suggest new avenues for answering old questions about the realities of women's lives in the past. They are worthy successors to classic works of feminist scholarship such as Becoming Visible and Women and Power in the Middle Ages, and will collectively and individually shape future approaches to medieval women's history." - Miriam Shadis, Ohio University "No other collection ranges so widely - six countries plus the Carolingians - or scales the ladder from peasants to townsfolk to noble and royal women. Women's voices and women's lives are now the most interesting and challenging entre into the European Middle Ages. This collection has something for every taste, every interest, every line of research." - Joel Rosenthal, Stony Brook University
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, March 2013
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This is a collection of essays representing the growing variety of approaches used to write the history of medieval women. They reflect the European medieval world socially, geographically and across religious boundaries, engaging directly with how the medieval women's experience was reconstructed, as well as what the experience was.
Description for Bookstore
A discussion of the many ways in which the experiences of Medieval women are approached and represented
Long Description
Medieval women's history is entering a new stage. In the last thirty years medievalists have recovered the sources about women, and have moved women to the foreground of narratives to view society from their vantage point. Prosopographic methods have been implemented to learn about the least documented women though they often lack a human face. This volume responds to various questions of how historians are asking. Can we go beyond the most powerful of women while retaining the personal aspect possible with a biographical approach? How can we write about the mundane aspects of female life rarely deemed worthy of textual mention? How far can we extrapolate from our fragmentary sources and yet remain historical? Scholars working on the history of early modern women have already demonstrated that we can write about women who left only fragmentary evidence of their lives as compelling and illuminating history in part by experimenting with narrative structures. The work in this volume demonstrates that techniques used by these historians can be equally fruitful in writing a more complete history of medieval women. The historians in this collection are looking for ways to expand the ways we examine and write about medieval women. They are interested in the great and the obscure, and women from different times and places. They all attempt to get closer to the life as lived, personified in individual stories. As such, these essays prompt us to rethink what we can know about women, how we can know it, and how we can write about them to expand our insights.
Library of Congress Summary
"Medieval women's history is entering a new stage. In the last thirty years medievalists have recovered the sources about women, and have moved women to the foreground of narratives to view society from their vantage point. Prosopographic methods have been implemented to learn about the least documented women though they often lack a human face. This volume responds to various questions of how historians are asking. Can we go beyond the most powerful of women while retaining the personal aspect possible with a biographical approach? How can we write about the mundane aspects of female life rarely deemed worthy of textual mention? How far can we extrapolate from our fragmentary sources and yet remain historical? Scholars working on the history of early modern women have already demonstrated that we can write about women who left only fragmentary evidence of their lives as compelling and illuminating history in part by experimenting with narrative structures. The work in this volume demonstrates that techniques used by these historians can be equally fruitful in writing a more complete history of medieval women. The historians in this collection are looking for ways to expand the ways we examine and write about medieval women. They are interested in the great and the obscure, and women from different times and places. They all attempt to get closer to the life as lived, personified in individual stories. As such, these essays prompt us to rethink what we can know about women, how we can know it, and how we can write about them to expand our insights"--
Main Description
Medieval women's history is entering a new stage. In the last thirty years medievalists have recovered the sources about women, and have moved women to the foreground of narratives to view society from their vantage point. The historians in this collection are looking for ways to expand the ways we examine and write about medieval women. They are interested in the great and the obscure, and women from different times and places. All attempt to get closer to the life as lived, personified in individual stories. As such, these essays prompt us to rethink what we can know about medieval women, how we can know it, and how we can write about them to expand our insights.
Main Description
Medieval women's history is entering a new stage. In the last thirty years medievalists have recovered the sources about women, and have moved women to the foreground of narratives to view society from their vantage point.The historians in this collection are looking for ways to expand the ways we examine and write about medieval women. They are interested in the great and the obscure, and women from different times and places. All attempt to get closer to the life as lived, personified in individual stories. As such, these essays prompt us to rethink what we can know about medieval women, how we can know it, and how we can write about them to expand our insights.
Table of Contents
List of Figures and Tablep. xiii
Acknowledgmentsp. xv
Introduction: Setting the Scenep. 1
Rereading Sources
The Foundation Legend of Godstow Abbey: A Holy Woman's Life in Anglo-Norman Versep. 13
Remembering Countess Delphine's Books: Reading as a Means to Shape a Holy Woman's Sanctityp. 33
The Letters of Princess Sophia of Hungary, a Nun at Admontp. 51
The Missing Rusian Women: The Case of Evpraksia Vsevolodovnap. 69
Leaving Warboys: Emigration from a Fifteenth-Century English Villagep. 85
Women as Legal Agents in Late Medieval Genoap. 113
Piecing Together the Fragments: Telling the Lives of the ladies of Lavardin through Image and Textp. 131
Seeking the Undocumented
Girlindis and Alpais: Telling the Lives of Two Textile Fabricators in the Carolingian Empirep. 155
Agents or Pawns? The Experiences of the Peasant Women of Roussillon in the Blanquet Family Parchments, 1292-1345p. 173
Joan de Valence: A Lady of Substancep. 193
Royal Women in Late Medieval Spain: Catalina of Lancaster, Leonor of Albuquerque, and MarĂ­a of Castilep. 209
Muriel, a Jew of Oxford: Using the Dramatic to Understand the Mundane in Anglo-Norman Townsp. 227
Well-Behaved Women Can Make History: Women's Friendships in Late Medieval Westminsterp. 247
Select Bibliography of Secondary Sourcesp. 267
List of Contributorsp. 277
Indexp. 281
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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