Catalogue


Theory and practice in the philosophy of David Hume [electronic resource] /
James Wiley.
imprint
Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire ; New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2012.
description
vi, 328 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
1137026413 (hbk.), 9781137026415 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Subjects
personal subject
More Details
imprint
Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire ; New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2012.
isbn
1137026413 (hbk.)
9781137026415 (hbk.)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Hume and the problem of theory and practice in philosophy and political theory -- Hume's naturalism and skepticism in the treatise and his appeal from theory to practice -- The systematic theory of theory of the treatise of human nature -- The behaviorist theory of practice of the treatise -- The practical philosophies of skepticism and commercial humanism -- The common sense theory of theory of the enquiries, essays, and history of England -- The common sense theory of practice of the later works -- Hume, theory, and practice today.
catalogue key
8569113
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 257-319) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
James Wiley has taught at a number of universities across the USA including the Johns Hopkins University and most recently Western Michigan University.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2013-07-01:
Humans not only do a lot--science, medicine, the arts, politics, law, commerce, and more--they reflect on what they do. Hence the distinction between theory and practice: theories attempt to understand, explain, justify, or improve practices. Wiley (independent scholar) is interested in Hume's views concerning the relation of theory and practice in the two main phases of his philosophical development. Hume's early Treatise of Human Nature assumed a sharp distinction between theory and practice, and attempted to provide a theoretical foundation of knowledge, politics, and morality based on a naturalistic theory of human nature. Since the theory was constructed by introspectively examining ideas, it inevitably collapsed into radical skepticism. And the only escape from this skeptical crisis is practice, a reengagement with the everyday activities of ordinary life. In Hume's post-Treatise writings the sharp distinction between theory and practice is abandoned, and reflections on human practices are guided by common sense tempered by a moderate skepticism. In addition to tracing the development of Hume's philosophy through the frame of the theory/practice debate, this book provides a comprehensive and illuminating account of Hume's thought. It will be a useful acquisition for libraries supporting graduate programs in philosophy or political science. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate students and above. D. Haugen Western Illinois University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, July 2013
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This volume offers an original interpretation of Hume's philosophy, as centred on the relationship between theory and practice. It argues that Hume's essays represent a humanist practical philosophy derived from the speculative philosophy of 'A Treatise of Human Nature' and the 'enquiries'.
Description for Bookstore
An examination of the relationships between theory and practice, and speculative and practical philosophy, in Hume's philosophy and political theory
Long Description
The author argues that the relationship between theory and practice was central to Hume, that he developed two theories of theory and practice (one in the Treatise of Human Nature, which separates theory and practice, another in the Enquiries, which links them), that the secular speculative philosophy of human nature in the Treatise leads to the humanist practical philosophy of Hume's Essays, Moral, Political and Literary and History of England, and that the foundations of Hume's political theory are history and political realism rather than custom and tradition. Although Hume is usually considered a skeptic and the originator of the 'is/ought' distinction, he genuinely believed that 'the life of virtue' is happiest and that this conclusion derived equally from philosophy and common sense. The author argues for the continuing relevance of Hume's views on human nature, common sense, practical philosophy, ethics and humanism.
Main Description
The author argues that the relationship between theory and practice was central to Hume, that he developedtwotheories of theory and practice (one in theTreatise of Human Nature, which separates theory and practice, another in theEnquiries, which links them), that the secular speculative philosophy of human nature in theTreatiseleads to the humanist practical philosophy of Hume'sEssays, Moral, Political and LiteraryandHistory of England, and that the foundations of Hume's political theory are history and political realism rather than custom and tradition. Although Hume is usually considered a skeptic and the originator of the 'is/ought' distinction, he genuinely believed that 'the life of virtue' is happiest and that this conclusion derived equally from philosophy and common sense. The author argues for the continuing relevance of Hume's views on human nature, common sense, practical philosophy, ethics and humanism.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. vi
Hume and the Problem of Theory and Practice in Philosophy and Political Theoryp. 1
Hume's Naturalism and Skepticism in the Treatise and His Appeal from Theory to Practicep. 27
The Systematic Theory of Theory of the Treatise of Human Naturep. 62
The Behaviorist Theory of Practice of the Treatisep. 81
The Practical Philosophies of Skepticism and Commercial Humanismp. 110
The Common Sense Theory of Theory in the Enquiries, Essays and History of Englandp. 165
The Common Sense Theory of Practice of the Later Worksp. 203
Hume, Theory and Practice Todayp. 226
Notesp. 257
Bibliographyp. 311
Indexp. 321
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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