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Parties and people [electronic resource] : England 1914-1951 /
Ross McKibbin.
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2010.
description
viii, 207 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
9780199584697 (hardback : acid-free paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2010.
isbn
9780199584697 (hardback : acid-free paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Edwardian equipoise and the First World War -- Unstable equilibrium, 1918-1929 -- The crisis of Labour and the Conservative hegemony, 1929-1939 -- The party system thrown off course -- The English road to socialism -- England : social change, historical accident, and democracy.
general note
"The Ford lectures delivered in the University of Oxford in Hilary term 2008."
catalogue key
8568156
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
McKibbin argues that the kind of democracy that emerged in Britain was far from inevitable-as much historical accident as design-and was in many ways highly flawed.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2011-02-01:
Were English party politics from 1914 to 1951 shaped primarily by contingency or by fundamental social structures? What determined voting behavior? What kind of democracy emerged in England following the introduction of universal suffrage in 1928, and why did it take this form? McKibbin (Oxford) perceptively addresses these issues in this collection of Ford Lectures originally presented at the University of Oxford in 2008. Although he acknowledges the importance of contingency, such as the 1931 economic crisis that made the Conservative Party dominant, McKibbin views class as the fundamental force shaping electoral behavior. The degree to which class shaped voting has been less important for the working class than for those above it, and was less important prior to 1940 than afterward. Although this is not an archival-based study, it is an excellent guide to current thinking on these issues, and should be very useful for students as well as faculty concerned with the social basis of British politics. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All academic levels/libraries. H. L. Smith University of Houston--Victoria
Reviews
Review Quotes
A model of careful scholarship
An elegant and engaging addition to the history of English democracy.
An excellent guide to current thinking on these issues, and should be very useful for students as well as faculty concerned with the social basis of British politics. Highly recommended.
an outstanding piece of scholarship: it is a major original contribution to the field ... a path-breaking work that will demand attention of all those working on the period.
[A] subtly argued study.
offer[s] a fascinating discussion ... This book can be read and enjoyed by the general reader as we ll as the academic specialist
Ross McKibbin has encouraged a rich and complex approach to British history. We are all in his debt.
The distillation of a lifetime's reflection, and as compelling as it is engaging. The historian's art at its most disciplined and distinguished.
The political history so readably, as well as convincingly, analysed by McKibbin has plenty of dramatic surprises and unexpected reversals of fortune.
This is a book that is certainly well written and offers a beguiling explanation of the events that created England's present, but far from inevitable, system of democracy. It deserves to be widely read.
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, February 2011
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
The 'sequel' to his best-selling Classes and Cultures, Ross McKibbin's latest book is a powerful reinterpretation of British politics in the first decades of universal suffrage. What did it mean to be a 'democratic society'? To what extent did voters make up their own minds on politics or allow elites to do it for them?Exploring the political culture of these extraordinary years, Parties and People shows that class became one of the principal determinants of political behaviour, although its influence was often surprisingly weak.McKibbin argues that the kind of democracy that emerged in Britain was far from inevitable-as much historical accident as design-and was in many ways highly flawed.
Main Description
The 'sequel' to his best-selling Classes and Cultures, Ross McKibbin's latest book is a powerful reinterpretation of British politics in the first decades of universal suffrage. What did it mean to be a 'democratic society'? To what extent did voters make up their own minds on politics orallow elites to do it for them?Exploring the political culture of these extraordinary years, Parties and People shows that class became one of the principal determinants of political behaviour, although its influence was often surprisingly weak.McKibbin argues that the kind of democracy that emerged in Britain was far from inevitable-as much historical accident as design-and was in many ways highly flawed.
Main Description
The "sequel" to his best-sellingClasses and Cultures,Ross McKibbin's latest book is a powerful reinterpretation of British politics in the first decades of universal suffrage. What did it mean to be a "democratic society?" To what extent did voters make up their own minds on politics or allow elites to do it for them? Exploring the political culture of these extraordinary years,Parties and Peopleshows that class became one of the principal determinants of political behaviour, although its influence was often surprisingly weak. McKibbin argues that the kind of democracy that emerged in Britain was far from inevitable-as much historical accident as design-and was in many ways highly flawed.
Table of Contents
Edwardian Equipoise and the First World Warp. 33
Unstable Equilibrium, 1918-1929p. 33
The Crisis of Labour and the Conservative Hegemony, 1929-1939p. 69
The Party System Thrown Off Coursep. 106
The English Road to Socialismp. 140
England: Social Change, Historical Accident, and Democracyp. 177
Indexp. 203
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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