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Nation and nurture in seventeenth-century English literature [electronic resource] /
Rachel Trubowitz.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2012.
description
viii, 251 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
9780199604739 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2012.
isbn
9780199604739 (hardback)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8567946
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [230]-246) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Rachel Trubowitz is. Professor of English, University of New Hampshire.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2013-03-01:
Trubowitz (Univ. of New Hampshire) examines the reciprocal influence of figurations of nation and nursing in 17th-century England. As the figure of the nursing mother changed to reflect medical and religious developments, nursing became significant in post-Reformation politics imagining the nation as nurturing godly community. The author examines such discourses in images of nursing, Puritan domestic texts, Shakespeare, and Stuart political tracts, but she devotes the largest part of the book to Milton. In shifts developing across the prose works to the later poems, Trubowitz finds her most striking evidence of new significance for the nurture of nursing mothers in the reconstitution of England and its national character after the Reformation. As she points out, contestation over the meaning of nursing made its figure available to both old and new conceptions of government; cultural uses of the king as nursing father, from Isaiah, also complicate the gendering of the figure. By gendering ideas about nation and national identity, therefore, Trubowitz attempts a radical corrective to earlier modes of understanding politics in post-Reformation England. Despite some decisive breaks with earlier studies, this account seems better conceived as a useful supplement to them rather than a supersession. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate students, researchers, faculty. C. S. Vilmar Salisbury University
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This item was reviewed in:
Choice, March 2013
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Summaries
Long Description
Nation and Nurture in Seventeenth-Century English Literature connects changing seventeenth-century English views of maternal nurture to the rise of the modern nation, especially between 1603 and 1675. Maternal nurture gains new prominence in the early modern cultural imagination at the precise moment when England undergoes a major paradigm shift -- from the traditional, dynastic body politic, organized by organic bonds, to the post-dynastic, modern nation, comprised ofsymbolic and affective relations. The book also demonstrates that shifting early modern perspectives on Judeo-Christian relations deeply inform the period's interlocking reassessments of maternal nurture and the nation, especially in the case of Milton. The book's five chapters analyze a wide range of reformedand traditional texts, including A pitiless Mother, William Gouge's Of Domesticall Duties, Shakespeare's Macbeth, Charles I's Eikon Basilike, and Milton's Paradise Lost, and Samson Agonistes. Equal attention is paid to such early modern visual images as The power of women (a late sixteenth-century Dutch engraving), William Marshall's engraved frontispiece to Richard Braithwaite's The English Gentleman and Gentlewoman(1641), and Peter Paul Rubens's painting of Pero and Cimon or Roman Charity (1630). The book argues that competing early modern figurations of the nurturing mother mediate in politically implicated ways between customary biblical models of English kingship and innovative Hebraic/Puritan paradigms of Englishness.
Main Description
Nation and Nurture in Seventeenth-Century English Literature connects changing seventeenth-century English views of maternal nurture to the rise of the modern nation, especially between 1603 and 1675. Maternal nurture gains new prominence in the early modern cultural imagination at theprecise moment when England undergoes a major paradigm shift - from the traditional, dynastic body politic, organized by organic bonds, to the post-dynastic, modern nation, comprised of symbolic and affective relations. The book also demonstrates that shifting early modern perspectives onJudeo-Christian relations deeply inform the period's interlocking reassessments of maternal nurture and the nation, especially in the case of Milton. The book's five chapters analyze a wide range of reformed and traditional texts, including A pitiless Mother, William Gouge's Of Domesticall Duties, Shakespeare's Macbeth, Charles I's Eikon Basilike, and Milton's Paradise Lost, and Samson Agonistes. Equal attention is paid to such early modernvisual images as The power of women (a late sixteenth-century Dutch engraving), William Marshall's engraved frontispiece to Richard Braithwaite's The English Gentleman and Gentlewoman (1641), and Peter Paul Rubens's painting of Pero and Cimon or Roman Charity (1630). The book argues that competingearly modern figurations of the nurturing mother mediate in politically implicated ways between customary biblical models of English kingship and innovative Hebraic/Puritan paradigms of Englishness.
Main Description
This book connects changing seventeenth-century English views of maternal nurture to the rise of the modern nation, especially between 1603 and 1675. Maternal nurture gains new prominence in the early modern cultural imagination at the precise moment when England undergoes a major conceptual paradigm shift-from the traditional, dynastic body politic, organized by organic bonds, to the post-dynastic, modern nation, comprised of symbolic and affective relations.The book also demonstrates that shifting early modern perspectives on Judeo-Christian relations deeply inform the period's interlocking reassessments of maternal nurture and the nation, especially in the case of Milton. The book's five chapters analyze a wide range of reformed and traditional texts-including A pitiless Mother, William Gouge's Of Domesticall Duties, Shakespeare's Macbeth, Charles I's Eikon Basilike, and Milton's Paradise Lost, and SamsonAgonistes. Equal attention is paiearly modern visual images as The power of women (a late sixteenth-century Dutch engraving), William Marshall's engraved frontispiece to Richard Braithwaite's The English Gentleman and Gentlewoman (1641), and Peter Paul Rubens's painting of Pero and Cimon or Roman Charity (1630).
Table of Contents
List of Imagesp. x
List of Abbreviationsp. xi
Introductionp. 1
Nursing Mothers and National Identityp. 34
Natural Mothers and the Changing "Character" of Englishness:p. 66
Nursing Fathers and National Identityp. 94
Old Fathers and New Mothers: Supersession and the "unity of spirit" in Paradise Lostp. 146
"I was his nursling once": Internationalism and "nurture holy" in Samson Agonistesp. 188
Bibliographyp. 230
Indexp. 247
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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