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The master and the slave [electronic resource] : Lukács, Bakhtin, and the ideas of their time /
Galin Tihanov.
imprint
Oxford : Clarendon Press ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2000.
description
xiii, 327 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0198187254 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Oxford : Clarendon Press ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2000.
isbn
0198187254 (alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8567737
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [296]-319) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
A brilliant comparative study of the ideas of G. Lukács and M. Bakhtin ... will be essential reading for students and specialists of Bakhtin, Lukács, twentieth-century literary theory, aesthetics and the history of ideas in Russia and Germany
An intelligent and stimulating read ... Tihanov's study is a welcome contribution to twentieth-century intellectual history
... a very significant book for all those who are interested in the development of literary and cultural theoryin the inter-war period. It adds a new dimension to the debates discussed in Lunn' Marxism and Modernism and Jay's The Dialectical Imagination, and like these works it will prove an important resource in the intellectual history of Marxism and the theory of culture.
Closely and incisively argued, densely packed with ideas, arresting points and challenging arguments ... It should stimulate lively debate for a long time to come. One can hardly ask more of an academic study
Compelling new book ...
'covers so much important intellectual territory'Journal of European Studies, XXXI (2001)
"Galin Tihanov has written a spendidly researched and immensely informed intellectual history of two of the twentieth century's major theorists of the novel...each chapter of Tihanov's thoughtful book offers valuable insights into both of these vital thinkers...Tihanov's book remains a spendid achievement that will, I think, enrich the understanding of many interested readers. It is one of the most impressively, carefully researched books that I have ever read, and illuminates not only our understanding of Lukacs and Bakhtin, but the intellectual tradition which they inherited and to which they contributed." --Comparative Literature Studies "[A] compelling new book.... The strength of the book...is in Tihanov's remarkable range of reading, his knowledge of both German and Russian scholarship, and the philosophical backgrounds of the two writers--each steeped in the European academic tradition of the first half of the twentieth century. Both writers emerge transformed when treated in this way."--Simon Dentith, Times Literary Supplement "Tihanov is a brilliant historian of ideas and in The Master and the Slave he compares and contrasts the ideas of Lukacs and Bakhtin in connection with the novel and in the context of prevalent critical and philosophical ideas of their time.... Every library where Theory reigns needs it desperately."--Bibliotheque d'Humanisme et Renaissnce
"Galin Tihanov has written a spendidly researched and immensely informed intellectual history of two of the twentieth century's major theorists of the novel...each chapter of Tihanov's thoughtful book offers valuable insights into both of these vital thinkers...Tihanov's book remains a spendid achievement that will, I think, enrich the understanding of many interested readers. It is one of the most impressively, carefully researched books that I have ever read, and illuminates not only our understanding of Lukacs and Bakhtin, but the intellectual tradition which they inherited and to which they contributed." --Comparative Literature Studies "[A] compelling new book.... The strength of the book...is in Tihanov's remarkable range of reading, his knowledge of both German and Russian scholarship, and the philosophical backgrounds of the two writers--each steeped in the European academic tradition of the first half of the twentieth century. Both writers emerge transformed when treated in this way."--Simon Dentith, Times Literary Supplement "Tihanov is a brilliant historian of ideas and in The Master and the Slave he compares and contrasts the ideas of Lukàcs and Bakhtin in connection with the novel and in the context of prevalent critical and philosophical ideas of their time.... Every library where Theory reigns needs it desperately."-- Bibliothèque d'Humanisme et Renaissnce
"Galin Tihanov has written a spendidly researched and immensely informed intellectual history of two of the twentieth century's major theorists of the novel...each chapter of Tihanov's thoughtful book offers valuable insights into both of these vital thinkers...Tihanov's book remains a spendid achievement that will, I think, enrich the understanding of many interested readers. It is one of the most impressively, carefully researched books that I have ever read, and illuminates not only our understanding of Lukacs and Bakhtin, but the intellectual tradition which they inherited and to which they contributed." --Comparative Literature Studies "[A] compelling new book.... The strength of the book...is in Tihanov's remarkable range of reading, his knowledge of both German and Russian scholarship, and the philosophical backgrounds of the two writers--each steeped in the European academic tradition of the first half of the twentieth century. Both writers emerge transformed when treated in this way."--Simon Dentith,Times Literary Supplement "Tihanov is a brilliant historian of ideas and inThe Master and the Slavehe compares and contrasts the ideas of Luk cs and Bakhtin in connection with the novel and in the context of prevalent critical and philosophical ideas of their time.... Every library where Theory reigns needs it desperately."--Biblioth que d'Humanisme et Renaissnce
'Galin Tihanov has written a splendidly researched and immensely informed intellectual history of two of the twentieth century's major theorists of the novel.'Comparative Literature Studies
Galin Tihanov is a brilliant historian of ideas and in The Master and the Slave he compares and contrasts the ideas of Lukács and Bakhtin in connection with the novel and in the context of prevalent critical and philosophical ideas of their time. Anyone who has got anywhere near these two thinkers, especially Bakhtin, knows how easy it is to misunderstand them and how hard it is to be sure one does understand them. Tihanov can help. Every library where Theory reigns needs it desperately
Galin Tihanov's book ... should be heartily welcomed
Rich and spectacular study ... astonishingly precise insights crowd in on every page ... exceptionally impressive volume
'the strength of the book ... is in Tihanov's remarkable range of reading, his knowledge of both German and Russian scholarship, and the philosophical backgrounds of the two writers - each steeped in the European academic tradition of the first half of the twentieth century. Both writersemerge transformed when treated in this way.'Simon Dentith, TLS
'This is a brilliant comparative study of the ideas of G. Lukacs and M. Bakhtin.'Journal of European Studies, XXXI (2001)
'this study will, however, undoubtedly be come an unavoidable reference point'Simon Dentith, TLS
'Tihanov expresses abstract ideas clearly, and exhibits an impressive knowledge of the published and archival sources, German philosophy and the Russian intellectual context. His study is closely and incisively argued, densely packed with ideas, arresting points and challenging arguments. ...It should stimulate lively debate for a long time to come. One can hardly ask more of an academic study.'Journal of European Studies, XXXI (2001)
... Tihanov has made a contribution of prodigious learning, subtle argumentation and lucid exposition. There is a dynamic inside this book, not only in its title: the dialectical contest holds and richly informs our attention.
'... Tihanov has made a contribution of prodigious learning, subtle argumentation and lucid exposition. There is a dynamic inside this book, not only in its title: the dialectical contest holds and richly informs our attention.'Charles Lock, Recherche Litteraire
'Tihanov has produced both the most thoughtful, incisive and erudite book yet to be published on Bakhtin and an excellent and innovative study of Lukacs.'Elizabeth Skomp, SEER, 79, 2, 2001
Tihanov has produced both the most thoughtful, incisive and erudite book yet to be published on Bakhtin and an excellent and innovative study of Lukács ... In one fell swoop Tihanov has given us a brilliant analysis of cultural argument in the interwar period and set a new standard for the study of Bakhtin's work in particular.
Tihanov's annotations (scrupulously accurate and accessible in Oxford's handsome format) are a gold mine for Bakhtin and Lukács scholars alike
'... Tihanov has made a contribution of prodigious learning, subtle argumentation and lucid exposition. There is a dynamic inside this book, not only in its title: the dialectical contest holds and richly informs our attention.'Charles Lock, Recherche Littéraire'Tihanov expresses abstract ideas clearly, and exhibits an impressive knowledge of the published and archival sources, German philosophy and the Russian intellectual context. His study is closely and incisively argued, densely packed with ideas, arresting points and challenging arguments. ... It should stimulate lively debate for a long time to come. One can hardly ask more of an academic study.'Journal of European Studies, XXXI (2001)'covers so much important intellectual territory'Journal of European Studies, XXXI (2001)'This is a brilliant comparative study of the ideas of G. Lukacs and M. Bakhtin.'Journal of European Studies, XXXI (2001)'Tihanov has produced both the most thoughtful, incisive and erudite book yet to be published on Bakhtin and an excellent and innovative study of Lukacs.'Elizabeth Skomp, SEER, 79, 2, 2001'Galin Tihanov has written a splendidly researched and immensely informed intellectual history of two of the twentieth century's major theorists of the novel.'Comparative Literature Studies'this study will, however, undoubtedly be come an unavoidable reference point'Simon Dentith, TLS'the strength of the book ... is in Tihanov's remarkable range of reading, his knowledge of both German and Russian scholarship, and the philosophical backgrounds of the two writers - each steeped in the European academic tradition of the first half of the twentieth century. Both writers emerge transformed when treated in this way.'Simon Dentith, TLS
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This work offers an innovative examination of the intellectual background, affiliations and contexts of two major 20th century thinkers, and a historical interpretation of their work in aesthetics, cultural theory, literary history and philosophy.
Long Description
This book is a comparative study in the history of ideas. It is an innovative examination of the intellectual background, affiliations and contexts of two major twentieth-century thinkers and an historical interpretation of their work in aesthetics, cultural theory, literary history, and philosophy. Unlike all existing texts on Lukacs and Bakhtin, this book offers a comparison of their writings at different stages of their intellectual development and in the broad context of the ideas of their time. The book introduces unknown archival material and discusses hitherto disregarded or overlooked texts by Lukacs and Bakhtin. It puts forward new readings of best-known work on Dostoevsky, Rabelais, and Goethe and treats in an original way the question of the coherence of Bakhtin's ouevre. The book offers valuable insight into the sources of Bakhtin's terminological repertoire and through examination of Bakhtin's and Lukacs's intellectual affiliations - of the limits and substance of their originality as thinkers. Lukacs and Bakhtin emerge from the book as thinkers, whose intellectual careers followed strikingly similar paths. They both were confronted with similar agendas and questions posed for them by their time. Bakhtin however, had to find answers not only for this common agenda but also to the answers that Lukacs himself had already provided.
Main Description
This book is a comparative study in the history of ideas. It is an innovative examination of the intellectual background, affiliations and contexts of two major twentieth-century thinkers and an historical interpretation of their work in aesthetics, cultural theory, literary history, and philosophy. Unlike all existing texts on Lukacs and Bakhtin, this book offers a comparison of their writings at different stages of their intellectual development and in the broad context of the ideas of their time. The book introduces unknown archival material and discusses hitherto disregarded or overlooked texts by Lukacs and Bakhtin. It puts forward new readings of best-known work on Dostoevsky, Rabelais, and Goethe and treats in an original way the question of the coherence of Bakhtin's ouevre . The book offers valuable insight into the sources of Bakhtin's terminological repertoire and through examination of Bakhtin's and Lukacs's intellectual affiliations--of the limits and substance of their originality as thinkers. Lukacs and Bakhtin emerge from the book as thinkers, whose intellectual careers followed strikingly similar paths. They both were confronted with similar agendas and questions posed for them by their time. Bakhtin however, had to find answers not only for this common agenda but also to the answers that Lukacs himself had already provided.
Main Description
This book is a comparative study in the history of ideas. It is an innovative examination of the intellectual background, affiliations and contexts of two major twentieth-century thinkers and an historical interpretation of their work in aesthetics, cultural theory, literary history, and philosophy. Unlike all existing texts on Lukacs and Bakhtin, this book offers a comparison of their writings at different stages of their intellectual development and in the broad context of the ideas of their time. The book introduces unknown archival material and discusses hitherto disregarded or overlooked texts by Lukacs and Bakhtin. It puts forward new readings of best-known work on Dostoevsky, Rabelais, and Goethe and treats in an original way the question of the coherence of Bakhtin'souevre. The book offers valuable insight into the sources of Bakhtin's terminological repertoire and through examination of Bakhtin's and Lukacs's intellectual affiliations--of the limits and substance of their originality as thinkers. Lukacs and Bakhtin emerge from the book as thinkers, whose intellectual careers followed strikingly similar paths. They both were confronted with similar agendas and questions posed for them by their time. Bakhtin however, had to find answers not only for this common agenda but also to the answers that Lukacs himself had already provided.
Main Description
This book is a comparative study in the history of ideas. It is an innovative examination of the intellectual background, affiliations and contexts of two major twentieth-century thinkers and an historical interpretation of their work in aesthetics, cultural theory, literary history, andphilosophy. Unlike all existing texts on Lukacs and Bakhtin, this book offers a comparison of their writings at different stages of their intellectual development and in the broad context of the ideas of their time. The book introduces unknown archival material and discusses hitherto disregarded or overlookedtexts by Lukacs and Bakhtin. It puts forward new readings of best-known work on Dostoevsky, Rabelais, and Goethe and treats in an original way the question of the coherence of Bakhtin's ouevre. The book offers valuable insight into the sources of Bakhtin's terminological repertoire and throughexamination of Bakhtin's and Lukacs's intellectual affiliations - of the limits and substance of their originality as thinkers. Lukacs and Bakhtin emerge from the book as thinkers, whose intellectual careers followed strikingly similar paths. They both were confronted with similar agendas and questions posed for them by their time. Bakhtin however, had to find answers not only for this common agenda but also to the answersthat Lukacs himself had already provided.
Table of Contents
Introduction
Concepts
Culture
Form
Genre
Transfigurations
Reification and Dialogue
Ideology, Language, and Realism
The Novel, the Epic, and Modernity
Heroes
Dostoevsky
Goethe
Hegel and Rabelais
Epilogue Works cited
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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