Catalogue


The Faerie Queene and Middle English romance [electronic resource] : the matter of just memory /
Andrew King.
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Clarendon, 2000.
description
xiv, 246 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
019818722X
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Clarendon, 2000.
isbn
019818722X
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8566740
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [214]-242) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2001-05-01:
Well written and clearly argued, this book will interest not only Spenserians but also students of both medieval verse romance and Thomas Malory. King (Dalhousie Univ., Canada) identifies two key characteristics of Middle English verse romance: a tendency to locate the narrative in a recognizably English landscape and an interest in a related pair of narrative patterns--the exiled or orphaned noble male youth and the virtuous female who is slandered and outcast. He argues that these characteristics reveal an interest in identity in terms of both individual self-identity and regional or national identity. King goes on to claim that Malory was not only directly influenced by this native tradition but that his handling of Continental sources was colored by it. Finally, focusing on books 1, 2, and 5 of The Faerie Queene, King argues that Spenser was as profoundly influenced by Middle English romance as he was by classical and Continental models and that in this he differs markedly fro m Foxe and other Protestant apologists, who did not regard Medieval romance as contributing seriously to a Protestant historiography of England. Recommended for upper-division undergraduates, graduate students, and faculty. B. E. Brandt South Dakota State University
Reviews
Review Quotes
King concludes by encouraging future readings of The Faerie Queene which consider native romance. His book demonstrates the fruitfulness of such investigations and will certainly inspire further scholarship. I can only hope that whoever continues in King's footsteps will do so with the same amount of sophistication, skill and sensitivity
"King's original analyses of Spenser's encounters with native romance yield fresh and intriguing observations. Many may find King's book most valuable as a scholarly source for a new or renewed acquaintance with the long tradition of Middle English romance that forms the foundation of the book.... [The book] demonstrates convincingly Spenser's debt to Middle English romance, revisiting an outpost of Spenser studies and innovatively opening it up for discussion."-Sixteenth Century Journal
"King's original analyses of Spenser's encounters with native romance yield fresh and intriguing observations. Many may find King's book most valuable as a scholarly source for a new or renewed acquaintance with the long tradition of Middle English romance that forms the foundation of the book.... [The book] demonstrates convincingly Spenser's debt to Middle English romance, revisiting an outpost of Spenser studies and innovatively opening it up for discussion."- Sixteenth Century Journal
The book is remarkable for its scope and erudition
We are all in Dr King's debt for this scholarly, ground-breaking book
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, May 2001
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
In this study of the impact of Middle English romance on The Faerie Queene, this text employs the concept of memory, in which Middle English romance writers and Spenser show interest, to build a sense of the complexity of the native romance tradition.
Long Description
Scholarship on Middle English romance has done little to access the textual and bibliographical continuity of this remarkable literary tradition into the sixteenth century and its impact on Elizabethan works. And to an even greater extent Spenserian scholarship has failed to investigate the significant and complex debts which The Faerie Queene owes to medieval native verse romance and Malorys Le Morte Darthur. This book accordingly offers the first comprehensive study of the impact of Middle English romance on The Faerie Queene. It employs the concept of memory, in which both Middle English romance writers and Spenser show specific interest, to build a sense of the thematic, generic, and cultural complexity of the native romance tradition. The memorial character of Middle English romance resides in its intertextuality and its frequent presentation of its narrative events as historical and consequently the basis for a favourable sense of local or even national identity. Spensers memories of native romance involve a more troubled engagement with that tradition of providential national history as well as an endeavour to see in pre-Reformation romance a prophetic and objective authority for Protestant belief.
Main Description
Scholarship on Middle English romance has done little to access the textual and bibliographical continuity of this remarkable literary tradition into the sixteenth century and its impact on Elizabethan works. And to an even greater extent Spenserian scholarship has failed to investigate thesignificant and complex debts which The Faerie Queene owes to medieval native verse romance and Malorys Le Morte Darthur. This book accordingly offers the first comprehensive study of the impact of Middle English romance on The Faerie Queene. It employs the concept of memory, in which both MiddleEnglish romance writers and Spenser show specific interest, to build a sense of the thematic, generic, and cultural complexity of the native romance tradition. The memorial character of Middle English romance resides in its intertextuality and its frequent presentation of its narrative events ashistorical and consequently the basis for a favourable sense of local or even national identity. Spensers memories of native romance involve a more troubled engagement with that tradition of providential national history as well as an endeavour to see in pre-Reformation romance a prophetic andobjective authority for Protestant belief.
Main Description
Scholarship on Middle English romance has done little to access the textual and bibliographical continuity of this remarkable literary tradition into the sixteenth century and its impact on Elizabethan works. And to an even greater extent Spenserian scholarship has failed to investigate the significant and complex debts which The Faerie Queene owes to medieval native verse romance and Malory's Le Morte D'Arthur . This book accordingly offers the first comprehensive study of the impact of Middle English romance on The Faerie Queene . It employs the concept of memory, in which both Middle English romance writers and Spenser show specific interest, to build a sense of the thematic, generic, and cultural complexity of the native romance tradition. The memorial character of Middle English romance resides in its intertextuality and its frequent presentation of its narrative events as historical and consequently the basis for a favourable sense of local or even national identity. Spensers memories of native romance involve a more troubled engagement with that tradition of providential national history as well as an endeavour to see in pre-Reformation romance a prophetic and objective authority for Protestant belief.
Table of Contents
Approaching Spenser's Medievalism
Middle English Romance: Tradition, Genre, Manuscripts, and Prints
The Matter of Just Memory: Providential History in Middle English Romance
Displaced Youths and Slandered Ladies in Middle English Romance
Malory's Le Morte Darthur: Remembering Native Romance
The 'Reformation' of Native Romance in The Faerie Queene, Book I
'It seemed another worlde to beholde': Native Romance, History, and Book II of The Faerie Queene
'The world runne quite out of square': Remembering/Dismembering Native Romance in Book V
Conclusion
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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