Catalogue


Ellis Island to Ebbets Field [electronic resource] : sport and the American Jewish experience /
Peter Levine.
edition
1st Oxford University Press pbk.
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, 1993, c1992.
description
xii, 328 p. : ill.
ISBN
0195085558 (pbk.)
format(s)
Book
More Details
added author
imprint
New York : Oxford University Press, 1993, c1992.
isbn
0195085558 (pbk.)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8566530
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 286-318) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 1992-07-27:
Levine, a professor of history at Michigan State, here composes a valuable footnote to American sports history. He begins by pointing out that Eastern European Jews traditionally honored scholarship and learning over athletic prowess; in his apt phrase, they were ``people of the book rather than people of the hook, right cross, or home run.'' Arrived in America, the immigrant generation found their sons enchanted by sports, to the shock of most and the horror of some. By the 1920s, city-dwelling Jewish athletes had all but taken over the urban game of basketball, and they soon made their mark in boxing with long-time champion Benny Leonard. Stardom in baseball came later, but Hank Greenberg, the quintessential Jewish sports hero, made it all worthwhile in the 1930s. A chapter on Jews in intercollegiate sports between the world wars and other minor concerns seems unnecessary, but taken as a whole this book makes a major contribution to the field. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Appeared in Library Journal on 1992-08:
Sport has played an integral role in American Jewish identity. Levine examines three generations of 20th-century American Jewish life through numerous interviews and studies of Jews in both amateur and professional baseball, basketball, and boxing. The heart of the book concerns the second generation and the interwar era of the Twenties and Thirties. Ironies abound. Jews used sports to strengthen ethnic pride; sports also eased assimilation into American culture. Jewish sports stars like the muscular Hank Greenberg were not often ritually observant Jews, but they were nevertheless a point of great pride. This book also tries to challenge the myth of the physically inept Jew. Levine was inspired to write this study by the memory of his father, a college athlete at the City College of New York. This unusual and scholarly work will definitely fill a niche in libraries with strong Judaic and sports holdings.-- Paul Kaplan, Dakota Cty. Lib., Eagan, Minn. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A fine study."--Dr. Linda J. Borish, Western Michigan University
"An engaging glimpse into an aspect of Jewish culture often overlooked and ignored. A home run."--Gary David Goldberg, creator of TV's Brooklyn Bridge
"A scholarly exploration of the important role sport played in transforming Jewish immigrants into American Jews."--The Sporting News
"A valuable footnote to American sports history....Makes a major contribution to the field."--Publishers Weekly
"Ellis Island to Ebbets Field is a wonderfully evocative combination of sports and Jewish cultural and athletic life in our country. It tells the stories of Hank Greenberg, Nat Holman, Barney Ross, and many other famous and not so famous Jewish athletes with great insight and appeal."--W.P.Kinsella, author of Shoeless Joe
"For too long we have focused our historical attention on the political scene--wars and presidents etc. Peter Levine reminds us that sometimes our most revealing history comes from different arenas and playing fields."--Ken Burns, Filmmaker
"Levine convincingly and repeatedly demonstrates the way in whch sport served as an important vehicle of assimilation and, perhaps more important, provided a vivid demonstration of Jewish strength, fortitutde, determination, and heroism in the face of anti-Semitic calumny at home and impendinggenocide abroad. Levine's social history of Jews and American sports weaves together this special perspective with bittersweet tales of achievement and overcoming."--American Jewish Archives
"Levine tells an important but little-known story."--Elliott J. Gorn, Miami University
"This is history at its best. Ellis Island to Ebbets Field offers much to appreciate and to savor."--Richard C. Crepeau, University of Central Florida
"Levine convincingly and repeatedly demonstrates the way in whch sport served as an important vehicle of assimilation and, perhaps more important, provided a vivid demonstration of Jewish strength, fortitutde, determination, and heroism in the face of anti-Semitic calumny at home and impending genocide abroad. Levine's social history of Jews and American sports weaves together this special perspective with bittersweet tales of achievement andovercoming."--American Jewish Archives"A scholarly exploration of the important role sport played in transforming Jewish immigrants into American Jews."--The Sporting News"A valuable footnote to American sports history....Makes a major contribution to the field."--Publishers Weekly"Ellis Island to Ebbets Field is a wonderfully evocative combination of sports and Jewish cultural and athletic life in our country. It tells the stories of Hank Greenberg, Nat Holman, Barney Ross, and many other famous and not so famous Jewish athletes with great insight and appeal."--W.P. Kinsella, author of Shoeless Joe"Levine tells an important but little-known story."--Elliott J. Gorn, Miami University"An engaging glimpse into an aspect of Jewish culture often overlooked and ignored. A home run."--Gary David Goldberg, creator of TV's Brooklyn Bridge"For too long we have focused our historical attention on the political scene--wars and presidents etc. Peter Levine reminds us that sometimes our most revealing history comes from different arenas and playing fields."--Ken Burns, Filmmaker"A fine study."--Dr. Linda J. Borish, Western Michigan University"This is history at its best. Ellis Island to Ebbets Field offers much to appreciate and to savor."--Richard C. Crepeau, University of Central Florida
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Summaries
Long Description
An exploration into the experience of Jewish immigrants in America in the first half of the twentieth century. Asks the question: What part did sport play in the process by which these people became Americans? It is based on the experience of other imigrant groups and minority people especially the rich culture of everyday life created by East European Jewish imigrants, particularly their children.
Main Description
Filled with marvelous stories, anecdotes and personality profiles, this book explores the importance of sport--both watching and playing--as a middle ground for a minority culture actively determining for itself what it meant to be an American Jew. Photos.
Main Description
In Ellis Island to Ebbets Field, Peter Levine vividly recounts the stories of Red Auerbach, Hank Greenberg, Moe Berg, Sid Luckman, Nat Holman, Benny Leonard, Barney Ross, Marty Glickman, and a host of others who became Jewish heroes and symbols of the difficult struggle for American success.From settlement houses and street corners, to Madison Square and Fenway Park, their experiences recall a time when Jewish males dominated sports like boxing and basketball, helping to smash stereotypes about Jewish weakness while instilling American Jews with a fierce pride in their strength andability in the face of Nazi aggression, domestic anti-Semitism, and economic depression. Full of marvelous stories, anecdotes, and personalities, Ellis Island to Ebbets Field enhances our understanding of the Jewish-American experience as well as the struggles of other American minoritygroups.
Table of Contents
Introductionp. 3
The Promise of Sportp. 11
Basketball and Communityp. 26
Jews and Professional Basketball, 1900-1950p. 52
"Allagaroo, Garoo, Gara": The College Game, CCNY, and the Scandals of 1950p. 74
America's National Gamep. 87
Cohen at the Batp. 100
"Mantle, Schmantle, We Got Abie": Jews and Major League Baseball Between the Warsp. 117
"Oy Such a Fighter!": Boxing and the American Jewish Experiencep. 144
"Fighting for All My People": Jewish Champions and American Heroesp. 170
"Der Yiddisher Vildkat" and the "Hebrew Hillbilly": College Life and College Sport Between the Warsp. 190
"My Father and I, We Didn't Get Our Medals": Marty Glickman's American Jewish Odysseyp. 216
"Where Have You Gone, Hank Greenberg?": Sport and the American Jewish Experience Since World War IIp. 235
Conclusionsp. 270
Postscript: The Jewish Experience in Comparative Perspectivep. 281
Bibliographic Notep. 286
Notesp. 291
Indexp. 319
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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