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Civil histories [electronic resource] : essays presented to Sir Keith Thomas /
edited by Peter Burke, Brian Harrison, and Paul Slack.
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2000.
description
xiii, 399 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0198207107 (acid-free paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2000.
isbn
0198207107 (acid-free paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8566014
 
"The published writings of Keith Thomas, 1957-1998": p. [359]-377.
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
An outstanding collection
'Peter Burke, Brian Harrison and Paul Slack have achieved the rare feat of persuading the contributors to address a particular theme: that of "civility". It is an appropriate theme, not only with regard to Thomas's scholarly interests, but also in relation to the man himself.'Keith Wrightson, TLS
'Peter Burke, Brian Harrison and Paul Slack have achieved the rare feat ofpersuading the contributors to address a particular theme: that of "civility".It is an appropriate theme, not only with regard to Thomas's scholarlyinterests, but also in relation to the man himself.'Keith Wrightson, TLS
'Splendid volume'William Lamont, English Historical Review
1. The Editors: Keith Thomas 2. Peter Burke: A Civil Tongue: Language and Politeness in Early Modern Europe 3. Euan Cameron: Civilized Religion from Renaissance to Reformation and Counter-Reformation 4. Ralph Houlbrooke: Civility and Civil Observances in the Early Modern English Funeral 5. Martin Ingram: Sexual Manners: The Other Face of Civility in Early Modern England 6. Sara Mendelson: The Civility of Women in Seventeenth-Century England 7. Mark S R Jenner: Civilization and Deodorization? Smell in Early Modern English Culture 8. Alan Macfarlane: Civility and the Decline of Magic 9. Paul Slack: Perceptions of the Metropolis in Seventeenth-Century England 10. Jonathan Barry: Civility and Civic Culture in Early Modern England: The Meanings of Urban Freedom 11. Bernard Capp: Arson, Threats of Arson, and Incivility in Early Modern England 12. J A Sharpe: Civility, Civilizing Processes, and the End of Public Punishment in England 13. Robin Briggs: From the German Forests to Civil Society: The Frankish Myth and the Ancient Constitution in France 14. Ian Bostridge: Music, Reason, and Politeness: Magic and Witchcraft in the Career of George Fredric Handel 15. Prys Morgan: Wild Wales: Civilizing the Welsh from the Sixteenth to the Nineteenth Centuries 16. Leslie Hannah: The Moral Economy of Business: A Historical Perspective on Ethics and Efficiency 17. Paul Johnson: Civilizing Mammon: Laws, Morals, and the City in Nineteenth-Century England 18. John Darwin: Civility and Empire 19. Brian Harrison: The Public and the Private in Modern Britain 20. Giles Mandelbrote: The Published Writings of Keith Thomas, 1957-1998
'Splendid volume'William Lamont, English Historical Review'Peter Burke, Brian Harrison and Paul Slack have achieved the rare feat of persuading the contributors to address a particular theme: that of "civility". It is an appropriate theme, not only with regard to Thomas's scholarly interests, but also in relation to the man himself.'Keith Wrightson, TLS
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Summaries
Long Description
Sir Keith Thomas is one of the most innovative and influential of English historians, and a scholar of unusual range. These essays, presented to him on his retirement as President of Corpus Christi College, Oxford, concentrate on one of the broad themes illuminated by his work - changing notions of civility in the past. From the sixteenth century onwards, civility was a term applied to modes of behaviour as well as to cultural and civic attributes. Its influence extended from styles of language and sexual mores to funeral ceremonies and commercial morality. It was used to distinguish the civil from the barbarous and the English from the Irish and Welsh, and to banish superstition and justify imperialism. The contributors - distinguished historians who have been Keith Thomas's pupils - illustrate the many implications of civility in the early modern period and its shifts of meaning down to the twentieth century.
Long Description
This volume is a tribute to Sir Keith Thomas, one of Britain's greatest living historians, by distinguished scholars who have been his students. They describe the changing meanings of civility and civil manners since the sixteenth century, showing how the terms were used with respect to different people--women, the English and Welsh, imperialists, businessmen--and their effects in fields as varied as sexual relations, religion, urban politics, and private life.
Main Description
'Peter Burke, Brian Harrison and Paul Slack have achieved the rare feat of persuading the contributors to address a particular theme: that of 'civility'. It is an appropriate theme, not only with regard to Thomas's scholarly interests, but also in relation to the man himself' -Keith Wrightson, Times Literary Supplement'An outstanding collection' -HistoryThis volume is a tribute to one of England's greatest living historians, Sir Keith Thomas, by distinguished scholars who have been his pupils. They describe the changing meanings of civility and civil manners since the sixteenth century. They show how the terms were used with respect to different people - women, the English and the Welsh, imperialists, and businessmen - and their effects in fields as varied as sexual relations, religion, urban politics, and private life.
Main Description
Sir Keith Thomas is one of the most innovative and influential of English historians, and a scholar of unusual range. These essays, presented to him on his retirement as President of Corpus Christi College, Oxford, concentrate on one of the broad themes illuminated by his work - changingnotions of civility in the past. From the sixteenth century onwards, civility was a term applied to modes of behaviour as well as to cultural and civic attributes. Its influence extended from styles of language and sexual mores to funeral ceremonies and commercial morality. It was used todistinguish the civil from the barbarous and the English from the Irish and Welsh, and to banish superstition and justify imperialism. The contributors - distinguished historians who have been Keith Thomas's pupils - illustrate the many implications of civility in the early modern period and itsshifts of meaning down to the twentieth century.
Table of Contents
The Editors
A Civil Tongue: Language and Politeness in Early Modern Europe
Civilized Religion from Renaissance to Reformation and Counter-Reformation
Civility and Civil Observances in the Early Modern English Funeral
Sexual Manners: The Other Face of Civility in Early Modern England
The Civility of Women in Seventeenth-Century England
Civilization and Deodorization? Smell in Early Modern English Culture
Civility and the Decline of Magic
Perceptions of the Metropolis in Seventeenth-Century England
Civility and Civic Culture in Early Modern England: The Meanings of Urban Freedom
Arson, Threats of Arson, and Incivility in Early Modern England
Civility, Civilizing Processes, and the End of Public Punishment in England
From the German Forests to Civil Society: The Frankish Myth and the Ancient Constitution in France
Music, Reason, and Politeness: Magic and Witchcraft in the Career of George Fredric Handel
Wild Wales: Civilizing the Welsh from the Sixteenth to the Nineteenth Centuries
The Moral Economy of Business: A Historical Perspective on Ethics and Efficiency
Civilizing Mammon: Laws, Morals, and the City in Nineteenth-Century England
Civility and Empire
The Public and the Private in Modern Britain
The Published Writings of Keith Thomas, 1957-1998
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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