Catalogue

COVID-19: Updates on library services and operations.

Beyond deconstruction [electronic resource] : the uses and abuses of literary theory /
Howard Felperin.
imprint
Oxford : Clarendon Press ; New York : Oxford University Press, 1986
description
226 p. ; 22 cm.
ISBN
0198128967 (pbk.) :
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Oxford : Clarendon Press ; New York : Oxford University Press, 1986
isbn
0198128967 (pbk.) :
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8565779
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 1986-04:
Over the past two decades, literary theory has grown enormously, and its relationship to literary criticism has changed rapidly. Felperin wants to survey the new theories, to provide ``a synoptic history of literary study,'' to argue for the importance of some achievements and the failure of others. He undertakes to guide his readers across a theoretical terrain narrower than the one covered in Terry Eagleton's Literary Theory: An Introduction (CH, Feb '84), but it is not the reduced scope that causes the problems. Whereas Eagleton openly displays his numerous prejudices, Felperin only sporadically acknowledges his (e.g., on p. 23 he makes a disarming disclaimer about the impossibility of being wholly disinterested). But it would be difficult for an unsophisticated student to know just when the disclaimer applies in this subtly yet persistently partisan text, which is ever ready to imply that it is other theorists who are partisan, programmatic, or ideological. The lack of neutrality is sometimes revealed in the choice of a single word, as when Felperin calls Jonathan Culler an ``evangelist'' of structuralism rather than an interpreter or advocate; at other times, it requires careful reading of prolonged commentary (as in the pages devoted to Louis Althusser). As a result, the long chapters on ``Leavisism,'' Marxism, and structuralism are not dependable, but those devoted to deconstruction and poststructuralist practice are much better. Because this book could mislead anyone not already well informed in critical theory, it is recommended only to the larger undergraduate and graduate libraries.-K. Tololyan, Wesleyan University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"In a series of brief essays on the reaction to the new criticism, Marxism, structuralism, and deconstruction--which are valuable as a sketch of the recent history of theory--[Felperin] sharply defines the limits of current interpretive methods."--Virginia Quarterly Review
"In a series of brief essays on the reaction to the new criticism, Marxism, structuralism, and deconstruction--which are valuable as a sketch of the recent history of theory--[Felperin] sharply defines the limits of current interpretive methods."-- Virginia Quarterly Review
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
The past two decades have seen swift and radical change in the way literature is perceived and taught in this country and abroad, as numerous new schools of theory have blossomed, particularly at Yale, Johns Hopkins, and Cambridge. Intended as an introduction to these new theories, Beyond Deconstruction offers a balanced and lively overview that steers clear of technicalities as it explains, explores, and occasionally takes issue with the large movements that have followed the so-called "practical" criticism of F.R. Leavis and others. Felperin focuses on the major schools and figures of structuralism, Marxism, and deconstruction, providing readers with a clear grasp of the ideological and methodological issues involved. In its responsiveness to developments on both sides of the Atlantic and to relations and differences between them, Beyond Deconstruction provides a comprehensive and incisive introduction to the field.
Main Description
The past two decades have seen swift and radical change in the way literature is perceived and taught in this country and abroad, as numerous new schools of theory have blossomed, particularly at Yale, Johns Hopkins, and Cambridge. Intended as an introduction to these new theories, BeyondDeconstruction offers a balanced and lively overview that steers clear of technicalities as it explains, explores, and occasionally takes issue with the large movements that have followed the so-called "practical" criticism of F.R. Leavis and others. Felperin focuses on the major schools and figuresof structuralism, Marxism, and deconstruction, providing readers with a clear grasp of the ideological and methodological issues involved. In its responsiveness to developments on both sides of the Atlantic and to relations and differences between them, Beyond Deconstruction provides acomprehensive and incisive introduction to the field.
Main Description
This book offers an account of the swiftly developing discipline of contemporary literary theory, and of its consequences for future literary study.
Unpaid Annotation
Offers an account of the swiftly developing discipline of contemporary literary theory, and of its consequences for future literary study. It is not aimed at promoting the claims of any of the theoretical schools it takes up. Still less does it pretend to advance some new theory that would move us definitively into or beyond post-structuralism.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem