Catalogue


Wonder in Shakespeare [electronic resource] /
Adam Max Cohen.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2012.
description
x, 226 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0230105416, 9780230105416
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2012.
isbn
0230105416
9780230105416
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Wonder, amazement, and surprise : beginning a stunning story -- Resurrections of the living and the dead : natural and spiritual bodies and souls -- "Die to live" : various forms of empathetic wonder -- The metaphorical use of the prodigious birth tradition -- More of a prodigy than a prophecy -- Wonder, awe, and admiration : Shakespeare's cabinets of curiosity -- Transalpine wonders : Shakespeare's marvelous aesthetics.
catalogue key
8553890
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [215]-216) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2012-08-01:
Cohen's treatment of wonder in Shakespeare's plays is broader than T. G. Bishop's (Shakespeare and the Theatre of Wonder, 1996) and Peter Platt's (Reason Diminished: Shakespeare and the Marvelous, 1997), both of which focus largely on the late romances. Cohen especially sees wonder in the theater as replacing the miraculous that Queen Elizabeth had removed from the church as treasonous in her effort to supplant the older Catholic tradition and worship in England with Protestantism, which claimed that the age of miracles was past. Shakespeare could apparently bring Hermione (The Winter's Tale) back from the dead, but he could not openly discuss the Resurrection of Christ in the theater. Cohen begins with Miranda and her wonder at seeing men; continues with pseudo-resurrections such as that of Hero; discusses prodigious births such as Glendower's; and relates all to Italian theories of wonder current in Shakespeare's day. Appended are six essays by Shakespearean scholars responding to and expanding on Cohen's study: e.g., Rebecca Steinberger discusses the transformation of Richard II from poor king to sympathetic victim, and Joshua Fisher demonstrates how Iago turns the normal into the strange in manipulating Othello. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. M. S. Stephenson University of Texas at Brownsville
Reviews
Review Quotes
'The final work in a too brief career, Adam Max Cohen's Wonder in Shakespeare is a kind of seminar on Shakespeare's multiple senses of 'wonder': prodigies, resurrections, and Mirandathings that should be looked at, including that young castaway in The Tempest. This is also a book about limitsthe limits of language and the senses and how Shakespeare's plays capture and reflect that precious aspect of human experience." - William Germano, Cooper Union "Recommended."CHOICE
'The final work in a too brief career, Adam Max Cohen'sWonder in Shakespeareis a kind of seminar on Shakespeare's multiple senses of 'wonder': prodigies, resurrections, and Mirandathings that should be looked at, including that young castaway in The Tempest. This is also a book about limitsthe limits of language and the senses and how Shakespeare's plays capture and reflect that precious aspect of human experience." - William Germano, Cooper Union
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, August 2012
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Description for Bookstore
Exploration of the use of the word 'wonder' in Shakespeare's work
Main Description
Wonder is a highly ambivalent word and idea which can denote woe, horror, or terror on one hand and delight, jubilation, or ecstasy on the other. In the first part of this book, Adam Max Cohen embraces the many meanings of wonder in order to challenge the generic divides between comedy, tragedy, history, and romance to suggest that Shakespeare's primary goal in crafting each of his play worlds was the evocation of one or more varieties of wonder. In the second part of this book, seven esteemed scholars respond to Cohen's exploration and pay homage to his legacy.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Adam Max Cohen embraces the many meanings of wonder in order to challenge the generic divides between comedy, tragedy, history and romance and suggests that Shakespeare's primary goal in crafting each of his playworlds was the evocation of one or more varieties of wonder.

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