Catalogue

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Women, dissent and anti-slavery in Britain and America, 1790-1865 [electronic resource] /
edited by Elizabeth J. Clapp and Julie Roy Jeffrey.
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2011.
description
x, 214 p. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0199585482, 9780199585489
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2011.
isbn
0199585482
9780199585489
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8553868
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [197]-207) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"[A] useful collection of eight essays [that]...provide important information and raise new questions. Taken as a whole, the volume offers concrete proof of the importance of further explorations of Puritan and Protestant dissent in Anglo-American female antislavery efforts." --TheEighteenth-Century Intelligencer
makes a major contribution to both anti-slavery and womens studies
This is an enjoyable and authoritative book ... It is therefore recommended to anyone who wishes to explore the role of religious women and religious cultures in the anti-slavery campaigns of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, and makes an effective contribution.
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
As historians have gradually come to recognize, the involvement of women was central to the anti-slavery cause in both Britain and the United States. Like their male counterparts, women abolitionists did not all speak with one voice. Among the major differences between women were their religious affiliations, an aspect of their commitment that has not been studied in detail. Yet it is clear that the desire to live out and practice their religious beliefs inspired many of the womenwho participated in anti-slavery activities in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. This book examines the part that the traditions, practices, and beliefs of English Protestant dissent and the American Puritan and evangelical traditions played in women's anti-slavery activism. Focusing particularly on Baptist, Congregational, Presbyterian and Unitarian women, the essays in this volume move from accounts of individual women's participation in the movement as printers and writers, to assessments of the negotiations and the occasional conflicts between different denominationalgroups and their anti-slavery impulses. Together the essays in this volume explore how the tradition of English Protestant Dissent shaped the American abolitionist movement, and the various ways in which women belonging to the different denominations on both sides of the Atlantic drew on theirreligious beliefs to influence the direction of their anti-slavery movements. The collection provides a nuanced understanding of why these women felt compelled to fight for the end of slavery in their respective countries.
Main Description
As historians have gradually come to recognize, the involvement of women was central to the anti-slavery cause in both Britain and the United States. Like their male counterparts, women abolitionists did not all speak with one voice. Among the major differences between women were their religious affiliations, an aspect of their commitment that has not been studied in detail. Yet it is clear that the desire to live out and practice their religious beliefs inspired many of the women who participated in anti-slavery activities in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. This book examines the part that the traditions, practices, and beliefs of English Protestant dissent and the American Puritan and evangelical traditions played in women's anti-slavery activism. Focusing particularly on Baptist, Congregational, Presbyterian and Unitarian women, the essays in this volume move from accounts of individual women's participation in the movement as printers and writers, to assessments of the negotiations and the occasional conflicts between different denominational groups and their anti-slavery impulses. Together the essays in this volume explore how the tradition of English Protestant Dissent shaped the American abolitionist movement, and the various ways in which women belonging to the different denominations on both sides of the Atlantic drew on their religious beliefs to influence the direction of their anti-slavery movements. The collection provides a nuanced understanding of why these women felt compelled to fight for the end of slavery in their respective countries.
Main Description
As historians have gradually come to recognize, the involvement of women was central to the anti-slavery cause in both Britain and the United States. Like their male counterparts, women abolitionists did not all speak with one voice. Among the major differences between women were theirreligious affiliations, an aspect of their commitment that has not been studied in detail. Yet it is clear that the desire to live out and practice their religious beliefs inspired many of the women who participated in anti-slavery activities in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. This book examines the part that the traditions, practices, and beliefs of English Protestant dissent and the American Puritan and evangelical traditions played in women's anti-slavery activism. Focusing particularly on Baptist, Congregational, Presbyterian and Unitarian women, the essays in thisvolume move from accounts of individual women's participation in the movement as printers and writers, to assessments of the negotiations and the occasional conflicts between different denominational groups and their anti-slavery impulses. Together the essays in this volume explore how the traditionof English Protestant Dissent shaped the American abolitionist movement, and the various ways in which women belonging to the different denominations on both sides of the Atlantic drew on their religious beliefs to influence the direction of their anti-slavery movements. The collection provides anuanced understanding of why these women felt compelled to fight for the end of slavery in their respective countries.
Table of Contents
Forewordp. v
List of Contributorsp. ix
Introductionp. 1
Complicating the Story: Religion and Gender in Historical Writing on British and American Anti-Slaveryp. 20
Martha Gurney and the Anti-Slave Trade Movement, 1788-94p. 44
'We Ought to Obey God rather than Man': Women, Anti-Slavery, and Nonconformist Religious Culturesp. 66
The Dissenting Voice of Elizabeth Heyrick: An Exploration of the Links Between Gender, Religious Dissent, and Anti-Slavery Radicalismp. 88
Immediatism, Dissent, and Gender: Women and the Sentimentalization of Transatlantic Anti-Slavery Appealsp. 111
Women Abolitionists and the Dissenting Traditionp. 132
'On the Side of Righteousness': Women, the Church, and Abolitionp. 155
Writing Against Slavery: Harriet Beecher Stowep. 175
Bibliographyp. 197
Indexp. 209
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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