Catalogue

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Whose God rules? [electronic resource] : is the United States a secular nation or a theolegal democracy? /
edited by Nathan C. Walker and Edwin J. Greenlee ; foreword by Tony Blair.
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2011.
description
xii, 263 p. ; 22 cm.
ISBN
9780230117839 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2011.
isbn
9780230117839 (hardback)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Machine generated contents note: -- Foreword--Tony Blair * Introduction to the Theolegal Theory--Nathan C. Walker * Part I: A Theolegal Nation * Editorial Preface to Unit I * Theolegal Discourse--Kent Greenawalt * Religious Fairness--Martha Nussbaum * Religious Secularism--Paula M. Cooey * Part II: Theolegal Officials * Editorial Preface to Unit II * The Religious Right--Alan Dershowitz * Religious Judges--Edwin J. Greenlee * Religious Presidents--Mark J. Rozell * Presidential Abortion Rhetoric--Ted G. Jelen and Brendan Morris * Part III: Theolegal Democracy * Editorial Preface to Unit III * Stem Cell Research--Robert P. George * Evolution v. Creation--Michael Zimmerman * Marriage Equality--Stacey Sobel and Edwin J. Greenlee * Theolegal Marriage--Christine Carlson * Part IV: Theodiplomacy * Editorial Preface to Unit IV * Theotorture of Guantánamo--David L. McColgin * Theolegal Nuclear Weapons Policy--Douglas B. Shaw * Theology of Human Rights--William F. Schultz * Religious Freedom--Joseph K. Grieboski * Conclusion--Edwin J. Greenlee and Nathan C. Walker.
abstract
"The United States is not a secular democracy where laws guarantee freedom from religion, nor is it a theocracy, where a single religion prescribes all laws. This book demonstrates that the United States, whether we like it or not, is a theolegal nation--a democracy that simultaneously guarantees citizens the right to free expression of belief while preventing the establishment of a state religion. This guarantees officials the right to use theology as one of many resources in making, applying, or administering law because a theolegal democracy does not prevent citizens or officials from using their religious worldview in the public arena as seen in secular nations. However, theolegal democracy also does not permit officials to use their theology to deny civil rights to those who do not meet those creedal tests as seen in theocracies"--
"Theolegal democracy defines a political system that allows public officials to use theology in its democratic process to shape law without instituting an official state religion. In Whose God Rules?, preeminent scholars debate the theolegal theory, which describes the gray area between a secular legal system, where theology is dismissed as irrational and a threat to the separation of religion and state, and a theocracy, where a single religion determines all law. The United States is neither a secular nation nor a theocracy, leading scholars to ask whether the United States is a theolegal democracy. If so, whose God rules?"--
catalogue key
8553774
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Nathan C. Walker is the minister of the First Unitarian Church of Philadelphia and a doctoral candidate in Law, Education and Religion at Columbia University. Edwin J. Greenlee is associate director for Public Services in the Biddle Law Library of the University of Pennsylvania's School of Law.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"This book is a provocative and pioneering effort to rethink the complex relation of religion and the state in the American past and present. Don't miss it!" - Cornel West, Princeton University "Whose God Rules? offers an illuminating new frame to revitalize the stale debate over church-state separation. Bringing a thoughtful and diverse group of experts to the table, Walker and Greenlee present a feast for the intellect that challenges us all to become better citizens." - Forrest Church, author of So Help Me God: the Founding Fathers and The First Great Battle over Church and State "This erudite book offers a rare and unusual combination; it includes a broad range of topics treated in depth by a diverse group of contributors who write about a distinctive and controversial concept, namely theolegal democracy. It is sure to provoke an interesting and renewed debate about the relationship of religion and politics." - Leslie Griffin, University of Houston Law Center and author of Law and Religion: Cases and Materials
"This book is a provocative and pioneering effort to rethink the complex relation of religion and the state in the American past and present. Don't miss it!"--Cornel West, Princeton University "Whose God Rules? offers an illuminating new frame to revitalize the stale debate over church-state separation. Bringing a thoughtful and diverse group of experts to the table, Walker and Greenlee present a feast for the intellect that challenges us all to become better citizens."--Forrest Church, author of So Help Me God: the Founding Fathers and The First Great Battle over Church and State "This erudite book offers a rare and unusual combination; it includes a broad range of topics treated in depth by a diverse group of contributors who write about a distinctive and controversial concept, namely theolegal democracy. It is sure to provoke an interesting and renewed debate about the relationship of religion and politics."--Leslie Griffin, University of Houston Law Center and author of Law and Religion: Cases and Materials
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Description for Bookstore
This book demonstrates that the United States, whether we like it or not, is a theolegal nation
Long Description
The United States is not a secular democracy where laws guarantee freedom from religion, nor is it a theocracy, where a single religion prescribes all laws. This book demonstrates that the United States, whether we like it or not, is a theolegal nation - a democracy that simultaneously guarantees citizens the right to free expression of belief while preventing the establishment of a state religion. This guarantees officials the right to use theology as one of many resources in making, applying, or administering law because a theolegal democracy does not prevent citizens or officials from using their religious worldview in the public arena as seen in secular nations. However, theolegal democracy also does not permit officials to use their theology to deny civil rights to those who do not meet those creedal tests as seen in theocracies.
Library of Congress Summary
"The United States is not a secular democracy where laws guarantee freedom from religion, nor is it a theocracy, where a single religion prescribes all laws. This book demonstrates that the United States, whether we like it or not, is a theolegal nation--a democracy that simultaneously guarantees citizens the right to free expression of belief while preventing the establishment of a state religion. This guarantees officials the right to use theology as one of many resources in making, applying, or administering law because a theolegal democracy does not prevent citizens or officials from using their religious worldview in the public arena as seen in secular nations. However, theolegal democracy also does not permit officials to use their theology to deny civil rights to those who do not meet those creedal tests as seen in theocracies"--"Theolegal democracy defines a political system that allows public officials to use theology in its democratic process to shape law without instituting an official state religion. In Whose God Rules?, preeminent scholars debate the theolegal theory, which describes the gray area between a secular legal system, where theology is dismissed as irrational and a threat to the separation of religion and state, and a theocracy, where a single religion determines all law. The United States is neither a secular nation nor a theocracy, leading scholars to ask whether the United States is a theolegal democracy. If so, whose God rules?"--
Main Description
Theolegal democracy defines a political system that allows public officials to use theology in its democratic process to shape law without instituting an official state religion. In Whose God Rules?, preeminent scholars debate the theolegal theory, which describes the gray area between a secular legal system, where theology is dismissed as irrational and a threat to the separation of religion and state, and a theocracy, where a single religion determines all law. The United States is neither a secular nation nor a theocracy, leading scholars to ask whether the United States is a theolegal democracy. If so, whose God rules?
Main Description
The United States is not a secular democracy where laws guarantee freedom from religion, nor is it a theocracy, where a single religion prescribes all laws. This book demonstrates that the United States, whether we like it or not, is a theolegal nation--a democracy that simultaneously guarantees citizens the right to free expression of belief while preventing the establishment of a state religion. This guarantees officials the right to use theology as one of many resources in making, applying, or administering law because a theolegal democracy does not prevent citizens or officials from using their religious worldview in the public arena as seen in secular nations. However, theolegal democracy also does not permit officials to use their theology to deny civil rights to those who do not meet those creedal tests as seen in theocracies.
Table of Contents
Forewordp. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xiii
Introduction to Theolegal Theoryp. 1
A Theolegal Nationp. 19
Editorial Prefacep. 21
Religious Premises in Politics and Lawp. 23
Religious Fairnessp. 43
Religious Secularismp. 61
Theolegal Officialsp. 79
Editorial Prefacep. 81
The Religious Rightp. 83
Religious Judgesp. 97
Religious Presidentsp. 107
Presidential Abortion Rhetoric and Religionp. 123
Theolegal Democracyp. 137
Editorial Prefacep. 139
Stem Cell Researchp. 141
Evolution v. Creationp. 159
Marriage Equalityp. 171
Theolegal Marriagep. 183
Theodiplomacyp. 193
Editorial Prefacep. 195
The Theotorture of Guantánamop. 197
Theolegal Nuclear Weapons Policyp. 211
Theology and Human Rightsp. 227
Religious Freedomp. 239
Conclusionp. 247
Contributorsp. 251
Indexp. 257
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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