Catalogue


The U.S.-Japan security alliance [electronic resource] : regional multilateralism /
edited by Takashi Inoguchi, G. John Ikenberry, and Yoichiro Sato.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2011.
description
vi, 314 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0230110843 (alk. paper), 9780230110847 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2011.
isbn
0230110843 (alk. paper)
9780230110847 (alk. paper)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Alliance constrained: Japan, the United States, and regional security -- Costs and benefits of the U.S.-Japan alliance from the Japanese perspective -- Refining the U.S.-Japan strategic bargain -- The merits of alliance: a Japanese perspective. logic underpins Japan's global and regional security role? -- Global costs and benefits of the U.S.-Japan alliance: an American view -- Korea and the Japan-United States alliance: a Japanese perspective -- Korea and the United States-Japan alliance: an American perspective -- Liberal deterrence of China: challenges in achieving Japan's China policy -- The security dilemma in Asian architecture: U.S., Japan, and China -- How Russia matters in Japan-U.S. alliance -- The U.S.-Japan alliance and Russia -- Evolution of the Australia-Japan security partnership: toward a softer triangle alliance with the United States -- The United States, Japan, and Australia: security linkages to Southeast Asia -- The North Atlantic Treaty Organization: new chances for the Japan-U.S. alliance.
catalogue key
8553378
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Takashi Inoguchi is an Emeritus Professor of the University of Tokyo and the President of the University of Niigata Prefecture. He has published widely on Japan and International Affairs including Japanese Politics: An Introduction (2005). He is founding editor of two journals, the Japanese journal of Political Science and International Relations of the Asia-Pacific. G. John Ikenberry is the Albert G. Milbank Professor of Politics and International Affairs at Princeton University in the Department of Politics and the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. He is the author of After Victory: Institutions, Strategic Restraint, and the Rebuilding of Order after Major Wars (2001), which won the 2002 Schroeder-Jervis Award, and the coauthor of The Crisis of American Foreign Policy: Wilsonianism in the Twenty-First Century (2009). Yoichiro Sato is a Professor and Director of International Strategic Studies at Ritsumeikan Asia Pacific University in Beppu, Japan. He taught diplomats and military officers at the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies of the U.S. Department of Defense from 2001 to 2009. His major works include Japan in a Dynamic Asia (2006), Norms, Interests, and Power in Japanese Foreign Policy (2008), and The Rise of China and International Security (2008).
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Although there are several books about the U.S.-Japan security alliance, few look at it equally from the perspective of both countries, or in the broader framework of the alliance's relationships with other important nations in the region. This volume does both. Most welcome too is a particular consideration for how the "alliance dilemma" of Japan's fear of entrapment versus abandonment has played out over time, and how complicated regional and domestic factors are affecting the "ambiguities" that used to help sustain the alliance. This is a very useful book both for its comprehensive overview of the alliance in broader perspective and for its several in-depth case studies of the alliance and other nations in the region." --Ellis S. Krauss, School of International Relations and Pacific Studies, University of California, San Diego
" The US-Japan Security Alliance provides an excellent and up-to-date effort to think through the US-Japan relationship, and how the latter country is to fit into an Asia increasingly dominated by a rising China. The chapters of this book examine the problem from multiple perspectives and suggest pathways to new security architectures in Northeast Asia." --Francis Fukuyama, Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, Stanford University "Although there are several books about the U.S.-Japan security alliance, few look at it equally from the perspective of both countries, or in the broader framework of the alliance's relationships with other important nations in the region. This volume does both. Most welcome too is a particular consideration for how the "alliance dilemma" of Japan's fear of entrapment versus abandonment has played out over time, and how complicated regional and domestic factors are affecting the "ambiguities" that used to help sustain the alliance. This is a very useful book both for its comprehensive overview of the alliance in broader perspective and for its several in-depth case studies of the alliance and other nations in the region."--Ellis S. Krauss, School of International Relations and Pacific Studies, University of California, San Diego 'With political change in Japan, growing fiscal pressures on Washington and Tokyo, and new challenges from China and North Korea, we are primed for another redefinition of the U.S.-Japan alliance. Inoguchi, Ikenberry and Sato help to map the way with this collection of essays from some of the leading thinkers on Asian security and U.S.-Japan relations."--Michael J. Green, Georgetown University and the Center for Strategic and International Studies "The durability of the U.S.-Japan alliance lies in its capacity to constantly redefine itself to adapt to the ever-changing security equation in Asia and beyond. This volume is amongst the first and no doubt the most far-reaching attempts to capture the role and mission the alliance is pursuing anew."--Shotaro Yachi, Former Vice-Minister at Japan's Ministry of Foreign Affairs
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Despite the Bush administration’s rhetorical emphasis on the U.S.-Japan alliance as the “cornerstone of U.S. security policy in Asia,” the alliance evolved into one cog of U.S. global security partnerships as Japan sent its troops to remote locations like the Indian Ocean and Iraq. In Asia, Japan’s desire to cement the U.S. commitment to its security has suffered from both perceived lack of American credibility and the United States’ lack of sensitivities to Japan’s relations with its regional neighbors. In this book, a team of American and Japanese experts examine to what extent diverging priorities in the U.S.-Japan alliance are real and whether they are not remedied with political and diplomatic leadership and other processes. American and Japanese authors are paired to analyze the same topic, where doing so is possible, for comparing their perspectives.
Description for Bookstore
In this book, a team of American and Japanese experts examine to what extent diverging priorities in the U.S.-Japan alliance are real
Main Description
Despite the Bush administration's rhetorical emphasis on the U.S.-Japan alliance as the "cornerstone of U.S. security policy in Asia," the alliance evolved into one cog of U.S. global security partnerships as Japan sent its troops to remote locations like the Indian Ocean and Iraq. In Asia, Japan's desire to cement the U.S. commitment to its security has suffered from both perceived lack of American credibility and the United States' lack of sensitivities to Japan's relations with its regional neighbors. In this book, a team of American and Japanese experts examine to what extent diverging priorities in the U.S.-Japan alliance are real and whether they are not remedied with political and diplomatic leadership and other processes. American and Japanese authors are paired to analyze the same topic, where doing so is possible, for comparing their perspectives.
Main Description
The U.S.-Japan security alliance, which initially focused on Japan's territorial defense and then started to merge with broader U.S. global strategy, now must deal with the rise of Japan's neighbors. This edited volume puts forth an empirically rigorous analysis of the ongoing transformation of the U.S.-Japan alliance. As the Obama administration shifts U.S. foreign policy into a multilateral mode, Japan's neighbors today are more likely to voice their issues concerning the U.S.-Japan alliance. Rigorous analysis of third-party perspectives of the U.S.-Japan alliance are key to helping us understand what external challenges lie ahead in terms of managing this crucial partnership.
Bowker Data Service Summary
American and Japanese experts examine to what extent diverging priorities in the U.S.-Japan alliance are real and whether they are not remedied with political and diplomatic leadership and other processes. American and Japanese authors are paired to analyze the same topic, where doing so is possible, for comparing their perspectives.
Table of Contents
"List of Figures and Tablesp. vii
Alliance Constrained: Japan, the United States, and Regional Securityp. 1
Costs and Benefits of the U.S.-Japan Alliance from the Japanese Perspectivep. 13
Refining the U.S. Japan Strategic Bargainp. 31
The Merits of Alliance Japanese Perspective - Logic Underpins Japan's Global a Regional_Security Rolep. 53
Global Costs and Benefits of the U. S. Japan Alliance: An American Viewp. 75
Korea and the Japan-U. S. Alliance: A Japanese Perspectivep. 91
Korea and the U.S.-Japan Alliance: An American Perspectivep. 119
Liberal Deterrence of China: Challenges in Achieving Japan's China Policyp. 137
The Security Dilemma in Asian Architecture: United States, Japan, and Chinap. 157
How Russia Matters in Japan-U.S. Alliancep. 177
The U.S.-Japan Alliance and Russiap. 195
Evolution of the Australia-Japan Security Partnership: Toward a Softer Triangle Alliance with the United States?p. 217
The United States, Japan, and Australia: Security Linkages to Southeast Asiap. 233
The North Atlantic Treaty Organization: New Chances for the Japan-U.S. Alliance?p. 253
Conclusion: Active SDF, Coming End of Regional Ambiguity, and Comprehensive Political Alliancep. 271
List of Contributorsp. 291
Bibliographyp. 293
Indexp. 311
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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