Catalogue


Unipolarity and the evolution of America's Cold War alliances [electronic resource] /
Nigel R. Thalakada.
imprint
Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire ; New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2012.
description
x, 198 p. ; 22 cm.
ISBN
9780230368132
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire ; New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2012.
isbn
9780230368132
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Introduction: the purpose of alliances; the end of the Cold War and the changing nature of alliances -- Management-of-power -- The North Atlantic Treaty Organization -- The United States-Japan alliance -- The United States-South Korea alliance -- The Australia-New Zealand-United States alliance.
catalogue key
8553333
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Nigel R. Thalakada is a former senior policy advisor with over ten years' experience in the Canadian Department of National Defense, including assignments at NATO headquarters and at the US Department of Defense. He holds a PhD in Political Science from Yale University, USA.
Summaries
Description for Bookstore
Describes the changing dynamics of US relations with its key allies since the end of the Cold War
Long Description
The end of the Cold War has had a profound effect on the operation of America's Cold War alliances. Created initially as 'balance-of-power' instruments that is, designed to check communist expansion by the Soviet Union and its Warsaw Pact allies alliances have since become 'management-of-power' instruments. Allies now seek to benefit from and seek to have influence over the exercise of American power and, on the other, the United States tries to distribute the burden of maintaining international order and stifling any attempt to balance against it. Using this novel framework, the author demonstrates how management-of-power dynamics are evident in the operations, capabilities, policies and force structures of America's principal alliances namely, NATO and those with Japan, South Korea and Australia.
Main Description
Thalakada argues that the principal purpose of US alliances have shifted since the end of the Cold War from containing communist expansionism (balance of power) to preserving and exercising US power (management of power).He also looks across all US alliances highlighting the trend from regionally-based to more globally-active alliances.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Thalakada argues that the principal purpose of US alliances have shifted since the end of the Cold War from containing communist expansionism (balance of power) to preserving and exercising US power (management of power).
Long Description
The end of the Cold War has had a profound effect on the operation of America's Cold War alliances. Created initially as 'balance-of-power' instruments that is, designed to check communist expansion by the Soviet Union and its Warsaw Pact allies alliances have since become 'management-of-power' instruments. On one hand, allies now seek to benefit from and have influence over the exercise of American power and, on the other, the United States tries to distribute the burden of maintaining international order and stifle any attempt to balance against it. Using this novel framework, the author demonstrates how management-of-power dynamics are evident in the operations, capabilities, policies and force structures of America's principal alliances namely, NATO and those with Japan, South Korea and Australia.
Table of Contents
List of Tablesp. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. x
Introductionp. 1
The purpose of alliancesp. 3
The end of the Cold War and the changing nature of alliancesp. 5
Management of Powerp. 9
Alliances in unipolarityp. 9
Management of power: key characteristicsp. 13
Security guaranteep. 14
Leveraging the superpower's superior capabilitiesp. 15
Influencing the superpower's exercise of powerp. 16
Distributing the burden of maintaining international securityp. 17
Stifling the tendency to balance and maintaining international leadershipp. 18
Conclusionp. 19
The North Atlantic Treaty Organizationp. 21
Cold War focus on balance of powerp. 21
Post-Cold War focus on management of powerp. 25
Operationsp. 26
Capabilities and membershipp. 28
Post-9/11 operationsp. 30
Post-9/11 capabilities and membershipp. 37
US posturep. 41
The 2003 Iraq Warp. 42
Conclusionp. 54
European security and defense policyp. 55
The US-Japan Alliancep. 63
Gold War focus on balance of powerp. 63
Post-Cold War focus on management of powerp. 68
Operationsp. 69
Policy and capabilities: the 'normalization' of Japanese defense posturep. 7
US posturep. 84
Conclusionp. 84
The US-South Korea Alliancep. 91
Cold War focus on balance of powerp. 91
Post-Cold War focus on management of powerp. 93
Operationsp. 96
Capabilitiesp. 98
US posturep. 100
Conclusionp. 101
The Australia-New Zealand-US Alliancep. 104
Cold War focus on balance of powerp. 104
Post-Cold War focus on management of powerp. 108
Operationsp. 111
Capabilitiesp. 114
US posturep. 117
Growing US rapprochement with New Zealandp. 117
Conclusionp. 123
Conclusionp. 128
Other US alliancesp. 131
Thailandp. 132
Philippinesp. 133
Singaporep. 136
The transition from George W. Bush to Barack Obamap. 137
The impact of the worldwide economic crisisp. 139
Notesp. 143
Bibliographyp. 172
Indexp. 193
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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