Catalogue


Sex power and the Games [electronic resource] /
Kath Woodward, Open University, UK.
imprint
Houndsmills, Bassingstoke, Hampshire ; New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2012.
description
ix, 205 pages ; 23 cm.
ISBN
9780230283190 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Houndsmills, Bassingstoke, Hampshire ; New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2012.
isbn
9780230283190 (hardback)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8551829
 
Including bibliographical references (pages 191-200) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Kath Woodward is Professor of Sociology at the Open University, UK, working on feminist theoretical perspectives on sex and race equality and a member of CRESC Recent publications include Embodied Sporting Practices; Social Sciences: The Big Issues; Boxing, Masculinity and Identity; and, with Sophie Woodward, Why Feminism Matters.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2013-02-01:
Sociology and women's studies scholar Woodward (Open Univ, UK) examines the sex/gender dimension of social inequality challenged by and generated from the Olympic Games. Using the concept of sex/gender, the author highlights the importance of going beyond discursive analysis to look at the materiality and phenomenological experiences of inequality. What is impressive about her book is that it examines sex/gender inequality in relation to a wide range of issues surrounding the Games, such as the changes in governance of sports, the use of gender verification testing, media representation, and political activism, as well as spatial and national identification generated by the Games. In addition, the author also explores the possibilities and challenges in promoting diversity in both arts and sports. Analyzing materials ranging from official documents to fieldwork data, Woodward comprehensively illustrates how the Games as well as their connection with various social, economic, and cultural apparatuses both challenge and generate sex/gender inequality. Overall, this is an important, invaluable resource for those interested in the gender dimension of sports. Summing Up: Essential. Graduate students/faculty. M. C. Cheng University of Toronto
Reviews
Review Quotes
'...Woodward comprehensively illustrates how the Games as well as their connection with various social, economic and cultural apparatuses both challenge and generate sex/gender inequality. Overall, this is an important, invaluable resource for those interested in the gender dimension of sports.' - Essential, by Choice
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, February 2013
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Summaries
Main Description
This book explores the social and cultural impact of the Olympic Games, examining gender and sport, the inequalities between nations and people and what the Games offer and how they are changing, in relation to spectacles, spectatorship and culture, including the links between art and sport.
Long Description
The Olympics promise democratic participation in a massive spectacle of competitive sport, but there remain inequalities, between nations and between people as well as the chance to widen opportunities, not least in the areas of sex gender. The enfleshed bodies of those who take part and the bodies that regulate sport are central to the debate. The two are linked, especially in a climate of change and the need to provide complex classifications, including gender verification and what constitutes. This book examines the social and cultural impact of the games, at what they offer and how they are changing, for example in relation to spectacles, spectatorship and culture, including the links between art and sport. The rules and practices of the games have changed but how and who has the power to change them? This book explores what forces are in play and where power lies.
Description for Bookstore
This book examines gender and sport in relation to the Olympic Games, showing how gender and the Olympics are linked, and how sport constructs particular discourses relating to gender and sexuality
Long Description
The Olympics promise democratic participation in a massive spectacle of competitive sport, but there remain inequalities, between nations and between people as well as the chance to widen opportunities, not least in the areas of sex gender. The enfleshed bodies of those who take part and the bodies that regulate sport are central to the debate. The two are linked, especially in a climate of change and the need to provide complex classifications, including gender verification and what constitutes. This book examines the social and cultural impact of the games, at what they offer and how they are changing, for example in relation to spectacles, spectatorship and culture, including the links between art and sport and how art can promote social inclusion. The rules and practices of the games have changed but how and who has the power to change them? This book explores what forces are in play and where power lies.
Bowker Data Service Summary
This text explores the social and cultural impact of the Olympic Games, examining gender and sport, the inequalities between nations and people and at what the Games offer and how they are changing, in relation to spectacles, spectatorship and culture, including the links between art and sport.
Table of Contents
List of Figuresp. viii
Acknowledgementsp. ix
Introduction: Putting Sex Gender on the Agendap. 1
Regulatory Frameworks: Playing by the Rulesp. 17
Finding the Truth: Hoping for Certaintyp. 44
Nations, Host Cities and Opportunitiesp. 71
Spectacles and Spectatorsp. 100
The Art of Sportp. 122
Contradictions, Controversies and Disruptionsp. 153
Conclusion: Sex Power and the Games Conclusionp. 178
Referencesp. 191
Indexp. 201
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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