Catalogue


Peasants, political police, and the early Soviet State [electronic resource] : surveillance and accommodation under the new economic policy /
Hugh D. Hudson, Jr.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2012.
description
xiii, 177 p. : ill., map ; 22 cm.
ISBN
0230338860, 9780230338869
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2012.
isbn
0230338860
9780230338869
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
State, peasants, and police to 1921 -- Famine, market forces, and ameliorative actions, 1921-1923 -- Lenin's death, "face to the countryside," and growing police fears, 1924 -- Soviet elections, grain crises, and kulaks, 1925-1926 -- Liquidation of kulak influence, war panic, and the elimination of the kulaks as a class, 1927-1929.
catalogue key
8549148
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [165]-173) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Hugh D. Hudson JR. is a professor of History at Georgia State University. His publications include Modernization Through Resistance: War, Mir, Tsar, and Law in the World of the Pre-reform Russian Peasantry; Blueprints and Blood: The Stalinization of Soviet Architecture, 1917-1937; and The Rise of the Demidov Family and the Russian Iron Industry in the Eighteenth Century.
Reviews
Review Quotes
'In a valuable, fresh study of the Soviet countryside and state policy, Hugh Hudson draws deeply on police reports from the 1920s. Along the way, he provides important new insight into peasant concepts of justice and legitimate government. The story of how the police and the leadership shifted after Lenin's death from realistic appraisals of rural problems to a view that 'enemies' were leading the peasantry is complex; Peasants, Political Police, and the Early Soviet State yields much new information about the development of Soviet policy in a crucial area.'Robert W. Thurston, Phillip R. Shriver Professor of History, Miami University of Ohio 'Peasants, Political Police, and the Early Soviet State focuses on Cheka/OGPU reports from the countryside, specifically how agents assessed the peasants' mood, and the sources of peasants' discontent and satisfaction. It is a tightly focused book that stays within the bounds of reports (archival materials), and it is very balanced in its treatment of Cheka/OGPU reports. It offers an original view of the Cheka/OGPU's agents' pragmatic, often empathetic analysis of the economic, agricultural, and political situation in the countryside, how and why those reports changed over time, and how the once independent analyses came to influence and then legitimize the sharp policy shifts enacted by the Stalin group. Insightful and valuable.'William J. Chase, professor, Department of History, University of Pittsburgh
"This important volume illuminates how the political police described peasant grievances in the 1920s and how a change in central political attitudes shaped these descriptions. Hudson's close reading of reports shows that the Soviet state relied on mass surveillance of its population to better understand and control them." - The American Historical Review '...the greatest contributions of Hudson's study are that it introduces a third actor into the story of peasant-state relations in the early Soviet period - the secret police - and that it suggests that, if the regime failed to reach an accommodation with the peasantry during NEP, it was not for a lack of trying.' - Colleen M. Moore, Indiana University, The NEP Era: Soviet Russia 1921-1928
'...the greatest contributions of Hudson's study are that it introduces a third actor into the story of peasant-state relations in the early Soviet period - the secret police - and that it suggests that, if the regime failed to reach an accommodation with the peasantry during NEP, it was not for a lack of trying.' - Colleen M. Moore, Indiana University, The NEP Era: Soviet Russia 1921-1928
"This important volume illuminates how the political police described peasant grievances in the 1920s and how a change in central political attitudes shaped these descriptions. Hudson's close reading of reports shows that the Soviet state relied on mass surveillance of its population to better understand and control them." - The American Historical Review "In a valuable, fresh study of the Soviet countryside and state policy, Hugh Hudson draws deeply on police reports from the 1920s. Along the way, he provides important new insight into peasant concepts of justice and legitimate government. The story of how the police and the leadership shifted after Lenin's death from realistic appraisals of rural problems to a view that 'enemies' were leading the peasantry is complex; Peasants, Political Police, and the Early Soviet State yields much new information about the development of Soviet policy in a crucial area." - Robert W. Thurston, Phillip R. Shriver Professor of History, Miami University of Ohio "Peasants, Political Police, and the Early Soviet State focuses on Cheka/OGPU reports from the countryside, specifically how agents assessed the peasants' mood, and the sources of peasants' discontent and satisfaction. It is a tightly focused book that stays within the bounds of reports (archival materials), and it is very balanced in its treatment of Cheka/OGPU reports. It offers an original view of the Cheka/OGPU's agents' pragmatic, often empathetic analysis of the economic, agricultural, and political situation in the countryside, how and why those reports changed over time, and how the once independent analyses came to influence and then legitimize the sharp policy shifts enacted by the Stalin group. Insightful and valuable." - William J. Chase, professor, Department of History, University of Pittsburgh
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Summaries
Main Description
This book combines social and institutional histories of Russia, focusing on the secret police and their evolving relationship with the peasantry in the period leading up to collectivization. Based on an analysis of Cheka/OGPU reports, the book argues that the police did not initially respond to peasant resistance to Bolshevik demands simply with the gunrather, they listened to peasant voices. The police argued that compromise was possible, and that the peasants could be convinced towork within the Bolshevik construct of state and society. As time went on, however, local police agents increasingly saw themselves engaged in a war with the peasantry over control of grain and domination of local organs of power. As the focus shifted from objective economic factors to the putative influence of the kulaks, the only solution became to break the peasantry.
Description for Bookstore
This book combines social and institutional histories of Russia, focusing on the secret police and their evolving relationship with the peasantry
Long Description
This book combines social and institutional histories of Russia, focusing on the secret police and their evolving relationship with the peasantry in the period leading up to collectivization. Based on an analysis of Cheka/OGPU reports, the book argues that the police did not initially respond to peasant resistance to Bolshevik demands simply with the gun - rather, they listened to peasant voices. The police argued that compromise was possible, and that the peasants could be convinced to work within the Bolshevik construct of state and society. As time went on, however, local police agents increasingly saw themselves engaged in a war with the peasantry over control of grain and domination of local organs of power. As the focus shifted from objective economic factors to the putative influence of the kulaks, the only solution became to break the peasantry.
Main Description
This book combines social and institutional histories of post-revolutionary Russia, focusing on the secret police and their evolving relationship with the peasantry in the period leading up to collectivization. Based on an analysis of Cheka/OGPU reports, the book argues that at first the police did not only respond to peasant resistance with force; rather, they also listened to peasant voices. The police believed that compromise was possible, and that the peasants could be convinced to work within the Bolshevik construct of state and society. As time went on, however, local police agents increasingly saw themselves engaged in a war with the peasantry over control of grain and domination of local organs of power. As the focus shifted from objective economic factors to the putative influence of the kulaks, the only solution became to break the peasantry.
Main Description
This book combines social and institutional histories of Russia, focusing on the secret police and their evolving relationship with the peasantry in the period leading up to collectivization. Based on an analysis of Cheka/OGPU reports, the book argues that the police did not initially respond to peasant resistance to Bolshevik demands simply with the gunrather, they listened to peasant voices. The police argued that compromise was possible, and that the peasants could be convinced to work within the Bolshevik construct of state and society. As time went on, however, local police agents increasingly saw themselves engaged in a war with the peasantry over control of grain and domination of local organs of power. As the focus shifted from objective economic factors to the putative influence of the kulaks, the only solution became to break the peasantry.
Bowker Data Service Summary
This text combines social and institutional histories of Russia, focusing on the secret police and their evolving relationship with the peasantry in the period leading up to collectivization.
Table of Contents
List of Figuresp. viii
Mapp. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. x
List of Terms and Abbreviationsp. xii
Introductionp. 1
State, Peasants, and Police to 1921p. 7
Famine, Market Forces, and Ameliorative Actions, 1921-1923p. 25
Lenin's Death, "Face to the Countryside," and Growing Police Fears, 1924p. 47
Soviet Elections, Grain Crises, and Kulaks, 1925-1926p. 71
Liquidation of Kulak Influence, War Panic, and the Elimination of the Kulaks as a Class, 1927-1929p. 89
Conclusionp. 113
Notesp. 127
Bibliographyp. 165
Indexp. 175
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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