Catalogue


Migration, mining, and the African diaspora [electronic resource] : Guyana in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries /
Barbara P. Josiah.
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2011.
description
xix, 274 p. : ill., map ; 25 cm.
ISBN
9780230115897 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2011.
isbn
9780230115897 (hardback)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
abstract
"From the late 1800s, African workers migrated to the mineral-rich hinterland areas of Guyana, mined gold, diamonds, and bauxite; diversified the country's economy; and contributed to national development. Utilizing real estate, financial, and death records, as well as oral accounts of the labor migrants along with colonial officials and mining companies' information stored in National Archives in Guyana, Great Britain, and the U.S and the Library of Congress, the study situates miners into the historical structure of the country's economic development. It analyzes the workers attraction to mining from agriculture, their concepts of "order and progress", and how they shaped their lives in positive ways rather than becoming mere victims of colonialism. In this contentious plantation society plagued by adversarial relations between the economic elites and the laboring class, in addition to producing the strategically important bauxite for the aviation era of World Wars I&II, for almost a century the workers braved the ecologically hostile and sometimes deadly environments of the gold and diamond fields in the quest for El Dorado in Guyana"--
catalogue key
8547827
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [249]-263) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Barbara P. Josiah is an assistant professor of History at The City University of New York, John Jay College of Criminal Justice. She has published articles in The Journal of African American History and The Journal of Caribbean History, among others.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2012-06-01:
The history of the African diaspora has become an important topic for scholars of the Caribbean, suggesting the complex dynamic in the circulation of people and commodities in this part of the world. Josiah (John Jay College of Criminal Justice, CUNY) examines this topic from the perspective of Guyana, looking at the ways in which African communities struggled to survive, gain freedom, and adapt to changing economic conditions in the last two centuries. She specifically looks at the case of mining and how African Guyanese men and women preferred working in gold and diamond mining rather than in traditional sugar plantations. Employers' abuses and complete disregard for the well-being of their workers, the author points out, made mine work dangerous, unpleasant, and extremely hard. Although conditions slightly changed with the advent of bauxite production and employers' efforts to improve living and working conditions, mining continued to rely on workers' sacrifices. The book contributes to understanding the development of mining in the Caribbean and the role played by African Guyanese communities. While it provides a good but condensed overview on the topic, readers are left wanting more details of the story. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate students, faculty. A. Vergara California State University, Los Angeles
Reviews
Review Quotes
'Barbara Josiah, a US-based academic, has written a loving and detailed account of mining in Guyana in the 19th century and first half of the 20th century...a thorough piece of historical sociology...' -Richard Bourne, Institute of Commonwealth Studies, The Round Table
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, June 2012
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Library of Congress Summary
"From the late 1800s, African workers migrated to the mineral-rich hinterland areas of Guyana, mined gold, diamonds, and bauxite; diversified the country's economy; and contributed to national development. Utilizing real estate, financial, and death records, as well as oral accounts of the labor migrants along with colonial officials and mining companies' information stored in National Archives in Guyana, Great Britain, and the U.S and the Library of Congress, the study situates miners into the historical structure of the country's economic development. It analyzes the workers attraction to mining from agriculture, their concepts of "order and progress", and how they shaped their lives in positive ways rather than becoming mere victims of colonialism. In this contentious plantation society plagued by adversarial relations between the economic elites and the laboring class, in addition to producing the strategically important bauxite for the aviation era of World Wars I&II, for almost a century the workers braved the ecologically hostile and sometimes deadly environments of the gold and diamond fields in the quest for El Dorado in Guyana"--
Long Description
From the late 1800s, African workers migrated to the mineral-rich hinterland areas of Guyana, mined gold, diamonds, and bauxite; diversified the country's economy; and contributed to national development. Utilizing real estate, financial, and death records, as well as oral accounts of the labor migrants along with colonial officials and mining companies' information stored in National Archives in Guyana, Great Britain, and the U.S. Library of Congress, the study situates miners into the historical structure of the country's economic development. It analyzes the workers attraction to mining from agriculture, their concepts of "order and progress," and how they shaped their lives in positive ways rather than becoming mere victims of colonialism. In this contentious plantation society plagued by adversarial relations between the economic elites and the laboring class, in addition to producing the strategically important bauxite for the aviation era of World Wars I & II, for almost a century the workers braved the ecologically hostile and sometimes deadly environments of the gold and diamond fields in the quest for El Dorado in Guyana.
Bowker Data Service Summary
This title analyses the workers attraction to mining from agriculture, their concepts of 'order and progress', and how they shaped their lives rather than becoming mere victims of colonialism. The study is intended for scholars, students, and general audiences.
Table of Contents
List of Tables and Figuresp. ix
Prefacep. xi
Acknowledgmentsp. xvii
List of Abbreviationsp. xix
Introductionp. 1
African Diaspora Migrant Miners and Guyana's El Doradop. 9
Migration and Mining Strategies in a Colonial Societyp. 23
Mining Factors in a Diversified Economyp. 39
The Perils of Labor in Mining: Migration and Mortalityp. 57
Aspects of Infrastructure Development: Gold and Diamondsp. 71
Another Approach: Organizing Bauxite Productionp. 93
Evolving Relations: Mining and Trade Unionismp. 109
Internal Migration and Village Dynamics: Families and Communities Copingp. 129
Knowledge Transfer and Cooperativism: Agriculture and Mining Erasp. 145
African Continuities, Jewels, and Economic Linkages to Miningp. 157
Conclusionp. 175
p. 179
p. 183
p. 185
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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