Catalogue

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Losing an empire and finding a role [electronic resource] : Britain, the USA, NATO and nuclear weapons, 1964-70 /
Kristan Stoddart.
imprint
Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire ; New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2012.
description
xv, 327 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
023030088X (hardback), 9780230300880 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire ; New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2012.
isbn
023030088X (hardback)
9780230300880 (hardback)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8547136
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Kristan Stoddart is a research assistant at the Department of International Politics at Aberystwyth University, UK, and a member of the Centre for Intelligence and International Security. Previously he was a research fellow at the Mountbatten Centre for International Studies, University of Southampton.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2013-02-01:
Making sense of the interwoven strategic, political, diplomatic, and technical strands of Britain's nuclear policy in the late 1960s is a daunting task, but Stoddart (Aberystwyth Univ., UK) has done it. This heavily documented volume relies on recently declassified records and relevant secondary sources to elucidate its historical complexity. While Britain "lost" its empire by withdrawing military forces east of Suez, the Labour government's decision to retain the US submarine-based Polaris ballistic missile system, and Britain's important roles as a US strategic partner and NATO ally, ensured that the UK would continue to be a major power. Stoddart also shows that Britain's strategic culture and policy held firmly to the belief that the purpose of nuclear weapons was (and remains) credible deterrence, not war-fighting, and that nuclear war was considered unwinnable. Having said that, this book is not for the casual reader. Although well written and interesting, it is dense and will appeal to a limited audience. Recommended for university and large public libraries, and those specializing in strategic studies and international security issues. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduate, graduate, research, and professional collections. J. P. Smaldone Georgetown University
Reviews
Review Quotes
'Making sense of the interwoven strategic, poltical, diplomatic, and technical strands of Britain's nuclear policy in the late 1960s is a daunting task, but Stoddart has done it.' - Recommended by Choice
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, February 2013
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This text sheds fresh light on developments in British nuclear weapons policy between October 1964, when the Labour Party came back into power under Harold Wilson following a 13 year absence, and June 1970 when the Conservative government of Edward Heath was elected.
Description for Bookstore
Using freshly declassified material, Stoddart generates new insights into a vast array of previously classified areas of nuclear weapons policy in the UK, America and NATO
Long Description
In this book, Kristan Stoddart revises several public misconceptions regarding Britain, the United States and NATO in the nuclear weapons field. Based on the latest declassified evidence collected both in the UK and the USA, Stoddart shows that despite losing its empire Britain was finding a role a role based on the defence of the NATO area at the expense of large scale extra-European commitments. Its primary method of achieving this was through nuclear weapons with an upgraded capability in Polaris. This story takes in a vast geographical scope involving some of the key actors in world politics at the time including Prime Minister Harold Wilson, US President Lyndon Johnson and French President Charles de Gaulle, with the tensions of that triangular relationship at the heart of Britain's renewed and refocused nuclear empire.
Main Description
This book sheds fresh light on developments in British nuclear weapons policy between October 1964, when the Labour Party came back into power under Harold Wilson following a thirteen year absence, and June 1970 when the Conservative government of Edward Heath was elected.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. vi
Series Editor's Introductionp. vii
Acknowledgementsp. ix
List of Abbreviationsp. xii
Introductionp. 3
The Labour Government: The Inheritance of Polaris and Anglo-US Nuclear Relations, 1964-1966p. 18
The Labour Government and UK/US Responses to Soviet Anti-Ballistic Missiles, 1964-1966p. 37
Britain, the United States and the Reform of NATO Strategy, 1964-1966p. 55
Britain, America and Allied Tactical Nuclear Weapons Planning, 1964-1966p. 79
The Second Wilson Government and the Maintenance of Polaris, 1966-1970p. 118
ABM Systems and Arms Control, 1966-1970p. 153
NATO and Flexible Response, 1966-1970p. 166
Britain, America and Allied Tactical Nuclear Operations, 1966-1970p. 199
Conclusionp. 227
Notesp. 243
Bibliographyp. 299
Appendixp. 313
Indexp. 315
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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