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Governing post-war Britain [electronic resource] : the paradoxes of progress, 1951-1973 /
Glen O'Hara.
imprint
Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire ; New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2012.
description
xi, 309 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0230230563 (hardback), 9780230230569 (hardback)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire ; New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2012.
isbn
0230230563 (hardback)
9780230230569 (hardback)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
catalogue key
8544433
 
Includes bibliography (p. 261-299) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Glen O'Hara is Reader in the History of Public Policy at Oxford Brookes University, UK. He is the author or editor of several boks about modern British history, including From Dreams to Disillusionment: Economic and Social Planning in 1960s Britain and Britain and the Sea since 1600.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2013-01-01:
O'Hara (public policy, Oxford Brookes Univ., UK) addresses a paradox: Britons enjoyed an unprecedented rise in their standard of living between 1951 and 1973, but grew increasingly skeptical about the government's ability to govern wisely. In resolving this paradox, the author examines the government's efforts at modernization in three key areas: international, the managed economy, and national education. O'Hara suggests that the influence of foreign archetypes, particularly the French system of economic planning, hampered rather than helped efforts to accelerate Britain's economic growth rate. The author uses the diaries of Alex Cairncross, the government's chief economic adviser during most of this period, as well as records from The National Archives, to demonstrate that the government's economists often made educated guesses in recommending policies, and that this contributed significantly to its inability to effectively manage the economy. The final section draws attention to the government's unsuccessful efforts to reform education. O'Hara's central theme throughout is that policies frequently had unintended consequences that often created a new set of problems, and that this contributed to the public's disillusionment with government. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. H. L. Smith University of Houston--Victoria
Reviews
Review Quotes
'Governing Post-War Britain is a good contribution to scholarship about post-war Britain, exploring the shifting policy debates about international influence, the Anglo-American relationship and social reforms.' - European Review of History
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, January 2013
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Glen O'Hara draws a compelling picture of Second World War Britain by investigating relations between people and government - demands for universally-available social services, the increasing complexity of the new solutions to these needs, and mounting frustration with both among both governors and governed.
Description for Bookstore
A look at modern Britain from 'top' to 'bottom' of its politics “ drawing a compelling picture of a country that experienced increasingly tense relations between governors and governed
Description for Bookstore
A look at modern Britain from 'top' to 'bottom' of its politics drawing a compelling picture of a country that experienced increasingly tense relations between governors and governed
Long Description
Glen O'Hara looks at modern British politics from 'top' to 'bottom' “ from Prime Ministers' relationship with US Presidents and the Cabinet room, to individual neighbourhoods and schools. In doing so, he fuses the new political history of the everyday and the humdrum with high political accounts involving economic and social advisers, top politicians and senior civil servants. Post-war Britain emerges as a country that experienced increasingly tense relations between governors and the governed. The electorate demanded ever wider access to fairly-provided and universally-available social services; elites looked to other European and American countries for how this search for quality might be mounted. However, new solutions became ever more complex, and increasingly likely to conflict with one another or involve unintended additional effects. Drawing on new archival findings from across the United Kingdom, among personal and political papers as much as the files of national and international governance, O'Hara uses the new economics of organization, management and complexity to draw a compelling picture of the post-war settlement as it came under strain during the 1950s and 1960s.
Long Description
Glen O'Hara looks at modern British politics from 'top' to 'bottom' from Prime Ministers' relationship with US Presidents and the Cabinet room, to individual neighbourhoods and schools. In doing so, he fuses the new political history of the everyday and the humdrum with high political accounts involving economic and social advisers, top politicians and senior civil servants. Post-war Britain emerges as a country that experienced increasingly tense relations between governors and the governed. The electorate demanded ever wider access to fairly-provided and universally-available social services; elites looked to other European and American countries for how this search for quality might be mounted. However, new solutions became ever more complex, and increasingly likely to conflict with one another or involve unintended additional effects. Drawing on new archival findings from across the United Kingdom, among personal and political papers as much as the files of national and international governance, O'Hara uses the new economics of organization, management and complexity to draw a compelling picture of the post-war settlement as it came under strain during the 1950s and 1960s.
Main Description
Glen OHara draws a compelling picture of Second World War Britain by investigating relations between people and government: the electorates rising expectations and demands for universally-available social services, the increasing complexity of the new so
Main Description
Glen O'Hara draws a compelling picture of Second World War Britain by investigating relations between people and government: the electorate's rising expectations and demands for universally-available social services, the increasing complexity of the new solutions to these needs, and mounting frustration with both among both governors and governed.
Table of Contents
List of Figuresp. viii
List of Tablesp. ix
Acknowledgementsp. x
Introduction: Progress and its Paradoxesp. 1
Ideas from 'the Outside'
The Use and Abuse of Foreign Archetypes in British Economic Policyp. 11
Archetype, Example or Warning? British Views of Scandinaviap. 28
Sliding Away from Stability
President Kennedy, Prime Minister Macmillan and the Gold Market, 1960-63p. 53
President Johnson, Prime Minister Wilson and the Slow Collapse of Equilibrium, 1964-68p. 73
Governing Britain
The Creation and Early Work of the Parliamentary 'Ombudsman'p. 93
Sir Alec Cairncross and the Art and Craft of Economic Advice, 1961-69p. 112
'An All Over Expansion': The Politics of the Land in 'Golden Age' Britainp. 131
Educating the Nation
Planning the Education System in the Post-War Erap. 153
Slum Schools, Civil Servants and Sociology: Educational Priority Areas, 1967-72p. 176
Conclusion: Strange Triumphs?p. 195
Notesp. 201
Bibliographyp. 261
Indexp. 300
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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