Catalogue


The [European] other in medieval Arabic literature and culture [electronic resource] : Ninth-Twelfth Century AD /
Nizar F. Hermes.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, c2012.
description
xiv, 241 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0230109403 (hbk.), 9780230109407 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
More Details
series title
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, c2012.
isbn
0230109403 (hbk.)
9780230109407 (hbk.)
restrictions
Licensed for access by U. of T. users.
contents note
Translation, Travel, and the Other : the Fascination with Greek and Oriental Cultures -- European Barbarity and Civilization in some Medieval Arabic Geographical Sources : Al-Masudi and al-Bakri as Two Case Studies -- Writing the North : Europe and Europeans in Medieval Arabic Travel Literature -- Poetry, Frontiers, and Alterity : Views and Perceptions of al-Rum (Byzantines) and al-Ifranja (Crusaders) -- Appendix of Translated Poetry.
catalogue key
8543584
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Nizar F. Hermes received his PhD in Comparative Literature from the University of Toronto. He has been a lecturer of Arabic Studies at the University of Toronto and published book chapters, journal articles, and creative pieces in English and Arabic.
Summaries
Main Description
Contrary to the monolithic impression left by postcolonial theories of Orientalism, the book makes the case that Orientals did not exist solely to be gazed at. Exploring a cross-section of 9th through 12th centuries, non-religious Arabic prose and poetic texts such as the geo-cosmographical literature, recits de voyages, diplomatic memoirs, captivity narratives, pre-Crusade and Crusade poetry, Nizar F. Hermes shows that there was no shortage of medieval Muslims who cast curious eyes and minds towards the " European Other" and that more than a handful of them were textually and physically interested in Europe.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Contrary to the monolithic impression left by postcolonial theories of Orientalism, this book makes the case that Orientals did not exist solely to be gazed at. Hermes shows that there was no shortage of medieval Muslims who cast curious eyes towards the European Other and that more than a handful of them were interested in Europe.
Description for Bookstore
.
Description for Bookstore
Study of the postcolonial theories of Orientalism, looks at medieval Muslims interested in Europe.
Main Description
Contrary to the monolithic impression left by postcolonial theories of Orientalism, the book makes the case that Orientals did not exist solely to be gazed at. Exploring a cross-section of 9th through 12th centuries, non-religious Arabic prose and poetic texts such as the geo-cosmographical literature, r├ęcits de voyages, diplomatic memoirs, captivity narratives, pre-Crusade and Crusade poetry, Nizar F. Hermes shows that there was no shortage of medieval Muslims who cast curious eyes and minds towards the "European Other" and that more than a handful of them were textually and physically interested in Europe.
Table of Contents
Preface and Acknowledgmentsp. xiii
Note on Transliterationp. xv
Note on the Translation of Arabic Poetryp. xvii
Introduction: Be(yond)fore Orientalism; Medieval Muslims and the Otherp. 1
Translation, Travel, and the Other: The Fascination with Greek and Oriental Culturesp. 11
European Barbarity and Civilization in Some Medieval Arabic Geographical Sources: Al-Mas'udi and al-Bakri as Two Case Studiesp. 39
Writing the North: Europe and Europeans in Medieval Arabic Travel Literaturep. 71
Poetry Frontiers, and Alterity: Views and Perceptions of al-Rum (Byzantines) and al-Ifranja (Franks)p. 135
Conclusionp. 171
Appendix of Translated Poetryp. 177
Notesp. 183
Bibliographyp. 211
Indexp. 227
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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